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June 23, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 1949TT
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'BA HU' 'T'AL X .. AALdE

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Yale

Wins

Collegiate

Dinghy

Trophy

Bengals Belt Bosox 13-4;
Yankees Split with Browns

I 1

BOSTON-P) -Detroit's Tigers
enjoyed Boston pitching yesterday
as they clubbed a quartet of Red
Sox pitchers for 18 hits and a 13-
4 victory.
The loss, before 9,292 home fans,
snapped a Sox winning streak
which had run through six games,
their longest of the season.
The Tigers played without their
star third baseman, George Kell,
who discovered this morning he
had broken a small bone in his
right foot yesterday when he fell
after trying to beat out a bunt.
Kell will be out three weeks.
NEW YORK-(P)-Tommy Hen-
rich's 14th home run of the sea-
son, with Gene Woodling aboard
in the sixth inning broke up an
8-8 deadlock and gave the New
York Yankees a 10-8 victory and
a. split in their doubleheader with
the St. Louis Browns yesterday.
The Browns won the opener, 5-1,
behind the clutch pitching of Red
Embree, who allowed 18 former
mates to reach base, but left 17
of them stranded, one short of
the major league record.
* * *
CINCINNATI -- (P) - Ewell
Blackwell won his first game of
the season yesterday, pitching two
and one third innings of scoreless
ball, as the Cincinnati Reds edged
out the Brooklyn Dodgers, 4-3, in
11 innings.
Don Newcombe went all the way
for the Dodgers, suffering his first
defeat. He has won four.
CHICAGO- (P) -Ten pitchers,
five on each side, paraded to the
Welcome Back
to MICHIGAN
and to
KUOHN'rS
Young Men's Shop
The Home of Quality
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122 E. Liberty On the Corner

mound yesterday when the Chi-
cago Cubs nosed out the Boston
Braves, 9 to 8, in a slugfest be-
fore 12,306.
There were 24 hits and 13 walks
in the contest with the Cubs hold-
ing the edge in power with three
homers to Boston's one. Homers
accounted for the first six Cub
tallies. One was by Dewey Adkins
for his first major league hit.
* * *
PITTSBURGH--(P)-The Pitts-
burgh Pirates walloped the Phila-
delphia Phils 12-3 yesterday as
In an effort to promote sand-
lot baseball in Detroit an exhi-
bition game between the De-
troit Tigers and the Cincinnati
Reds will be played at 5 p.m.,
June 27th in Briggs Stadium.
rookie Dino Restelli smacked his
fourth and fifth homerp of his
week-long major league career.
The Bucs piled up seven runs
in the fourth inning.
Pete Castiglione added his third
circuit clout of the year to the
two-round trippers by Restelli.
And Vic Lombardi tripled.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA -(P) - Dale
Mitchell's triple with the bases
loaded in the 14th inning tonight
gave the Celevland Indians a 7 to
3 victory over the Philadelphia
Athletics. Bob Lemon, who was
knocked from the box by the Ath-
letics last night, came back-in re-
lief of lefty Gene Bearden to gain
credit for his seventh win of the
campaign.

'M' Golfers
Head West
A six-man golf squad left
here yesterday for Ames, Iowa
where they will compete in the
National Collegiate golf tour-
nament next Tuesday and
Wednesday.
The Wolverine linksmen,
Western Conference cham-
pions, will rate as no worse
than co-favorites with five of
their six - man championship
team competing.
Ed Schalon, Pete Elliott, Rog
Kessler, Bob Olsen, Leo Hauser
and Keith LeClair will form the
Wolverine team. LeClair will
replace Chuck MacCallum for
the Maize and Blue.
Terrible Ted
Tops in .Poll
CHICAGO - (P)-Stan Musial,
the St. Louis Cardinal star who
was slow getting up baseball steam
this season, today captured the
lead amopg the National League
outfielders in the All-Star poll.
Musial, the National loop's most
valuable player last season, has
collected 461,201 votes in the na-
tion-wide balloting to select the
opening lineups for the 16th in-
terleague game at Brooklyn July
12.
* * *
THAT UNSEATED Pittsburgh's
Ralph Kiner as the National
League fly-hawk leader. Kiner,
with 449,843, trails Musial now by
11,358 votes.
With seven days remaining in
the poll, the total ballot is 1,323,-
731 with the prospect that the
1948 vote of 4,107,893 will be bet-
tered.
The "big six" of the vote-getting
battle include: Boston's Ted Wil-
liams, 522,834; Brooklyn's Jackie
Robinson, 472,603; Musial, 461,201;
Detroit's George Kell, whose in-
jury yesterday probably will keep
him out of the All-Star game,
453,472; Kiner, 449,842; and New
York's Tom Henrich, 446,192.

Eastern Schools Hold Supremacy;
Brown Takes Second;'M'Sailors Last
4-

By JACK SMITH
(Special to The Daily)
Easilysoutdistancing all opposi-
tion the Eli's of Yale sailed to
victory and possession of the
Morse Memorial Trophy in the
National Intercollegiate Dinghy
Championships completed yester-
day at Whitmore Lake.
The East was able to maintain
its supremacy in collegiate sailing
ranks with little difficulty. Brown
held the runner up position and
Harvard was in third place.
* * *
THE FINAL point totals were:
Yale 121, Brown 106, Harvard 103,C
University of California 86, Kings
Point 85, Ohio Wesleyan 80,
Northwestern 69, and Michigan 62.
,The Wolverines who were
rated top contenders for na-
tional honors at the start of
the regatta were never able to
get started. The best Michigan
could do in two days of sailing
was two second places.
Two fouls by Wolverine skippers
yesterday afternoon killed all
hopes of Michigan climbing out
of the cellar. In the third race
the Michigan boat.withdrew after
commiting a foul going around
the marker. In the fourth race
the Wolverines were protested for
a foul at the starting line and
disqualified.
EASILY THE outstanding skip-
per competing was Bob Coulson
of Yale. Sailing in the 'B' division
Coulson won seven out of the

eight races he sailed and placed
second in the eighth., His running
mate Bob Monetti also turned in
an outstanding performance.
The Golden Bears of Califor-
nia turned out to be the dark
horse of the regatta by taking
fourth place away from more
highly favored Kings Point and
Michigan. The main reason for
the Bears fine showing was the
smart sailing of their two skip-
pers Bill Ficker and Rolly Shutt.
The Eli's accumulated the great-
est number of first places by win-

ning seven out ofwsixteen races.
Brown was next with five firsts,
Harvard and Kings Point had two
each.
* * *
THE SKIPPERS for Harvard
were Frank Scully and Peter Put-
nam. Brown's entries were cap-
tained by Charles Ill and Glenn
Foster. The Kings Point skippers
were John Smith and Jim Fegley.
Competing for Northwestern were
Bob Seager and Jim Corley; and
fQr Ohio Wesleyan Ned Lockwood
and Gene Barilla.

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Extensive Intramural Program
Planned for Summer Students

fI

A huge summer intramural
sports program will get underway
Monday, June 27 under the dir-
ection of Howard Leibee.
Individual and team competi-
tion in ten sports will feature the
program which has been extended
this year to include baseball for
the first time.
* * *
INDIVIDUAL tournaments will
be 'held in badminton, handball,
paddileball, horseshoes, tennis
(singles and doubles) and golf
(both match and medal play)
while team leagues will be formed
for basketball, softball, volleyball
and baseball.
In addition facilities will be

Major League Standings.

* * *

10,

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

ST. LOUIS--()-The New.York
Giants blew a one-time 8-1 lead
as timely hitting by the Cardinals
and streaks of wildness by New
York pitchers gave the St, Louis
club a 11 to 8 decision before 15,-
275 fans. The victory put the Red-
birds just a half-game behind the
league leading Brooklyn Dodgers.

New York . .
Detroit ....
Philadelphia
Cleveland ..
Boston ....
Washington
Chicago
St. Louis .. .

W.
38
34
34
30
31
29
25
18

L.
22
26
27-
27
28
30
37
42

Pct.
.633
.567
.557
.526
.525
.492
.403
.300

G.B.
4.
4%/
6'/2
61/2
81/
14
20

Brooklyn
St. Louis.
Philadelphia
Boston ....
New York . .
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh.
Chicago.

W.
36
35
35
34
30
25
24
,..22

L.
24
24
28
28
29
34
26
38

Pet.
.600
.593
.556
.548
.508
.424
.400
367

G.B.
'2
3
5 %1
10%/
12
14

available at the IM building for
gymnastics, boxing, fencing,
wrestling, golf driving, trampo-
line, bag punching and weight
lifting.
Friday evenings will once again
be reserved for the popular co-
recreation nights, allowing women
an opportunity to make use of the
IM program's vast facilities.
SWIMMING, table tennis, vol-
leyball, basketball, badminton,
squash and several other sports
will be available to members of
the fairer sex who will have a
chance to show up husbands and
would-be athletic boy friends
(no pun intended).
Building hours for the co-re-
creation program will be from 7
to 9:30 p.m.
All men interested in partici-
pating in the intramural program
are urged to contact the IM office
either by phone or in person. The
phone number is 8109.
NEWT LOKEN, varsity gym-
nastics coach, will be in charge
of tennis and co-recreation, Don
Robinson will handle baseball and
softball, varsity golf coach Bert
Katzenmeyer will supervise golf
and basketball activities and Rod
Grambeau will take charge of in-
dividual tournaments.
The IM building will be open
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday during the sum-
mer months with activities end-
ing at 5:30 p.m. and from 9 to 12
on Saturday mornings. Saturday
activities will end at 11:30 a.m.
WILLOW RUN
CARRIER
WANTED
for
The Michigan Daily
GOOD PAY
Apply at the
Circulation Dept.,
Student Publications Bldg.
Ann Arbor

If you want slacks tha are
more than just a pair of
pants, be sure the label
says SEVEN SE AS. With
over 50 years of experience,
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
p.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Satur-
day.
Sports Tournaments - Women
Students: Tournaments in golf,'
tennis, and archery are being
sponsored by the Women's De-
partment of Physical Education.'
Register at the Women's Athletic
Building.j
Sports for Women: Classes for
beginning and advanced students
in golf, tennis, dance, swimming,
riding, archery. Register remainder
of this week in Barbour. Gymna-
sium-912, 1-4. Classes begin
Monday, June 27. Health service
check required.
Recreational Swinuning-Wom-
en Students: Tuesday and Thurs-
day evenings, 8-15-9:30, Michigan
Union Pool. Bring bathing cap.
Small fee. Health Service check
required.

Special Short Courses-Women
Students: Courses in tennis and
golf, designed to meet the need of
students with no previous sports
experience, will be offered on Fri-
days at 2:30 and 3:30. Register re-
mainder of this week in Barbour
Gymnasium-9-12, 1-4. Classes
begin Friday, July 1. Health Serv-
ice check required.
Student Organizations planning
to be active during the summer
session are requested to submit to
the Office of Student Affairs, Rm.
1020 Admin., not later than July
8, the following information: (1)
a list of officers and members, (2)
the acceptance of a member of the
faculty willing to act as adviser
to the group. ORGANIZATIONS
NOT SO REGISTERED BY JULY
8 ARE ASSUMED TO BE INAC-
TIVE FOR THE SUMMER TERM.
Forms for reporting the required
information- may be secured in
Room 1020 Admin.

The Following Regulations gov-
ern closed social events sponsored
by student organizations during
the summer term:
(a) Approval is required for all
social events sponsored by stu-
dent organizations, graduate
or undergraduate, where both
men and women are present.
(b) Applications for approval are
to be submitted to the Dean
of Students in the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Admin.
Bldg. not later than 12 o'clock
noon of the Monday before the
event is to take place. The list
of approved events will appear
in the Daily Official Bulletin
on Wednesday.
(c) The request for approval must
be accompanied by written ac-
ceptances from two sets of
chaperons, preferably two
married couples such as fac-
ulty members, parents of stu-
dents, alumni, or married stu-
dents of sufficiently mature
years. The president of the
sponsoring organization must
indicate his personal endorse-
ment of the chaperons select-
ed by signing the application
before it is presented to the
Dean of Students for approval.

(d) Dances may be held only on
Friday and Saturday nights
during the Summer Session
and must close not later than
12 o'clock midnight.
(e) Women guests in men's resi-
dences are restricted to the
main floor.
(f) No intoxicating beverages
shall be served or consumed at
any function sponsored by an
approved student organiza-
tion.
Office of Student Affairs.
Lectures
Special Lecture on How to Use
the University Library: Mr. Fred
L. Dimock, Chief Circulation Li-
brarian of the General Library of
the University, will give a special
lecture on Thursday, June 23rd at
4:15 in the Auditorium of the Uni-
versity High School on the topic:
"How to Use the University Li-
brary." This lecture is given for
all new students of the University
and for other students or members
of the staff who may wish-to at-
tend.
Lecture: "Tenacious Traditions
in American Education." Claude
Eggertsen, Assistant Professor of
Education, 3:00 p.m., Auditorium
University High School June 23.
Lecture: "The Rise of Standard
Languages." Professor Robert A.
Hall, Cornell University. 7:30 p.m.,
June 23, Rackham Amphitheatre.
(Continued on Page 4)

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