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August 08, 1949 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-08

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PAGE TWELVE "
Engineers
To Publish
'Technic'
Magazine Called
'EngineBible'
The Michigan Technic, fondly
known around engineering circles
as the "Engineer's Bible," is pub-
lished once a month by students
of the College of Engineering.
Featured in its pages are scien-
tific articles and stories on engin-
eering experiments and work by
graduate students, as well as go-
ings-on of the school.
FACULTY MEMBERS and En-
gineering alumni often write for
the magazine, which is the oldest
publication on campus and also
the father of engineering college
magazines.
Editing, photography, leg work
and ad selling are done by a staff
of engineers.
Technic managers for next year
are: Lex Herrin, '50E, editor-in-
chief; Harvey Schatz, '50E, man-
aging editor; Dick Humes, '50E,
associate editor; and Bob Giglio,
'50BAd, business manager.
ONE OF THE FEW college en-
gineering magazines in the coun-
try that is financially indepen-
dent, the Technic has received
many top awards in the annual
Engineering College Magazines
Association Competition.
With at least nine copies fat-
ed to come off the presses this
year, the editors hope to prove
beyond a doubt, that engineers
are literate.
One of the more familiar sights
on campus last year was the make-
shift booth which graced the en-
trance to the Engineering Arch
whenever the Technic went on
sale.
"A BOOTH LIKE that really be-
longs behind a farmhouse," one
passer-by was heard to comment.
But members of the Technic
staff paid no heed and remained
deeply attached to their weak
excuse for a magazine stand.
But in the middle of the year
tragedy struck, as the booth dis-
appeared, abducted by mysterious
robbers. Engineering stalwarts of
the long-standing Engineer-Law-
yer feud reported that -several law
books were found at the scene of
the crime.

I

THE MICHIGAN hAUX

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;T 8, 1949

9

Studying Like Mad!

IDLE STUDENTS-Students with nothing to do before finals
-settle down for an afternoon of study at the library. The first coed
is watching the photographer, who made a playful pass at her
Gargoyle. (Later, he got it but she tackled on the front steps.)
*I * * *
Gargoyle To Publish
This Fall-Despite All

Get'Ensian
Order Quick,
EditorSays
1950 Yearbook
To Be 500 Pages
"Put your order in early for the
1950 Michiganensian yearbook, if
you want to be sure of getting
one."
That is the advice of Ensian
Managing Editor Jeanne Johnson,
'50, as she and the annual staff
begin their duties.
ADDITIONAL SPACE in 1950's
proposed super - large, 500 - page
book will be devoted to more sports
pictures and better coverage of
University activities, Miss John-
son reports.
Appointments for senior pic-
tures may be made during the
first week of school with the ac-
tual photography scheduled for
the initial three weeks of Octo-
ber.
Assisting Miss Johnson on the
Editorial Staff are Associate Edi-
tors Pete Craighead and Lynn Gu-
tenberg, Art Director Barbara
Henry, and Photography Chair-
man Bud Rauner.
EDITORS IN CHARGE of the
book's six subdivisions are Martie
Armstrong, Features; Dick Mc-
Williams and George Gilooly,
tennberg Art Director Barbara
Sally Mitts, Senior Pictures;
Jeanne Schreider, Schools and
Colleges; - Pat McLean and Don
Sigman, Organizations; and aPul-
ine Kleckner, House Groups.
First appearing in 1897, the
Michiganensian has been going
strong ever since. Originally sell-
ing for one dollar, the first book
was a joint work by members of
three then-existing magazine
staffs on the campus-Literary
and Engineering, Law and In-
dependent. Members of the Law
School Magazine suggested the
merger into a single, all-campus
issue.
Although not very successful in
the beginning, the combined year-
book soon caught the students'
fancy and began making money.

i

Daily Seeks New Staffers

* * *

* * *

Gargoyle (humor magazine
since 1906), "will continue pub-
lication this fall," Garg editors
announced from Eastern Somali-
land, where they had taken up
temporary headquarters.
Meanwhile, in Ann Arbor stu-
dents continued riots that had
disrupted campus life for more
than six months.
* * *
ONCE AGAIN they stormed the
barricaded Garg offices in vain
attempts to get their twenty-five
cents back. Inside, fearful Garg
writers huddled together hoping
to devise some means to escape
students.
Frantic University officials
failed to restore order as their
last platoon of special police
were cut to typewriter ribbons.
Students milling about carried
placards: "We don't want six Gar-
goyles each year."
AND "FOUR OUT of five girls
are beautiful and the fifth goes
to Michigan and works on the
Gargoyle."
But the latest word from So-
maliland which came in on the
leg of a very bald eagle was that
editor Brian Duff is grimly de-

termined to publish despite "hell
and high halfbacks!"
He said the Gargoyle would
continue to print renewed and
guaranteed jokes, short fairy tales
and cartoons.
. *
HE HOPED the magazine would
win for the second year the prized
Oliver "Daddy" Warbucks Award
for being outstanding-in the rain.
The reward is sent in a small
bundle containing $100,000,000 in
gold bullion and an Orphan Annie
Magic Decoder Whistle.
Gargers also anticipate a year
unparalleled in campus history
since 1928, when the business
manager, a woman, had an af-
fair with a Chimpanzee.
It (the affair) was luridly de-
scribed in serial form under the
title, "Untouched by Human
Hands."

Posts Open
On Business,
EditorStaffs
Tryout Training
To Start in Fall
The Daily's semi-annual call for
students to man the editorial,
sports, women's and business staffs
will go out the first week of the
fall semester.
Any student who is a second-
semester freshman or higher and
is scholastically eligible to partici-
pate in extra-curricular activities
may work on The Daily.
Students interested in the re-
porting and writing angle of the
newspaper field will go through a
semester's training program where
they will learn the fundamentals
of news gathering, writing, head-
line writing and proof reading.
IN THE SPRING they will be
assigned a regular 'beat" where
they will report the activities of
some branch of the University or
the city.
Many of them will become
members of the Junior staff
where they will be responsible
for putting o&ut one edition each
week.
- * * *
DAILY STAFFERS who have
gone into the newspaper field with
the background and training they
received here are filling top posts
as reporters and editors all over
the country.
Students interested in sports
writing will join The Daily's
sports staff and help report all
local events as well as 'away"
football, baseball, basketball and
hockey games.
Chances for advancement on
the Women's Staff of The Daily
are excellent. The women's staff
edits a page each day, covering
campus social and feminine activ-
ities.
* * *
THE DAILY'S business staff,
runs its own training program for
students interested in practical
training in advertising, layout, de-
sign, circulatio nand business pro-
cedure.
After a training period, new
business staffers will begin "chas-
ing" advertisements from local
merchants. This staff offers ex-
cellent chances to learn business
operations whether or not the stu-
dent is interested in newspapers.

1 __

HOME OF THE DAILY, MICHIGANENSIAN AND GARGOYLE
Daily Begins 60th Year of Publication

1

r

The Michigan Daily begins its
60th year of continuous self-sup-'
porting publication this fall as
one of the outstanding college
daily newspapers in the country.
"The latest deadline in the
state" tradition is carried on by
over 200 students in the news and
editorial, sports, women's, and
business staffs. The Student Pub-
lications Building, home of The
Daily, was built from the paper's
funds in 1931.
ASSOCIATED PRESS wire ser-
vice assures Daily reader s of full
international and national news
and complete coverage of campus
and city news keeps students in-
formed on local happenings.
Recent addition of a photo
engraving machine affords The
Daily's nearly 8,000 readers
clear, accurate and speedy pho-
tography.
Interested students including
eligible second semester freshmen
can join The Daily Try-out staff
+ and learn proofreading, headline
writing and the essentials of news-
writing.
AFTER A SEMESTER on the
Try-out staff, the next step is the
Sophomore staff where regular
news beats are checked and fur-
ther experience in newswriting is
gained.
Each year promotions are
made to the Junior staff with
seven night editors appointed,
each responsible for one night's
edition of The Daily. Following
a year on the Junior staff, ap-
pointments are made to the
Senior staff which includes the
Managing Editor, City Editor,

students on The Daily Business
staff which handles all advertis-
ing and business affairs of the
newspaper.
* * *
THE WOMEN'S STAFF keeps
the campus posted on current so-
cial events and the Sports staff
maintains a thorough coverage of
University athletic events both in
Ann Arbor and out-of-town.
The Daily is under thensuper-
vision of the Board in Control

of Student Publications with
the sponsorship of the Univer-
sity. All questions of policy and
publication have been tradi-
tionally left entirely to the all-
student editorial staff.
Letters to the Editor are one
of the most widely read features
of The Daily Any student may
address a letter to the Editor, not
to exceed 300 words, and present
his views ona current problem or
controversy.

* - *

A

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®'I!

Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students of the University, of.Michigan,
under the authority of the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise credited to this newspaper. All
rights of republication of all other matters herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Mich., as second class mail matter.

Try our
STUDENT BUNDLE
THIS SERVICE gives you Shirts, Hand-
kerchiefs, and Wool Sox beautifully fin-
ished. All other wearing apparel washed
sparkling clean, fluff dried, and folded
ready to wear
Priced at a real- saving
over the all-finished service.
COMPLETE DELIVERY SERVICE
Kyer Model Laundry

I

H -

GREETING CARDS
HUMOROUS & GENERAL
Complete Line for all occasions

GIFT WRAPPING
Notes and Lett
Officee Equipr
215 E. Liberty - Pho

Editorial Staf Business Staff Blimey Limeys Editorial E
& RIBBON B. S. Brown....... Co-Managing Editor Robert C. James....Business Manager sociate edi
Craig Wilson.......Co-Managing Editor Dee Nelson........Advertising Manager PENZANCE, Eng.-English sailors Valuablee
Pres Holmes........... Sports Co-Editor James McStocker..Finance Manage
eret es Merle Levin..........Sports Co-Editor Ethel Ann Morrison... Circulation gr acquired the name "limeys" back
Miriam Cady...........Women's Editor Bess Young.................Librarian in the 1700's when British seamen Flat Do
Staff: John Barbour, Martha Bazar, David Belin, Jack Bergstrom, Pa carried crates of limes on their
y Brentlinger, Pat Brownson, Nancy Bylan, Phyllis Cohen, Ray, Collins, Bill er flmso hi COOKSTC
nent Co Connolly, Ricky Cross, Dale Danenberg, Brian Duff, Edward Elioj, Joe Epstein, ships, according to maritime his- roller rolling
Mervin Ezray, Eliot Gerber. Larry Gustafson, Peter A. Hotton, Joanne Ketelhut, tory. ed which fi
inc 21213Bob Kinoshita, Herbert Kravitz, Norman Mangouni, Betty Moncrieff, John Neu-
)ne 2-1213feld, Ted Papes, Jim Parker, Alice Platt, Margorie Reubene, Arlynn Rosen, Herb The citrus fruit was carried to form thickn
Rovner, Bob Sandell, Kenneth Scobie gDon Sigman, Ia Sussman, JoeTannen-
Sbaum, Harold Tanner, Bob Vokac, Virginia Von Schon, Leonard Wilcox. ward off scurvy on board ship, cal gadget cc

Editor, and four as-
tors.
experience is afforded
gh
OWN, N.J-A multi-
g pin has been perfect-
lattens dough to uni-
ess, according to a lo-
oncern.

627 South Main
Phone 4185
State 1215

814 South5

South Univ.

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(Tlr Ifidirtigalt :Bailt
offers PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE to Students
in

LAW

B OOKS

1

I

Reporting,
Organization and
Analysis of News
The Michigan Daily offers tryouts
exceptional opportunities to gain
practical training and experience
in newswriting, feature writing,
headline writing, page make-up
and editorial work. All eligible
second-semester freshmen, sopho-
mores and upperclassmen inter-
ested in trying out for The Daily
editorial staff should attend a
meeting to be held at the begin-
ning of the fall semester. No
previous experience is necessary.

Advertising Layout
and Design
The advertising department of
The Michigan Daily offers you an
excellent opportunity to acquire
practical experience in the field
of Advertising Layout and De-
sign. If you have had no previous
training you will be given free in-
struction. If you have had class-
room training, you will test your
ability with actual practice. You
can obtain business experience
and personal contact with ad-
vertisers that you can secure no
other way.

You will find our store

p
specs-,

ally equipped to supply you

with law

case

books and sup-

Radio and
Photographic Fans!
We specialize in equipment and
supplies for the Radio Amateur
and Camera Enthusiast. All stan-
dard lines stocked.
Our store is convenient to campus.
Come in and get acquainted.

L4

plies. Our law section is staff-
ed by law students to assist yOU
on your requirements.
Veterans' Accounts Capably Handled

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