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July 31, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-31

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OU iTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUTNAY, JULY 31. 1949

AKE-UP MENACE:
Cleaner Solves Lipstick
Problem---For Men Only
4

By MARTHA BAZAR
The next time that femme fa-
tale leaves her red trademarl on
your best suit, don't get glum,
chum.
The cleaner can remove that
pancake make-up and lipstick with
very little difficulty. But the young
lady herself may not be so for-
tunate. For the same chemicals
which banish stains on wool and
other natural fibers often take
along color and material as well,
when they meet up with synthetics
such as rayon.
Since the days when Cleopatra
painted her lids and lashes with
sulphur, woman has stopped at
nothing to improve her looks. The
fact that the ancients used bar-
Mexican Artist
To Talk, Give
Painting Show
Miss Josefina Mesa, Mexican
artist and portrayer of Mexican
regional costumes, will present a
talk about her work at 8 p.m.,
Tuesday, West Gallery, Rackham
Building.
Miss Mesa's paintings will be on
display in the gallery on Monday
and Tuesday.
THE EXHIBIT will consist of
water colors of Mexican costumes
and Mexican scenes.
Miss Mesa is a native of Mex-
ico City. She has been asso-
ciated with the art department
of the University of Mexico, the
Government School of Design,
and the Government Normal for
Teachers.
She is the designer of costumes
for the Mexican Film Industries
and fashion designer for the mag-
azine La Familia.
SMissMesa's Ann Arbor visit is
under the auspices of the Sociedad
Hispanica, the Spanish House,
and the Beta Omicron chapter
of Sigma Delta Pi, national His-
panic Society.
Grad Club To Meet
The Graduate Outing Club will
meet at 2:15 p.m. Sunday at the
northwest entrance of the Rack-
ham Building for its weekly out-
ingAll graduate students are en-
titled to attend these outings.
The group will decide Sunday
where this week's excursion will
go. Edith Kovach, president of the
group, said that the people may
profer to go swimming.
HAIR STYLES
for Women!!
They are shaped and feather-
edged to individual needs. Five
barbers are on our staff who
have had years of experience in
the art of cutting Ladies and
Children's hair. Your approval
is invited.
The DASCOLA BARBERS

ley flour, butter, almonds and va-
nilla (hence the expression Ter-
rific Dish) as well as pumice stone
and lead is not really very shock-
ing. Today's cosmetics are com-
pounded with zinc oxide, glycerin,
ammonia and carbolic acid.
~ * * *
THE LADIES of Elizabeth's
court washed their faces in wine,
and the intoxicating Mary Queen
of Scots played havoc with fi-
nances by bathing in it regularly.
No doubt this is the origin of the
cliche "Drunk with'her Beauty."
However, those not born queens
have through the ages been forced
to settle .for something far less
potent, milk.
Man's protests date back just
as far as woman's cosmetics, and
even in ancient home the phi-
losophers conviemned the fe-
males who kept their faces in
jars.
In eighteenth-century England
it was believed that the matter
warranted serious legislation. Any
woman who it was charged "did
impose upon, seduce or betray into
matrimony any of her Majesty's
subjects by use of artificial teeth,
false hair, paints, hoops, stays,
high heeled shoes or bolsted hips
should incur the penalty of the
law in force against witchcraft
and that the marriage upon con-
viction should stand null and
void."
Quartet Will
Play T uesday
Music by Haydn, Debussy and
Piston will make up the final pro-
gram to be given this summer by
the Stanley Quartet.
The chamber music concert will
take place at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
the Rackham Lecture Hall and is
open to the general public. There
is no admission charge.
* * *
AFTER HAYDN'S "Quartet in
F major, Op. 77, No. 2," Walter
Piston's new piano quintet will re-
ceive its world premiere. The work
was written by the American com-
poser expressly for the Stanley
Quartet. Prof. Joseph Brinkman
will play the piano part.
Prof. Brinkman calls the work
easy to listen to and readily un-
derstandable even at first hearing.
He says it is definitely not ab-
struse.
Piston has promised to be here
for the premiere.
The concluding composition of
the evening will be Debussy's
quartet.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold
Bought'
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. 1. Requisitions Accepted
O. D. nIORRILL
314 South State St.

Minority GroupS
Do People Agree With Their Friends?,
(Continued from Page 1)
The greatest barriers are toward Negroes, next Orientals, Jews,
Latin American, with barriers against contacts with white non-
Jews on the part of the minority groups, being least of all, as
shown in earlier articles. *
THE SURVEY STATISTICS show the same general pattern as
the barriers to social contact.
"This fact suggests the existence of a social atmosphere in
which people feel that they ought to be 'liberal' or 'unprejudiced'
toward members of other groups."
"When they do feel certain hostilities, then, they hesitate to
admit these are feelings of their own. They may feel free, however,
to attribute these feelings to others.
* * * * .
ANOTHER POSSIBLE explanation for the findings exists-
"students may be conforming to a 'fiction,'" study director Eleanor
Maccoby said.
* * * *
"THERE MAY EXIST a genuine 'pluralistic ignorance' in which
people misjudge the nature of the opinion climate in which they are
living."
"Possibly the people most hostile toward minority groups
are the most articulate, so that people know their opinions but
do not know the opinions f other friends with more favorable
attitudes."
"Possibly people avoid talking about subjects which might offend
the more extreme among their social group, and therefore never get
a chance to find out how others feel."
* * * *
THE FOLLOWING FIGURES consider, the respondent and his
friends in terms of dating, rooming with and living in the same house
with members of other groups:
THE STUDENT REPORTS HIMSELF:
Dating Rooming with
members of members of Living in
other groups other groups same house
More favorable than his friends 44% 50% 39%
Same as his friends 40 40 54
Less favorable than his friends 11 7 4
The greatest discrepancies appear in connection with rooming
with members of other groups. Greatest agreement is found on atti-
tudes toward living in the same house with other groups.
"THIS WOULD SUGGEST that barriers against rooming with
menbers of eminority groups are greater than barriers against dating
them-a conclusion not bourne out by other survey findings."
Further analysis of discrepancies between self and friends on
dating or rooming with each minority group is to be undertaken by
the Center.
NEXT: Campus life in relation to minority group attitudes
is studied in "Campus Attitudes Toward Minority Groups."

Michigan Lags
In UNESCO
Leadership
"UNESCO activity in the state
of Michigan has been largely on
the part of individuals.," Prof.
William C. Trow of the Educa-
tion School said.
Prof. Trow explained that over
a dozen states have councils for
UNESCO which organize programs
and relate themselves to local or-
ganizations throughout the state.
* *
"MICHIGAN, so far, has only a
temporary council. Also, there is
only one person from our state on
the National UNESCO Council
which has a membership of 100,"
he said.
"Unlike its leadership in other
activities, Michigan has exerted
no leadership in the field of
UNESCO," Prof. Trow went on.
The situation in relation to the
University is brighter, according
to Prof. Trow.
"Such groups as Lane Hall, the
political science department, the
School of Education, andbthe In-
ternational Center have been ac-
tive in arousing interest in
UNESCO and spreading informa-
tion about it," he commented.
"Most of the representation of
Michigan at the National UNESCO
conference in Cleveland last April
came from the University," he
added.
Governor To Talk
Governor G. Mennen Williams
will speak at a meeting of Demo-
cratic farmers from Washtenaw,
Monroe, and Lenawee counties at
noon, today Wilson Memorial
Park, Milan.
Edward Meade, former member
of the State AgriculturalrCommis-
sion and now administrative as-
sistant to the governor, will ex-
plain the Brannan Farm Plan.
Down Stretch
BROKEN HILL, Northern Rho-
desia-The giraffe developed his
long neck not by reaching up for
leaves, as is commonly supposed,
but by reaching down for grass
and water, according to natural-
ists.

(Continued from Page 2)
Meet at Lane Hall at 5:15 and
travel by. car. Everyone welcome.
Call John Gehring, 2-5275 for res-
ervations.
Events Today
First Presbyterian Church. Wor-
ship Service at 10:45 a.m. Dr.
Lemon will preach on "The Quest
for Certainty."
At the 5:30 p.m. Summer Vesper
Service, Dr. Lemon will lecture on
"Why,. Are We Afraid of Com-
munism?" Supper will follow at
6:30 p.m. in the cool Social Hall.
Wesleyan Guild will meet with
members of the Roger Williams
Guild at 5:30 p.m. in the Wesley
Lounge to hear the Rev. Ronald
Preston, study secretary of the
British Student Christian Move-
ment, discuss "Reasons for Inner
Strength." The Rev. Chester
Loicks will give a devotional mes-
sage. Supper and fellowship will
follow at 6:30 p.m. in the sunken
garden.
Lutheran Student Association:
Bible Hour at the Student Center,
1304 Hill Street at 9:10 a.m. At
5:30 p.m. in Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall Prof. Paul Kauper of the
University Law faculty will speak
on "The Contribution of the
Church to Law." Choir rehearsal
at the Parish Hall at 4:30 p.m.
The Congregational - Disciples
Guild will meet at the Guild House
at 2:30 p.m.l to proceed to Camp
Talahi near Brighton. The pro-
gram will include swimming, a
picnic supper and a worship serv-
ice.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Service Sunday at
11 a.m., with sermon by the Rev.
A. Scheips, "The Helmet of Sal-
vation." Bible study at 10:00 a.m.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club: Meet at the Center,
1511 Washtenaw, Sunday at 2 p.m.
for lake outing and picnic supper.
Canterbury Club: 218 N. Divis-
ion Street, 9 a.m. Holy Commun-
ion, followed by student breakfast1
at Canterbury House.
5 p.m. Picnic and swimming fol-
lowed by religious discussion and
led by Mr. Burt.
University Community Center,
Willow Village. Interdenomina-
tional church service and Sunday
School, 10:45 a.m.
Open House Sunday evening,
7:30 10:30 at the B'nai B'rith Hil-
lil Foundation, 2101 Hill Street.

vDAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Student religious groups are
continuing their summer activities
into the month of August.
Canterbury Club will go to Ken-
nedy's Pond today for a picnic.
Friday afternoon it will hold open
house from 4 to 6 p.m.
CONGREGATIONAL - Disciples
Guild will hold an annual summer
reunion of guild members today
at Camp Talahi.
Guest speaker at the Guild's
regular Wednesday night discus-
sion group will be the Rev. Ron-
ald Preston, study-secretary of
the British Student Christian
Movement.
Friday night the group will go
WPAG To Air,
Fairy Tale
The story of "The# Little Boy
Who Whistled," concerning a
happy lad who wristled in Sleepy-
time where whistling was for-
bidden, will be presented at 6:45
this afternoon over Station WPAG.
It is one of a regular weekly
dramatizations by radio students
in the Department of Speech
heard on Tales from the Four
Winds.
Bob Thompson will direct the
show. Included in the cast are
Bob Hawkins, Jack Fritz, Maxine
Eyestone, Craig Tenney, Don Hall,
Ralph Curtis, and Earl Matthews.

PICNICS, SPFE ECH ES:
Religious Groups Plan
Hot-Weather Activities

on a pancake cook-out at which
everyone brings and cooks his
own.
GAMMA DELTA, the Lutheran
Student Club, has planned a lake
outin,, nd pi'nic supper at In-
dependence Lake for today.
Hillel will hold its weekly open
house tonight from 7 to 10:30 p.m.
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the
law school will address the Luth-
cran Student Association on
"Contribution of the Church to
Lays."
Members of Roger Williams
Guild will return to their sanc-
tuary for Sunday morning serv-
ices. For the past two weeks they
have had to meet elsewhere, as
the sanctuary was being redecor-
ated.
* * *
TONIGHT they will join with
Wesleyan Guild to hear Mr. Pres-
ton speak on "Reasons for Inner
Strength." The joint meeting will
include an outside supper and a
devotional talk by Rev. C. H.
Loucks, pastor of the First Bap-
tist Church.
Students Evangelical Chapel will
have its regular Sunday evening
social after services today.
Westminster Guild will conclude
its summer program today with
a talk by Rev. William P. Lemon
on "Why Are We Afraid of Com-
munism." Dr. Lemon will display
some Russian anti-religious post-
ers.

Al

a

Al

i

z

it, - _ _...._ __.__. _ __ _-- -

III

A-lENE 5

NEW BOOKS
FOR VACATION READING
Balchin--The Borgia Testament
Steen-Twilight of the Floods
Praag-Day Without End
Miller-Death of a Salesman
Schweitzer-Out of My Life and Thought
Churchill-Sinews of Peace
Davis-Beulah Land
Powers-No Wall So High
Also Bargain Books from 9c up
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE

i

HELP WANTED
WANTED - Housekeeper for rectory.
Childless couple, not over 40, with
car. Husband a student or employed
elsewhere. Private apartme t. St.
Patrick's Rectory, Northfield. Phone
Ann Arbor 25-8314. )126
WANTED
WORK-Full time, any kind. Contact
Cal Leedy at 8257. )92
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED - TO RENT
Two-Bedroom House
Two Children, ages 5 and 7.
University Employee
Phone 5539

,M , TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING vicinity Laramie, Wyoming
middle Aug. Riders desired. Ph. 5119.
)127
BUSINESS
SERVICES
STUDENTS MAY ORDER subscriptions
to TIME or LIFE at the student rates
to be sent to their home address or
any other address they choose. As
long as the subscription is in the stu-
dent's name, the Student Hate ap-
plies. Order now-pay when billed.
Student Periodical Agency. Phone
6007. ) 116
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
GROUP PICTURES taken. Candid
wedding pictures a specialty. C. W.
Nichols, 711 S. Division. Ph. 5333.
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 . )1

-*--sl-N

FOR
SALE

MEN'S ROLLFAST BICYCLE in good
condition. See at 119 N. Forest Ave. or
° call 2-8612 after 5 p.m. )132
'42 PACKARD CLUB COUPE-Clipper 8,
good condition, must sell. No reason-
able offer rejected. Ph. 2-2432. r)131
JEEP-4-wheel drive with special body,
1948. 15.000 miles, original owner.
$675. Call 25-9383.; )130
WHY WALK when you can ride? lan's
bike. A-1 condition. Don Lauer, 3-1511.
ext. 2492. )97
REDUCED PRICES-i n's loafers $3.88;
U.S. Navy T-shirts 49c; wash slacks
$2.66; sport shirts, short-sleeves $1.69:
men's sport shorts $1.49; all wool
swim trunks $1.49. Open 'til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )113
PARRAKEETS make delightful, inex-
pensive pets. Easily trained to talk
and whistle. Also canaries, bird sup-
.plies and cages. Mrs. Rufins, 562So.
Seventh. )88a
1948 CHEV. FLEETMASTER 5-passenger
coupe, radio, heater. w-w tires, spot-
light. Sat. after 4, Sun. all day, 1521
Sudbury Ct., Willow Village. )129

Ii

Phone 4436

1216 South University

_._ _.

I

The C/iya6 etA i~idkn !£opA'p6

4

'/2

Yearly Clearance

Use a Classified

Liberty near

State

To SellI

...

I

SHOP IN AIR-COOLED COMFORT

J aco orot

SCHWINN light weight girls bicycle, 3
speed gears, hand brakes. One year
old, good condition. Also i portable
long play or regular speed phono-
graph, small three-way portable radio.
All new and in good shape. Box 387,
New Women's Residence. )114

LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2

I

For a fragrant mist
Just squeeze the
plastic bottle!

]

f

Jaco
Alexandra d
FRAGRA

bson's Exclusive
e Markoff
ANT FERN

STO A BEAUT

CI,
~t
A/A
(7 w
r't l t I ,

ES
IFUL FIGURE
o /

BEGINS TOMORROW!
Once a ain
giving you those traditional values
at / heir orgnal price!
ALL DRESSES in cotton . . . pure silk prints . . . rayon
prints, shantungs, and linens ... many pastel
and darker crepes. Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 44,
141/2 to 241/2. Originally $16.95 to $39.95.
ALL SUMMER SUITS. . . originally from $16.95 to $35.
35 SPRING SUITS ... mostly 100% wool gabardines
and crepes. Originally from $39.95 to $69.95.
ALL SPRING COATS originally from $39.95 to $65.00.
50 SKIRTS ... cottons, rayon tweeds, and wools.
Originally from $5.00 to $10.95.

A

I

11

6 CHECK WOOL SPORT JACKETS.

Originally $29.95.

l

BRA..

Groups of JACKETS
wool stripes - denims
and chambrays
orig. to $10.95

BETTER SLIPS
originally from
$5.00 to $8.95

NIGHT GOWNS
of Satin and Crepe
orig. $6.95 to $12.95

Qtr 1
. Or/
_4q

,.

SLIPS - Lace trimmed
and Tailored

BLOUSES
Cottons, silk prints, white

COSTUME JEWELRY
Rhinestone pins, Bracelets

/ UI"_

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