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August 07, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-07

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 1940*

H~E MICIIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

a

M' Gridders Start'
PracticeAugust 31
25 Lettermen Among Candidates
Receiving Invitations to Early Drills

Yanls Edge

Browns, Lengh ten Lead

By NORMAN MANGOUNI
Daily Special Writer
A field of 67 candidates for the
University of M1ichigan varsity
football team has been invited to
report for fall practice beginning
' Aug. 31.
In the 21 practice days remain-
ing before the opener with Michi-
gan State College on Sept. 24,
Head Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
faces the task of rebuilding the
Wolverines' 1948 National cham-
pionship squad and furthering a
winning streak that reached 23
straight last year.
OOSTEIRBAAN will start with
a list of 25 lettermen-2 from last
year's undefeated team and two
from the 1945 outfit.
Sophomores and members of
K last year's reserve squad make
up the remaining group of 44
p~layers.
Problems confronting Ooster-
Pros Finish
First Round
Of Tam' Pla y
CHICAGO-(P)-Harry Todd of
Dallas, Tex., knocking brilliant
t approaches for a seven-under-par
65, yesterday barged within a
stroke of Friday's pacesetter, Lloyd
Mangrum, as the first round of
the $20,000 All-American Profes-
sional tourney ended.
Todd, whose moqt recent bid to
fame was the Ozark Open he won
last fall at Springfield, Mo.,
banged home eight birdies to fin-
ish two taps ahead of leading
money-winner Sammy Snead and
Bill Nary of Los Angeles, who had
67's.
A THRONG of 7,000 wandered
over gaily-bedecked Tam O'Shan-
ter course as some 120 tardy start-
ers rushed after eight-under-par
64 Mangrum posted in yesterday's
first installment of the opening
round.
The actual third spot holders,
ahead of Snead and Nary, were
Chick Harbert and Jim Turnesa,
who fashioned 66's yesterday.
In the concurrent All-American
Amateur and women's open com-
petition, the day's top finishers
also failed to dislodge yesterday's
pace-setters.
The best amateur today with a
modest par-equalling 72 was Ray
Chamberlin of Waukan, Ill. That
was five strokes behind the 67
fashioned yesterday by Julius
Boros of West Hartford, Conn.,
and Chicago's John (Pick) Wag-
ner. And it was good for only
fifth spot behind the 68 fired
yesterday by Al Besseling of Chi-
cago and defending champion
Frank Stranahan's 70.

baan are virtually the same as
they were in Spring practice-the
development of an offensive line
and a replacement for brilliant
Pete Elliott at quarterback.;
* * *
HOW FAR THE famed "two-
unit" system introduced two years
ago by H. O. "Fritz" Crisler will,
prevail, is another question to be
answered in the early practice ses-
sions. Oosterbaan has indicated
that he will carry it out if prac-
tical.
Missing from last year's squad
are such stars as Dick Rifen-
burg and Ed McNeill, ends; Joe
Soboleski and Ralph Kohl, tack-
les; Dom Tomasi and Stu Wil-
kins, guards; Elliott, the quar-
terback; and Gene Derricotte,
defensive halfback.
Capt. Al Wistert, 34-year-old
All-American tackle, heads the list
of returning lettermen from the
1948 squad. Included are Char-
les Ortmann, Leo Koceski, Walter
Teninga, Charles Lentz, Bob Van
Summern, Tom Peterson, Dick
Kempthorn, Don Dufek, Bill Bart-
lett, John Ghindia, Harry Allis,
OswaldhClark, Bob Hollway, Irv
Wisniewski, Al "Brick" Wahl, Jim
Atcheson, Bill Ohlenroth, Lloyd
Heneveld, Al Jackson, Don Mc-
Clelland, Bob Erber and Dick Far-
rer.
Returning from the 1945 squad
are Tony Momsen and Gene Hin-
ton, who spent the interim in 4he
service.
* *.*
THE INVITATION list by posi-
tion follows:
ENDS - Harry Allis, Oswald
Clark, Bob Hollway, Irvin Wis-
niewski, Tom Kelsey, George Suth-
erland, Bob Dingman, Jim Scala,
Ed Grenkowski, Fred Pickard, Les
Popp, Dave Raye.
TACKLES - Al Wistert, Al
Wahl, Jim Atcheson, Bill Ohlen-
roth, Art Dunn, Leo Flynn, Gene
Hinton, Tom Johnson, John Mc-
Intyre, Dick McWilliams, Ralph
Stribe, Rostum Tandiourian, John
Hess.
GUARDS-Lloyd Heneveld, Don
McClelland, Al Jackson, Joe Beel,
Charles Cerecke, Al Fitch, Pete
Kinyon, John Powers, Bill Stapp,
John Padgen, Otto Robinson,. Gil
Smith.
CENTERS - Bob Erben, Tony
Momsen, Carl Kreager, Harry
Smalley.
QUARTERBACKS - Bill Bart-
lett, John Ghindia, Pete Palmer
Rodger Ely, Bill Pudit, Bob Knode.
HALFBACKS - Charles Ort-
mann, Leo Koceski, Wally Tenin-
ga, Bob Van Summern, Charles
Lentz, Jim Eldridge, Don Peter-'
son, Jerry Burns, Bill Jennings,
Russell Osterman, Prentiss Ryan,
Reggie Sauls, John Wilcox.
FULLBACKS - Tom Peterson,
Dick Kempthorn, Don Dufek,
Norm Jackson, Ralph Straffon,
Amato Contino.

All-Star Tilt
To Start '49
Grid Season
CHTCAGO-(/)-A determined
and talented band of college all-
stars will trot into Soldier Field
Friday night seeking revenge from
the National Football League in a
battle which will kick off the 1949
gridiron season.
The occasion is the 16th annual
scrap between the all-Stars and
the National Football League
champions-this year the Phila-
delphia Eagles. The advance tick-
et sale indicates a crowd of around
100,000 persons will be on hand.
* * *
THE SQUAD OF 70 collegians,
coached by Bud Wilkinson of Ok-
lahoma, will seek to wipe out the
28 to 0 trimming handed last
year's All-Stars by the Chicago
Cardinals, then national pro league
champs.
Wilkinson has a flock of
standout backs and linemen to
throw at the Eagles in "split-T"
and regular "T" formations.
But he is worried about hisde-
fense. He pointed out his stars
must stop Steve Van Buren, who
sparheads the Eagles' running at-
tacks, and also must play flawless
defense against the passing of
Tommy Thompson.
The starting offensive and de-
fensive lineups of the stars will
not be named until the final prac-
tice next Thursday. Among line-
men expected to get a chance to
stop Van Buren and the Eagles
are Bill Fischer and Marty Wen-
dell of Notre Dame; Al Derogatis,
Duke; Barney Poole, Mississippi;
Chuck ~ Bednarik, Pennsylvania;
Alex Sarkisian, Northwestern;
Dick Harris and George Petrovich,
Texas; Phil O'Reilly, Purdue; and
Goble Bryant and Joe Steffy,
Army.
Stuart Breaks
Swim Record
At Mackinac
ST. IGNACE, Mich. - (P) - A
husky mathematics student from
the University of Michigan, Wal-
ter Stewart, 26, San Diego, Calif.,
churned through four miles of
chilly, choppy water to win the
Straits of Mackinac swim yester-
day.
Stewart captained the Wolver-
ine swimming team during the
1944 season.
Stewart, winner of several dis-
tance grinds on the west coast, set
a new record with a time of two
hours, one minute, 21 seconds.
Dave Pushman of Detroit won last
year in two hours, 22 minutes, sev-
en seconds.

NEW YORK - (A)-The New
York Yankees staged one of their
greatest home run hitting displays
since their pennant winning years
of 1936-39 yesterday, blasting out
ix home runs to edge the St.
Louis Browns, 9-8.
Trailing all the way, the Yanks
won in the ninth inning when
with one out, Tommy Henrich
and Joe DiMaggio belted succes-
sive home runs. DiMaggio's blow
was second of the game and tenth
of the season. Henrich's blast was
his 20th. The other Yank homers
belonged to little Phil Rizzuto who
hit two and squat Yogi Berra. The
Browns piled up an early 8-3 lead,
thanks to home runs by Paul Leh-
ner, Sherm Lollar and Gerry
Priddy.
oGiven Release
By Cleveland
Gene Derricotte, Michigan de-
fensive star has been released by
the Cleveland Browns football
club.
Coach Paul Brown said Derri-
cotte had a chronic knee condition
that only rest could cure. The re-
cently graduated University of
Michigan flash was injured last
week while standing along the
sidelines tossing passes to a team-
mate.
* * *
THE BROWNS' coach said he
would ask for waivers on Derri-
cotte but hoped to have him re-
turn for another trial next season.
"Had he stayed healthy," Brown
added, "Derricotte would have
made the team. He had every-
thing we were looking for-speed,
quick reactions, and intelligence.
Now that Gene is out of the
running, newcomer Les Horvath
may get coach Brown's nod as left
halfback.

THE NINE HOME RUNS fell
one short of tying the major
league record for most home runs
hit a single game by two clubs.
The triumph also increased
the Yanks' American League
margin to four games over the
Cleveland Indians. The Indians
bowed, 2-0, to the Athletics in
Philadelphia.
Dick Fowler scattered eight hits
in out-pitching the Indians' Bob
Lemon. The A's picked up a run
in the second when Wally Moses
singled home Mike Guerra from
second. Guerra tripled home Nel-
son Fox with the final run in the
eighth.
In the only night game schedul-
ed yesterday former Mexican
Leaguer Adrian Zabala turned in
a six hit performance to lead the
New York Giants to 3-1 victory
over the league leading St. Louis
Cardinals.
LEFTY MEL PARNELL became
the first major league pitcher to
win 16 games as he pitched the
red hot Boston Red Sox to a 3-0
triumph over the Detroit Tigers.
The victory was Boston's seventh
straight and their second consecu-
tive shutout over the Tigers.
Parnell checked the Tigers on
five hits, walked only one and
fanned three. Dom DiMaggio
collected two of the sox' nine
hits to -stretch his consecutive
game hitting streak to 33.
The Chicago White Sox edged
the Washington Senators, 6-5, in
a 12-inning battle at Washington.
Doubles by Dave Philley and Cass
Michaels were the deciding blows.
* * *
SHORTSTOP LUKE Appling of
the White Sox played his 2,1'54th
game at that post to break the
previous major league record held
by Rabbit Maranville.
The Cincinnati Reds upset the
National League's pennant con-
tending Brooklyn Dodgers, 5-2.
The Reds scored all of their
runs in the eighth inning with

the aid of three errors by Dodger
third sacker Billy Cox.
Herm Wehmeier went all the
way for the Reds and allowed the
Dodgers four hits in posting his _
seventh victory and fifth straight.
* * *
THE PHILADELPHIA Phillies
edged the Pittsburgh Pirates. 4-3, S
Dick Sisler winning the game inB
the ninth inning with a pinch-N
hit single.
Del Ennis and Andy Seminick P
homeredf or the Phils and DinoP
Restelli and Ralph Kiner for the
pirates. Kiner's blow was his 28th
of the season.
The Chicago Cubs trounced the
Boston Braves, 10-4, to extend
Boston's losing streak to five
games. Hank Sauer socked his
24th homer and Andy Pafko his
14th for the Cubs.
Starting
TODAY

NATIONAL LEAGUE
V L Pet.

Major League Standings

GB'

St. Louis ........62
Brooklyn ........61
New York .......53
Boston ..........52
Philadelphia .....51
Pit tsburgh .......46
Cincinnati .......43
Chicago........39

39
39
48
51
52
54
59
65

.614
.610
.525
.505
.495
.460
.422
.375

1
12
15
19
24

... New"Y
' Clevel
9 Bostor
1 Philad
2 Detroi
54 Chica
912 Wash
4' %St.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L. Pet. G.B.
Fork ........64 37 .634 ...
and ........60 41 .594 4
n ............59 43 .578 512
ielphia. .....56 47 .544 9
.t ..........56 49 .533 10
go ..........43 59 .422 211/2
ington.....36 63 .364 27
ouis ........3.4 69 .330 31

New York 3, St. Louis 1.
New York 3, St. Louis 1.
Chicago 10, Boston 4.
Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3.
Cincinnati 5, Brooklyn 2.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 9, St. Louis 8.
Boston 3, Detroit 0.
Philadelphia 2, Cleveland 0.
Chicago 6, Washington 5.

W11-

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Award
Calibre
of Film!

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Classiied Advertisements

WANTED TO RENT

WANTED - TO RENT
Two-Bedroom House
Two Children, ages 5 and 7.
University Employee
Phone 5539

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FOR RENT

FOR
SALE

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SLIGHTLY USED all walnut dining
room suite. Table, 6 chairs, china
cabinet and server. French design.
Cathedral type all leather chairs. Big
sacrifice for quick sale. Suitable for
fraternities or sororities. Alsoantique
mahogany mirror 28-in. x 44-in. Phone
8428 for appointment. )166
ENGLISH WOMAN'S BIK.E, 2 speed,
basket, good condition. Ph. 2-3315.
167
LaSALLE, 1937, perfect condition, new
paint job, new tires, new rings, newly
overhauled radio and heater, $350.00.
821 Packard, 2-1919. )168
FOR SALE-Record collection LP's and
standard albums. Call Zabrosky 2-
6674. )169
21 x 31 RB SERIES B GRAFLEX cam-
era with sunshade and cloud filter.
$85. 1126 Martin Place. )155
TWO SMALL scatter oriental rugs, very
beautiful and very reasonable. Phone
2-5152. )157
'37 STUDEBAKER 4-door $125. Motor,
brakes, steering recently overhauled.
Call 3YP 4701R. )140
WHY WALK when you can ride? Man's
bike, A-1 condition. Don Lauer, 3-1511,
ext. 2492. )97
SUMMER SPECIALS: Rayon Slacks,
$5.00; Seersucker pants $2.99; U.S.
Navy T-Shirts $.49; Loafers, leather
soles $4.99; Cable knit T-Shirts $1.95;
Men's sport shorts $1.49. Open til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )149
PARRAKEETS make delightful, inex-
pensive pets. Easily trained to talk
and whistle. Also canaries, bird sup-
plies and cages. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 So.
Seventh. )88a
REDUCED PRICES-Men's loafers $3.88;
U.S. Navy T-shirts 49c; wash slacks
$2.66; sport shirts, short-sleeves $1.69;
men's sport shorts $1.49; all wool
swim trunks $1.49. Open 'til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )113
WANTED
ROOM AND BOARD. $14.00 per week.
3 meals, Monday thru Saturday. Din-
ner Sunday (1 p.m.) Sanitary ap-
proved A.A. Health Dept. Phone Mrs.
Peachers, 2-3782. 1009 E. Catherine.
150
WORK--Full time, any kind. Contact
Cal Leedy at 8257. )92
PERSONALS
YOUR LAST CHANCE to take advan-
tage of the special student rates on
TIME, LIFE and FORTUNE. Phone
6007 now. Student Periodical Agency.
)146

ROOM to share for Graduate women.
Fall semester. Approved house. 2-7328.
) 151
LOST
and
FOUND
HELP HELP
To our good friends and customers:
Will you please examine your 35mm
slides and see if you have any strang-
ers among them. Slides belonging to
the Museum of Anthropology have
mysteriously disappeared. We thank
yu for this assistance. Phone 4287.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co. )165
~ ROOMS
FOR RENT
RENT LOW to male student who would
be away from Friday afternoon to
Monday morning. Pleasant front room,
two large closets. Private family. Box
198, Mich. Daily. )158
BUSINESS
SERVICES
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
GROUP PICTURES taken. Candid
wedding pictures a specialty. C. W.
Nichols, 711 S. Division. Ph. 5333.
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
disser Cations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
I!. TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING MONTANA Aug. 13. Riders all
or part way. Dick Byers, 2-4591. )156
RIDERS WANTED to Kansas City.
Leave Friday, Aug. 12. Vincent Bag-,
lione, Ph. 9430, Sat. 6:30-8, anytime
Sun. )164
LEAVING AUG. 13 for So. Dakota.
Room for 3 passengers. Share ex-
penses. Call Lucas 2-9371 eve. )161
PASSENGERS TO SANTE FE via Den-
ver. Lv, Aug. 13, a.m. Steve Jacobs,
2-4591. )162
RIDERS WANTED: To New York. Leave
Saturday morning, Aug. 13. Call
2-4225, 5:30-6:30 p.m. )163
WANTED-Riders to Mass. after exams.
Phone Ypsi. 4327M11 after 6. )159
TRANSPORTATION: Passengers want-
ed to New England August 13. Share
gasoline cost. Box 199, Mich. Daily.
)148

STARTS

WEEKDAYS
35c to 5 P.M.
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CONTINUOUS
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