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June 24, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JU 4 A, 1949.

Osborn's Hit Will,
Open Play Season

turns to claim the boy's grand-
mother. Reappearing shortly after
Granny's death, Mr. Brink is
chased up an apple tree by
Gramps, who is unwilling to leave
Pud.
GRAMPS THEN builds a fence
around the tree, determined to
keep Mr. Brink from taking him
away from his grandson.
Aunt Demetria and the neigh-
bors agree that Gramps is in-
sane and take steps to secure
the adoption of the youngster.
But before legal action can be
consummated, Pul falls from a
tree in a fatal accident.
When it becomes apparent to
Gramps that Pud cannot survive
the fall, he calls Mr. Brink down
from the apple tree so that he
and his grandson might die to-
gether.
* * *
THE PART OF Gramps is taken
by Robert E. Thompson; Mr. Brink
is played by Nafe Katter; Ann
Husselman portrays Aunt Deme-
tria; and Lillian Canon Boland
is Granny.
Eric Arnesen, who also attends
the Eberbach School, is the sec-
ond youngster in the play, por-
traying BilleMartin. Others in
the cast are Jane Lensenmeyer,
Ted Heusel, Jim Bob Stephen-
son, Frank Bouwsma, William
W. Taylor, Pres Holmes and J.
Sheldon Murphy.
Direction is by Claribel Baird,
associate professor of speech.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Michigan League box office, from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily.

CoplonSays
Soviet Trip
Considered
WASHINGTON. - VP) - Judith
Coplon conceded today that she
inquired repeatedly about visiting
Russia in the Spring of 1948, a
year before the FBI seized her for
allegedly stealing government se-
crets intending to aid Moscow.
Under questioning, Miss Coplon
said she did inquire about the pos-
sibility of visiting Russia "in an
objective sense to see what it was
like and not because I was in love
with the country."
Then, catching the implication
of Kelley's questions, she said
quickly that a curiosity to see
what Russia is like was different
than going to live there.
MISS COPLON said she dis-
cussed the idea with William E.
Foley, her chief when she worked
in the Justice Department, but
Foley advised her against it.
In her third successive day
under cross-examination, Miss
Coplon again showed the strain
of her ordeal by repeatedly cry-
ing out that the Government is
not giving her a fair chance to
defend herself.
She protested bitterly that Kelly
kept asking her questions which
she could not answer by a mere
"Yes" or "No." In reply to most
questions, she made long answers.
"I FEEL that I'm kept in a
strait-jacket," she said angrily at
one point.
Kelley questioned Miss Cop-
Ion at length about her acknowl-
edged desire to see what went
on" behind the Soviet Iron Cur-
tain," as she put it.
But with even more painstaking
attention, the Federal attorney
dwelt on the story of one hour-
a minute-by-minute account of
what happened in uptown Man-
hattan on the night of last Feb.
18-and its possible connection
with an "old Soviet spy trick."
According to Kelley, one dodge
used by Russian spies was this: If
they failed to make connections
the first time, "to go away and
come back in an hour."
Kelley did not elaborate, but the
purpose would obviously be to di-
vert suspicion or throw any coun-
ter-spies off the track.
Miss Coplon, who has testified
she read "thousands" of FBI re-
ports in her job as a former Jus-
tice Department analyst, said she
never heard of such a thing.
WILLOW RUN
CARRIER
WANTED
for
The Michigan Daily
GOOD PAY
Apply at the
Circulation Dept.,
Student Publications Bldg.
Ann Arbor

Dr, Esson Gale Directs
Campus Foreign Office

. ..

_,

THE OPENING OF THE
eehthahihIt2 £tudka

MONDAY, JUNE 27th

Alger Hiss Disclaims
Delivering Documents

INVESTIGATION ORDERED-
James V. Hunt (above) was
named as a "management coun-
selor" in a. newspaper which
charged him with accepting $1,-
000 for help in getting govern-
ment contract. Hunt was war-
time lieut.-colonel, later served
as a War Assets Administration
official. Investigation was or-
dered by Senate subcommittee,
WAA and Secretary of Defense
Johnson.
Lowly Flies
Spoil Many a
Summer ]Eve
Shoo, fly, ya bother me!
The common housefly bothers
most of us, but it bothers others
to the tune of typhoid, dysentery,
tuberculosis and cholera, which
these little insects have been
known to carry.
This hairy beast can do any-
thing from looking in all direc-
tions at once to walking on ceil-
ings as well as in butter, on milk,
bread, and other delectable ed-
ibles.
AND WHAT'S MORE, he'll go
where no self-respecting animal
will venture - in garbage cans,
manure piles and other unclean
places. They multiply like shmoos
in places like this.
Tiny hairs on the legs of the
fly pick up bacteria, and when
the fly enters the house, it con-
taminates everything it touches.
Another common enemy of
long-suffering humans is the blow-
fly or flesh-fly, which is metallic
blue or green and much larger
than the housefly, and packs a
bigger punch when he bites.
* *
THE BEST WAY to keep flies
in check is to keep them from
breeding. But every one should be
executed on sight, too.
Some of the ways to control
flies are:
On farms, new manure can
be spread thinly over fields so
that any eggs or young maggots
presept may be killed by the
dryness, heat or cold.
Garbage cans should have close-
fitting covers and should be emp-
tied and washed often.
Screens protect open windows
quite effectively, and screen doors
that open out are best.
No amount of care is enough to
vanquish this devil in disguise be-
cause he is such a prolific pro-
ducer. But these hints can greatly
control him, and protect persons,
animals and other extraneous liv-
ing matter from this great sum-
mer menace.
wi

By PHOEBE FELDMAN
International Center might be
called the University of Michi-
gan's "foreign office."
At least that's the way it's char-
acterized by its director, Dr. Es-
son M. Gale.
* * *
"THE CENTER is like a seis-
mograph that records every po-
litical or financial earthquake
throughout the world," Dr. Gale
notes.
Whether it's in Afghanistan
or New Zealand, we hear about
it through the students that
come to us for help."
In helping students, Dr. Gale
finds his "omnivorous appetite"
for languages a valuable asset. A
good speaking ' vocabulary in
French, German and Chinese;
plus "dabblings'" in Japanese,
Korean, Russian and Italian, and
a solid Philips Scholarship back-
ground of Latin and Greek, are
the nine tongues Dr. Gale admits
to his language list.
.. * *
HE HAS ALSO had occasion to
give a speech in Turkish at a
Turkish student banquet, but he
says that doesn't put Turkish in
his vocabulary, smiling that "the
speech was very well rehearsed
beforehand."
According to Dr. Gale his in-
terest in Oriental languages can
probably be traced to an uncle
who served as a missionary edu-
cator in Korea.
It was he who first got Dr. Gale
started traveling on the road to
the Far East.
,- * *
IN 1908, DR. GALE received his
master's degree from the Univer-
sity and later he went on to take
a doctorate from the University
of Leyden, in Holland.
Still concentrating on the
Orient, Dr. Gale did his thesis
on Chinese literature, interpret-
ing and translating classical
Chinese works.
Dr. Gale's interest in all things

Oriental early won him a position
with the U.S. foreign office, and
he soon traveled to China to act
as interpreter for the Peking Le-
gation there.
DURING THE following years,
he found himself an eye-witness
to much of modern Chinese his-
tory. He was living in Shanghai
during the fall of Manchu Dyn-
asty in the 1911 revolution, and
later found himself in Hankow
when Gen. Chiang-Kai-Shek took
over.
His experience in Far Eastern
affairs finally led to his inclu-
sion in the Chinese government
itself, and three years after the
revolution, he became advisor to
the Chinese government, help-
ing to reorganize the adminis-
tration of the salt-tax-a prin-
cipal source of Chinese govern-
ment income since ancient
times.
In 1927, Dr. Gale came home,
and soon went to the University
of California to organize and dir-
ect the Department of Oriental
Languages there.
PREVIOUSLY, he made a year's
stay here at the University to serve
as visiting professor on the Far
East.
The last war found him in
Chungking and India, working
as chief representative of the
office of the Coordinator of In-
formation (parent organization
to the OWI and the OSS), and
six years ago, he settled down
in the chair of the University
International Center Director.
Commenting on the way things
turned out, Dr. Gale remarked,
"if I had been consciously pre-
paring myself to serve as coun-
selor to foreign students at the
University of Michigan, I could-
n't have devised for myself a more
appropriate background of exper-
ience."

(Continued from Page 1)
tall as the over 6 feet powerfully
built Murphy and declared that
he had seen Jones outside the
courtroom on Wednesday.
McLean produced the machine
by tracing it to the Washington
home of Ira Lockey. Lockey tes-
tified that McLean had paid him
$15 for the typewriter. a
* * *
OTHER WITNESSES for the
defense yesterday were Charles
Fahy, legal advisor to the State
Department who testified that
Hiss' reputation for integrity and
loyalty was "excellent," and Mal-
colm Cowley, author and reviewer,
who described a 1940 meeting with
Chambers.
Cowley stated that Chambers
contacted him in connection
with an article for Time Maga-

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zinc dealing with "writers who
had jumped off the Moscow Ex-
press."
Recalling a luncheon conversa-
tion; Cowley said that Chambers
described himself as a former
Communist whowas glad he had
been a member of the Party be-
cause "I learned their methods
and I am now going to use. these
methods again them."
* * *
COWLEY declared that Cham-
bers told him of several men in
the government who were Commu-
nists, including Francis Sayre, but
said that Hiss' name was not men-
tioned. In answer to questions by
the defense, Cowley said that he
did not know Hiss and has never
met him.
Hiss will continue his testimony
when the trial resumes at 10:30
a.m. today,

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