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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 01, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

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FRzWIDAYJULY 1. I1949'

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1THUMAS SYSTEM:
Answer Discovered for
Fast-Talking Professors

By HERB KRAVITZ
If you happen to be suffering
from a "loquacious professor"-
that is, can't seem to write as fast
as he can talk-this may be a so-
lution to your problem.
'U Students
In Program
Fifteen University of Michigan
men are among the first contin-
gent of collegiate medical stu-
dents who will attend one of four
six-week ROTC summer encamp-
ments at Brooke Army Medical
Center, Ft. Houston, Tex.
Michigan students attending are
Edward J. Anderson, Daniel J.
Boucher, Judson D. Cates, Warren
D. Cowan, Ralph O. Dunn, Jr.,
Robert J. Fisher, William C. God-
win, Hiram P. Manning.
Others are Palmer Packwood,
Charles W. Reiley, George F.
Saghy, Wesley G. Slack, James
M. Winkler, Philip J. Youngblood
and Richard W. Prior.
AYH Throwing
Barn Dance Party
The University Hostel Club will
throw an old-time square dancing
shindig from 8 to 11 p.m. Satur-
day in the Woman's Athletic
Building.
The Club will also hold a meet-
ing at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday in Lane
Elall. After the meeting, a square
dance will follow.
Square dancing will be held each
Saturday night, the Club plans.

A new experimental class in the
Thomas System of shorthand has

recently been organized for
dents in business education.

stu-I

THE COURSE carries no Uni-
versity credit but its instructor,
Elsie Freitag, expects that by the
end of the summer session, her
students will be taking words at
the rate of 60 to 80 per minute.
Miss Freitag said that the av-
erage rate in longhand is about
37 words a minute.
The Thomas System is compar-
atively new and according to Miss
Freitag, it is much simpler and
requires only about half as long
to learn as other shorthand sys-
tems in use today.
* * *
THOMAS, because he felt that
the shorthand systems being
taught at the time took too long
to teach, published a system of
his own in 1935.
In this system, he combined
some of the principles of other
methods in devising a shorthand
that is claimed to be just as fast,
but muchesimpler than other
current methods.
Miss Freitag said that she has
trained people in the course who
have never had any shorthand ex-
perience in twenty hours and those
with a knowledge of another sys-
tem, in about half that time.
* * *
THE THOMAS system is a con-
sonal system. As Miss Freitag ex-
plained, the first vowel of the
word is left alone and the remain-
ing vowels are dropped.
The class meets at 4 p.m., Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday in Rm.
268 Bus.Ad. Building.

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THREE OF A KIND TWICE-St. Peter's Hospital in Brunswick, N. J., hit the jackpot with two
sets of triplets among the four deliveries performed during the day. Odds against the two sets were
figured as about 47,000,000 to one. Above, Mrs. Robert Brill (left), of Milltown, N.J., and Mrs. George
Madak of Manville, N.J., display their six girls while their respective husbands look on.
STRUGGLE THROUGH HISTORY:
Religions Batle for Lives of Unborn.

4..

i

I mommummow

S6.PICT:0-Ri .
IPenny Singleton . Arthur Lake

Doors Open 1:15 P.M.
TODAY and SAT.!

Matinee 25c

Nights 35c

PLUS! 2ND HIT!

NOW ON THE SCREEN!P
Added "Ghost of Zorro"

By The Associated Press
Religions over a vast area of this
planet are engaged today in a cli-
mactic struggle for the minds and
souls of generations yet unborn.
The major battle has been join-
ed in Eastern Europe between the
forces of religion and the ruling
Communists. Behind the Iron
.Curtain organized religion fights
for its life.
* * *
IN THE SOVIET tJNION, the
official line, as pronounced by
Prime Minister Stalin himself, is
Slovak Reds
Fight Catholics
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia-(A)-
Roman Catholic and diplomatic
sources reported today loyal Cath-
olics are rioting against Commu-
nist groups in Slovakia in the
spreading church-state conflict.
In some areas of intensely Cath-
olic Slovakia it was necessary for
Communist authorities to impose
martial law for a period of about
60 hours, a diplomatic source here
said.
* * *
-"PERSISTENT reports about
troubles keep coming in," said a
reliable source in Bratislava, the
capital of Slovakia.
The Communist government's
ministry of interior in Prague
did not deny the reports.
The Information Ministry said
"the ministry of interior says it
has no official report on these
matters. It gives no confirmation,
nor is there any official denial."
* * *
POLICE IN ONE of the areas
reported , affected, Turciansky
Svaty Martin, last night denied
the reports and said they were ex-
periencing "exemplary quiet."
The Catholic and diplomatic in-
formants here said that in the
town of Nitra in southwest Slo-
vakia, 20 persons were injured in
clashes and one policeman was=
severely beaten.

LAST COMPLETE SHOW 8:20 P.M.

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

that there shall be no interfer-
ence whatever with the campaign
of. anti-religious propaganda.
This dramatic struggle occu-
pies a great share of the world's
attention today. Elsewhere in
the world there are conflicts
and frictions involving great re-
ligions. In the past few years,
Moslem fought Jew in the Mid-
dle East in what the Arabs pro-
claimed a "Holy War;" Hindus
and Moslems were at each oth-
ers' throats in sprawling Asia.
In other areas there have been
islands of repression where free-
dom of worship as it is known to
most of the West could not be
said to exist.
IN THE WEST appeals have
been sounded by religious leaders
for a closing of ranks, but the
pleas run afoul of old quarrels.
In the United States, for exam-
ple, the age-old debate of Catho-
lics and Protestants over separa-
tion of church and state has flared
anew.
In summary, here is the situ-
ation in which organized relig-
ion finds itself after the blood-
spattered decade which began
with World War II:
Overshadowing all the conflicts
is the struggle in Middle and East
Europe between the Vatican and
the Kremlin.
** *
IN THE TENTH tempestuous.
year of the reign of Pope Pius
XII, the Vatican describes his Ro-
man Catholic Church as "an army
ready for battle," to prevent his
50,000,000 followers behind the
Iron Curtain from being forced
to deny their allegiance.
The Church, striking back in
fury, has excommunicated all
Yugoslavs, all Hungarians, all
Czechoslovaks who willingly took
part in the acts against the
Church which have stirred pro-
tests throughout the Western
World.
The governments of Bulgaria,
Hungary and Romania stand
charged by the Western powers
with violating their peace treaty
by their anti-religious actions.
THE CAMPAIGN against the1
Church in eastern Europe is not
so crude as the ancient persecu-
tions in which Christians were
thrown wholesale to the lions. It

TODAY and
SATURDAY!

BIN. COSB
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Also -
DISNEY CARTOON - "SPIRIT OF "49" - NEWS
Coming Sunday! "THE LIFE OF RILEY"

is, rather, a methodical, grinding-
down process apparently aimed
more -at the next generation than
the present one.
Organized religion contends it
offers a rallying point for pos-
sible opposition to Communism.
Thus, the Communists seek to
deprive the Church of followers
by cutting off means of educa-
ting rising generations in church
doctrine.
The drive has been toward gov-
ernment seizure of church schools,
prohibition of church publications,
muzzling of church spokesmen.
There are inescapable indica-
tions, too, of sharp repressions
against the Jews, still not recov-
ered from the awful torture of the
years under Hitler. Jews who fled
eastward to Russia now find them-
selves caught in the middle of
a whirlpool, fearful of those to
whom they had looked in hope for
liberation.
IN THE UNITED STATES, del-
egates to a conference of Ameri-
can Protestants this Spring weigh-
ed the idea of a meeting of top
Protestant and Catholic leaders
in the world in the cause of relig-
ious freedom. The resolution was
tabled, and there has been no
further action.
At Wellesley, Mass., last week,
Prof. John C. Bennett of the
Union Theological Seminary
urged world Congregationalist
leaders to steer clear of the
anti-Communist crusade of the
Roman Catholic hierarchy.
Catholics and Protestants have
been in controversy recently over
government aid to parochial
(Catholic) schools, which some
Protestant groups say violates the
principle of separation of church
and state. The same principle is
violated, these Protestants claim,
by the presence in the Vatican of
a representative of President Tru-
man.
BRITAIN has its share of re-
ligious arguments, although there
is no question of repressions there.
The Vatican often is criticized by
spokesmen of the Church of Eng-
land, and feeling against the
Church of Rome manifests itself
in such ways as the widespread
protest over the visit of Princess
Margaret to the Pope recently.
In Mexico last year there were
outbreaks of Catholic violence
against Protestants, although
Catholic authorities said the Prot-
estant charges in these cases were
overdrawn.
What will be the fate of relig-
ions in China under the conquer-,
ing Communists, only time will
tell. Possibly significant is a re-
port from Communist-ruled Nor-
thern Korea saying a Catholic
bishop, three priests and 27 Cath-
olic brothers have been imprisoned
in a Red campaign against the
church.
a on Gandhi
"Gandhian Philosophy" will be
the topic of a talk by B. K. Kapur,
education officer from the In-
dian Embassy in Washington, 4:15
p.m. today at Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. 1. Requisitions Accepted
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

Air JournalI
The first in the summer series
of The Michigan Journal of the
Air will be presented at 2:30 to-
day over WUOM and WKAR.
The program will feature an in-
terview of Elaine Giddings, who
has just returned from Africa and
is now doing graduate work at
the University.
OTHER ITEMS on the program
will include the job picture for
graduating seniors, the summer
stock theater, and an unusual
story about bald heads and a
sacret formula.
The series is under the direction
of Giraud Chester, visiting profes-
sor from Queens University in
New York. This week's script was
written by Leroy Eitzen, Grace
Vandenberg, Pres Holmes, and Da-
vid S. Pollock.
The program will be enacted by
Mary Lou Bramwell, Jack Fritz,
Grace Vandenberg, Morris Winer,
Walter Boughton, Robert Haw-
kins, Patricia O'Leary, Richard
Sultzbach, George Tuck, Roger
Wilcox, and Robert Thompson.
DuPont Is Hit
As Monopoly
CHICAGO - (M)-The Federal
government has added the huge
Du Pont industrial empire to a
growing list of large companies it
has charged with monopolizing the
nation's business.
A civil suit filed in Federal Dis-
trict Court accused the E. I. Du-
Pont De Nemours Co., Wilmington,
Del., of monopolistic practices and
asked that it be divorced from
General Motors Corp., and the
United States Rubber Company
of New York.
FILED BY the governmnet's
Anti-Trust Division, the suit
charges the three films violated
the Sherman Act byq making se-
cret rebates and by dividing sev-
eral fields of manufacturing
amongst themselves to eliminate
competition.
The suit named as defendants:
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours, Gen-
eral Motors, U.S. Rubber, Chris-
tiana Securities Co., Delaware
Realty and Investment Corp.,
Pierre S. Du Pont, Lammot du
Pont, Irenee du Pont, and all
members of the du Pont family
related by blood or marriage to
Pierre, Lammot, or Irenee who
hold voting stock in either U.S.
Rubber, Christiana Securities or
Delaware Realty.
The suit describes Delaware
Realty and Christiana Securities
as "personal holding companies"
of the du Pont family, through
which they gained control of Gen-
eral Motors and U.S. Rubber.

LAST 2 PERFORMANCES

"ON BORROWED TIME"
Friday and Saturday - 8 P.M.
Admissions: $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax mcl.)
Box office open 10 to 8
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

.7

.I

Famous Country Fried
Chicken, Hot Biscuits,
T-Bone Steaks

Jacok.lonii

Black's Country Club
304 S. Main, Chelsea, Mich.
Phone 2-4641 for party reservations.
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AIR-COOLED COMFORT

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for ti

... trips to town, our breeze-
inviting summer suits ..
* SACONY PALM BEACH SUITS
it's a wonderful buy! $25.00
" COOLTIMERS by PRINTZESS
ice-cube cool $25.00
" SURE-SIZED SUITS
for the 5-ft. 4-in. figure and under
$19.95
" GRAFFS PATIO SUIT
with matching blouse $25.00
* WASHABLE TWO-PIECERS in
COTTONS and CORDS from $10.95
Sizes 9 to 15,
10 to 44, 14' 2 to 241/

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Ivel
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AIR-COOLED
comfort.. .

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Ending Friday

IL

STOP IN at Lyon & Healy and
choose the sheet music you
need from the world's largest
selection-music of all kinds
of all publishers.
SHEET MUSIC
Rhapsody in Blue-
George Gershwin ... 2.00
Rhapsodies Hongroises No.2'
Franz Liszt.......... .60
Warsaw Concerto-
Richard Addinsell ... .1.00
Clair de Lune-
Claude Debussy.. ..1.30
Rondo Capriccioso Op. 14-
Felix Mendelssohn ...50
Polonaise Op. 53-
Frederic Chopni........60
Malaguena-
Ernesto Lecuona .......60
CHORAL
Ballad for Americans-
Latouche-Robinson . . .1.00
Elijah-Felix Mendelssohn 1.25
The Messiah-
G. F. Handel.........1.25
Grand Mass in Minor-
Wolfgand Mozart . . . .2.50
BAND, ORCHESTRA
Band-At-Ten-Tion !-
Hindsley. ........1.75
Principles of Orchestration-
Rimsky Korsakow ....5.00
Orchestration-
Cecil Forsyth.........6.00
The Band's Music-Richard
Franko Goldman.....3.00
VIOLIN
Album of Favorite Violin
Solos-Merle J. Isaac
Let Us Have Music for Violin-
Georrr Permon.. 1 .l0

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Fresh as a daisy, our junior-sited
r'lAAARDAV lDLCC

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