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July 24, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN AIL "

t UNBDAY.

NITA RIAN COUNSELOR:
Pastor Stresses Experiment in Religion
4 nRlgo

A man who approaches religion
xperimentally" is the Rev. Ed-
ard H. Redmtan, minister of the
nitarian Church and advisor to
ze Unitarian Student Group.
A search for fresh religious view-
oints is badly needed today, for
ie outlook inherited from the
ast does not apply to modern
mes, Mr. Redman believes.
* * *
CHARACTERISTIC of the pas-
r's "experimental" approach' is
s application of new discoveries

in social psychology in his prac-
tice of religion.
Because he feels that a uni-
versity atmosphere is the most
conducive for research in the
problems of religion, Mr. Red-
man prefers to work with stu-
dents.
He directs his efforts toward
helping them develop a sound re-
ligious viewpoint that they can
apply to situations not necessarily
associated with the church.

BORN IN MAINE, Mr. Redman
attended the University of Maine
and Meadville Theological School.
He is now working here for his
doctorate in philosophy.
The minister's first church
was a Finnish-speaking congre-
gation in Virginia, Minn.
He took over his present pas-
torate in 1943. During the war
he worked with the Unitarian Ser-
vice Committee in a recreational
project at Willow Run.
* * *
AS STUDENT counselor, he ad-
vises the Unitarian Student Group
and assists its members in plan-
ning a program that will yield
better understanding of religion,
political currents, and social re-
lationsh.s
Claiming the interest of the
group are such topics as fair em-
ployment practice legislation, more
adequate course offerings in the
University, and less rigid control
of women's hours.
Local Church
Groups To,
Feature Talks
Guest speakers are scheduled by
most of the student religious
groups for their Sunday evening
programs.
At Westminster Guild, Prof.
Preston W. Slosson of the history
department will speak on "Some
Implications of Atomic Energy."
* * *
SPEAKING to the Congrega-
tional-Disciples Guild will be
Mimi Gaylon, a student at the Un-
ion Theological Seminary, New
York. Miss Galon will talk on
"The Healing Ministry of Relig-
ious Counseling."
Prof. Ralph W. Hammett of
the architecture school will ad-
dress the Lutheran Student As-
sociation on, "The Relation of
the Church to Architecture."
The Rev. J. Edgar Edwards of
the Willow Run Community
Church will speak at the Wesleyan
Guild on "Sources of Inner
Strength."
* * * *
THE SUNDAY evening program
of Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, will feature a talk en-
titled, "Religion, A Therapy for
Mental Patients," by the Rev. Karl
Tubesing, Veterans Administration
chaplain.
Canterbury Club will travel to
Big Silver Lake for Its Sunday
evening picnic.
Continuing' with their regular
Sunday night activities will be the
Students Evangelical Chapel which
will hold a social after its serv-
ices, and Hillel, which will have
an open house from 7 to 10:30
p.m.

WUOM To'
A ir Mozart,,
A rBeethoven'
Slosson To Talk
On Woild Events
At 10 a.m. today, WIOM (91.71
mc.) will offer Mozart's Quartet
No. 2 in E-flat major and the
Quartet No. 7 in F by Beethoven
on its Chamber Music Hour.
Prof. Preston W. Slosson's week-
ly commentary on international
events will be presented at 4 p.m.'
Monday.
* * *
ALSO ON MONDAY, the 2:30
Medical Series will feature a talk
by E. L. Cataline, Associate Pro-
fessor of Pharmacy, on the com-
pounding and cost of prescriptions.
Willard MacGregor, pianist, will
"Perform Schubert's Sonata in A
major as well as works by Chopin,
Schoenberg, Stravinsky and De-
bussy on the Summer Concert
Series at 8 p.m. Tuesday.
TODAY
A.M.
9:15-Hymns of Freedom
9:45-The Organ Loft
10:00-Chamber Music
MONDAY

COLLEGE ROUNDUP
It's a Woman's World
On Nation s Campuses
By PHYLLIS COHEN
Anyway you look at it-it's a woman's world and the college
campuses are, proving it.
Indiana luniversity males have just discovered what Michigan
coeds have known all along-that it's the gals who have the horse
sense. A scientific test conducted in two high schools in Indiana
showed that the gals are more
likely to answer questions logically
than the "worser half" does.

HAIR'STYLES7
for VWomen!!
They are shaped and feather-
edged ta individual needs. Five
barbers .are on our stuff who
have had years of experience in
the art of cutting Ladies and
Children's hair. Your approval
is invited.
The DASCOLA BARBERS

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. f. Requisitions Accepted
314 South State St.

Liberty near

State

I'

--Daily-Ray Okonski
REVEREND EDWARD H. REDMAN
. experimental approach to religion
Calendar of Events

P.M.
2:30-Medical Series
2:45-Lane Hall
2:55-Daily Bulletin
3:00-Campus Varieties
3:30-Understanding Music
4:00-Preston Slosson
4:15-At the Console
4:30-Requestfully Yours
5:00-Books by Radio
5:15-French on the Air
5:30-Children's Story
5:45-Around the Town
6:00-Dinner Music
7:00-Classical Concert
8:00-Interlochen Band Con

THE INDIANA Daily Student,
obviously male-run, envisions a
dull future for the men with the
females taking over as lawyers,
physicists, and congressmen.
Out Oregon way, feminine rule
is causing the men double trou-
ble, but they brought it on them-
selves. Through some mix-up in
voting procedure, in electing the
queen for the annual Junior
Weekend, a tie was announced.
So a dual monarchy reigned on
prom night.
Down Georgia way, the "ladies"
have consistently been shown the
true Southern courteousness -
whether the "ladies" be coeds or
of the canine variety.
THE "LADY" in this case was
Lady, a mongrel who was granted
the unique privilege of using a
tree on campus for a maternity
ward for the birth of her six pups.
The tree became the center of
campus attention and signs such
as "Quiet - Maternity Ward - No
Cats Allowed" flourished.
But, alas, the city pound did-'
n't appreciate the situation. The
last report was that "lady ain't
no lady,' but as a stray dog,
must be destroyed along with
her new offspring.
In the realm of osculation, the
gals again hold the upper hand.
* * *
THE DAILY ILLINI reports that
the Illinois health department has
spoken up in favor of kissing.
"It isn't a dangerous germ
spreader after all," they say,
but rather "a pleasant greeting
and an agreeable salutation."
Agreeing with, this thesis that
kissing may be fun, Western Mich-
igan College held an informal poll
on the vital question, "Why Do
Girls Close Their Eyes When They
Kiss?"
* * *
ANSWERS proved very provoc-
ative and conclusively showed that
here, as elsewhere, the men are
running far behind the women.
It was discovered that nine
out of ten girls close their eyes
at "that certain moment" but
the tenth "has to keep a sharp
lookout for the guy she's sup-
posed to be dating steady.
Reasons why the gals keep their
eyes shut range from: "What else
can I do when he's got a face like
that?" to "I dream it's the guy
back home. After all, I gotta keep
in practice for hih."

ncert

TUESDAY

eciu
S", eCCin I

'1

TODAY
Graduate Outing Club will as-
semble, 2:15 p.m., northwest en-
trance of Rackham Building.
MONDAY
Educational Panel. Representa-
tives of the CanadaUnited States
Workshop,. 3:00 p.m., Auditorium,
University High School.
Lecture. "The Bisitun Inscrip-
tion-A Key to Decipherment and
Understanding," Dr. George G.
Cameron, Professor of Near-East-
ern Cultures, 4:15 p.m., Kellogg
Auditorium.
Carillon Recital. Prof. Percival
Price, University Carillonneur, 7:15
to 8:00 p.m.
Summer Session Lecture Series.
Anthony W. Smith, Industrial Un-
ion Councils, CIO, "The Role of
Government in Resource Conser-
vation," 8:00 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheater.
Student Recital. Katherine Bush,
pianist, 8:00 p.m., Rackham As-
sembly Hall.
TUESDAY
Lecture. "What Can and Should

the Schools Teach about World
Peace?" Margaret Koopman, Cen-
tral Michigan College of Educa-
tion, 3:00 p.m., Auditorium, Uni-
versity High School.
Lecture. "Greeks and Phoeni-
cians" (illustrated), Rhys Carpen-
ter, Professor of Classical Archae-
ology, Bryn Mawr College, 4:15
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
India Colloquium. "Modern In-
dia, Repeating Cultural Move-
ments," Prof. Benoy Sarkar, speak-
er. Prof. Everett S. Brown, Dept.
of Political Science, chairman,
4:15 p.m., West Conference Room,
Rackham Building.
Student Recital. Sidney Milder,
pianist, 4:15 p.m., Rackham As-
sembly Hall
Lecture. "On Planning a Survey
of the Dialects of Scotland," Prof.
Angus McIntosh, University of Ed-
inburgh, Scotland, 7:30 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater
Faculty Recital. Willard Mac-
Gregor, pianist, 8:00 p.m., Rack-
,ham Lecture Hall

P.M.
2:30-Music of Broadway
2:55-Daily Bulletin
3:00--Campus Varieties
3:30-So Proudly We Hail
4:00-German Club
4:15-University Choirs
4:30-Requestfully Yours
5:00-Books by Radio
5:15--Holland Today
5:30-Children's Story
5:45-Rowlapd McLaughlin
6:00-Dinner Music
7:00-Classical Concert
8:00-Summer Concert Series

Printed Rayon Tricot
PANTIES
and matching petticoat
by LUXI[TE
1 ~ieach~
Regularly 1.95
As brief as you want them . . . the panties,
with that smooth, sleek fit that means easy-
wearing comfort. As comfortably right .
the petticoat of the very some rayon tricot
jersey in gay forget-me-not print. Run-proof,
a whizz to wash, no ironing necessary. Pink or
blue on white. Panties: sizes 4 to 7; petticoat:
sizes small, medium, large.
Intimate Apparel
Jic .co..on+

,t

MI

«I

,1

On WPAG Tonight
Tales from the Four Winds, a
childrens' story in dramatic form,
will be broadcast by the speech
department at 6:45 p.m. over sta-
tion WPAG (AM).
This week's drama is called
"Zenobia's Infidelity" and con-
cerns a young doctor who is called
to the aid of a circus elephant.
The drama is directed by Vin-
cent Jukes.

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

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July

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Values to $17.95

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Tweeds and
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\W.

A

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