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June 25, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. JUNE 25,

.., . ..

New Street
Names May
Replace Old
A 100-year-old puzzle may dis-
appear if a group of crusading
townspeople have their way.
Ann Arbor's City Council last
week asked local citizens to aid
them in finding new names for
two city streets which have caused
much confusion to residents and
local postmen.
* * *
FOURTH AND FIFTH Avenues
are difficult to tell apart from
their cross-town counterparts --
Fourth and Fifth Streets.
All these efforts for changing
the names are not without op-
position from an equally-dis-
turbed portion of the city-those
people living or owning com-
mercial establishments on the
affected streets.
Fifty-two of the Fourth and
Fifth Ave. residents, by petition,
indicated their disapproval of the
proposed move.
EFFORTS TO FIND new iden-
tification for the down-town thor-
oughares has continued neverthe-
less. Mailman Walter E. Schlecht's
complaints originally brought
about the movement to change
the names.
Suggestions already turned in to
the Council includes Temple for
Fourth Ave. The Masonic Temple
is located on that street.

'U' Professors Help Design
New Great Lakes Freighter

4

By JO~iN NEUFELD
Whenthe steamer Wilfred Sykes
is launched next Tuesday, it will
be the "biggest and fastest boat"
bringing ore across the Great
Lakes, according to Prof. Charles
W. Spooner, Jr.
Prof. Spooner and Prof. Louis A.
Baier, both of them marine engi-
neers (Prof. Baier is chairman of
the naval architecture and marine
engineering department) were
consulted by the company which
built the freighter.
THEY HELPED determine the
hull form, amount of power, type
of power plant used, the detailed
design of the propellor, and sim-
ilar items. They based their plans
on experiments performed prev-
iously in the University's water
tank, which was recently extended
to a length of 400 ft.
"A larger boat," said Prof.
Spooner, "makes freight cheaper
to haul." But there are limita-
tions.
The length is limited by the
maneuvering that must be done
in rivers, especially around the
Soo; draft is determined by the
water depth; the beam is deter-
mined by loading and unloading
facilities, and economics dictates
the speed, he explained.
* * *

in general, so that practicality, not
prestige is important in freight
carriers.
According to Prof. Spooner,
the Wilfred Sykes is the first
bulk carrier to be launched since
1943. Of other types, the so-
called super-boats are the larg-
est, with a 614 ft. keel length,
and a 14,500 ton capacity.
Compared to this, the Wilfred
Sykes is 678 ft. long and will
carry 21,150 long tons of ore down
the lakes. It has a 70 ft. beam
and a 16 knot service speed.
(A long ton, according to Web-
ster, is the same as a gross ton,
a shipper's ton or a shipping ton,
and is equivalent to 2,240 lb. avoir-
dupois. A knot is one nautical mile
per hour.)
Both Prof. Baier and Prof.
Spooner will attend the launching
at Lorain, Ohio. Prof. Spooner
calls the launching of a freighter
similar to that of passenger ships.
Champagne will be used, but
Prof. Spooner does not know what
brand.

HARVARD'S SWEET GIRL GRADUATES-7Four young women sit on steps of Widener library after
receiving their medical degrees (June 23) at Cambridge, Mass., first ever awarded to women in the
161-year history of the Harvard medical school. Recipients are (left to right) Shirley M. Gallup of
Cranston, R.I.; Doris R. Bennett of Framingham, Mass.; Martha K. Caires of Cambridge; and Edith
L. Stone -of Boston. (AP Wirephoto)

Yank Hair Oil
Shiie Spreads
WASHINGTON - (AP) -Yankee
hair oil glistens today on more
Latin American locks than ever
before, the Department of Com-
merce proudly announced.
With sales up a smooth 378 per
cent in the past ten years, the
market's surface scarcely has been
scratched.
Venezuela, Mexico, Cuba, Pan-
ama, Guatemala and Brazil offer
rich potenitial markets for bril-
liantines, tonics, lacquers, sham-
poos, dyes and home permanent-
wave kits, the' department advised
in the latest issue of its publica-
tion "World Trade in Commodi-
ties2'

HCL Trend Up in Detroit

Detroit families found the gen-
eral trend of prices to run a little
higher last month than in 'April,
U.S. Labor Department Consumer
Index statistics reveal.
Fluctuations in prices, the tallies
indicate, followed a definite pat-
tern of higher prices for necessi-
ties and lower prices for luxuries.
Food bills for the average De-
troit family went up 1.5 per cent
during the month ending in mid-
May largely because of unexpected
jumps in prices of fresh fruits,
vegetables, and eggs.
The upswing in prices seems to
be confined to food, however, as
the reports show a general down-

ward movement in costs of both
men's and women's apparel, house
furnishings, bituminous coal, and
miscellaneous goods and services
such as soap and laundering.

$200 Scholarship
The John Blake Memorial
Scholarship has been awarded to
Roger C. Wierenga, Grand Rapids.
Carrying a stipend of $200, the
scholarship is given to graduates
of Grand Rapids Junior College
for study at the University.

HE ADDED that there are no
blue ribbon awards for freighters

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Classified Advertising

ROOMS ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD for summer, excellent food,
FOR RENT men only. Call Hs. Mgr. 5806, 1617
Washtenaw. )21
SINGLE ROOM for Male. 3(?= blocks BUSINESS
from campus. Large hollywood bed. SERVICES
tile shower, cool. $4.50 per week.
5750. 906 Greenwood. )14 THE STUDENT RATES on TIME and
LIFE apnlv only to subscriptions or-

i

LOST'
end
FOUND

LOST-Orange knit purse containing
identification, Betsy Barbour key 404,
money. Lost 2nd floor main library
Monday. Call Betsy Barbour 2-2591.
)15
LOST-Glasses in brown leather case,
between Cambridge-Forest and Wi-
kel's. Call Ann Peterson 2-4433 or
2-0718. )18
Ii

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q' &09
8,500 Names
Addresses und
Phone Numbers
SUMMER
DIRECTORY

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
Michigan League Ballroom

J'

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;r

10:30 A.M.: Sunday Lesson Sermon.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship Service. "A Tonic
for the Times." e
5:30 P.M.:' Summer Vesper in the Social Hall.
Prof. Robert C. Angell will speak on "Chris-
tianity in a Mass Society." Discussion and
Buffet Supper follows at 6:30 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship. Nursery for
children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
6:30 P.M.; Student Guild. Buffet supper at the
Guild House. Discussion of "The Christian
Faith in Our Summer's Experience.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 10:00: Bible Study.
Sunday at 11:00: Worship Service, with sermon
by the pastor, "Girt about With Truth."
Sunday at 5:30: Supper and meeting of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
N. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by break-
fast for Students, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Summer Church School (through
second grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
John Burt, Chaplain to Episcopal Students.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:00 P.M.:' Canterbury Club leavs for a picnic
supper meeting with swimming, a religious
discussion and campfire worship service. Meet
at Canterbury House, 218 No. Division.
Wednesday, (St. Peter) 7:15 A.M.: Holy Com-
munion (followed by breakfast for Students at
Canterbury House).
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open House Tea,
Canterbury House.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
8:30 A.M.: Breakfast at the Student Center.
9:10 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center.

E s-oI .. E- mk r A l.-V1 I - JI

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