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July 22, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

THE MICHIGAN DATEY

a. .a a.ss ai a w J,/ Ai.l i.t ./.

IAILY DEADLINE DILEMMA:
Scores Stall Sports Editor

BY LILIAS- WAGNER
Daily Special Writer
There's nothing like a night
aseball game in another time
one to wear you down, Merle
evin, The Daily's summer sports
ditor, is. finding out.
With a a. m. deadline five
ights a week, a shortstaffed
ports department is suffering
,ervous prostration every time
hose late baseball scores start
'ouring in after midnight.
IN FACT, THIS IS one of the
reater problems of keeping the
ummer sports page going. One
nian puts. a page together alone
hese -days, and frequently it's
,evin who does the honors.
Most of the summertime
sports stories come from con-£
tacts with the Intramural Sports
building, coaches and the As-
sociated Press machine. There's
very little local sports news.
It's in the wintertime that things
eally get "hot" for the sports
taff. "Every time a Michigan
thletic team plays a game, the.
hone rings wildly at the Student
'ublications building - and more
ften than not the cry, of the
hone answerer is "Sporrrts!'
* * *
If Michigan has won, the call-
rs usually answer "Oh, good!"
r cheerfully, "Thank you." If
he news is bad, the "Thank you"
s likely to be much more restrain-

* * * *

Promotions
(Continued fr~m Page 1)
Louis A. Patronsky (Wood Tech-
nology).
School of Music:
Clyde Vroman (Music Educa-
tion).
College of, Architecture and De-
sign:
Emil Weddige (Design).
School of Public Health:
Dr. Leonard E. Himler (Mental
Health).
TO THE RANK OF ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR
College of Literature, Science
and the Arts:
Herbert C. Barrows, Jr. (Eng-
lish), Richard K. Beardsley (An-
thropology), Harold R. Blackwell
(Psychology), Frank Z. Braun
(German), Douglas D. Crary
('Geography), Ronald Freedman
(Sociology), Robert F. Haugh
(English), Roger W. Heyns (Psy-
chology), Edwin S. Lennox
(Physics).
Dourossoff E. Morley (Speech),
Hugh Z. Norton (Speech), Robert
W. Parry (Chemistry), Keith A.
Pierce (Astronomy), Earl D. Schu-
bert (Speech), Arthur K. Stevens
(English), Guy E. Swanson (Soci-
ology), Leonard Tornheim (Math-
ematics).'
College of Engineering:
Julius T. Banchero (Chemical
and Metallurgical Engineering),
Paul F. Chenea (Engineering Me-
chanics), Howard R. Colby (Me-
chanical Engineering), Robert B.
Harris (Civil Engineering), Har-
old J. Holmes (Metal Processing),
William H. Mack (English), Ed-
ward A. Yates (Engineering Me-
chanics), Jesse L. York (Chemical
and Metallurgical Engineering).
Medical School:
Basu K. Bagchi (Psychiatry),
Dr. James M. Bryant (Internal
Medicine), Dr. John W. Henderson
(Ophthalmology), Dr. Raymond S.
Jackson (Internal Medicine),
Lloyd L. Kempe (Bacteriology),
Dr. Lauren A. Woods (Pharmacol-
ogy).
School of Dentistry:
Dr. Edward A. Cheney, Albert G.
Richards.
School of Business Administra-
tion :
Douglas A. Hayes. (Finance).
School of Music:
Wayne L. Dunlap (Orchestral
Music), Marian A. Owen (Piano).
College of Architecture and De-
sign:
Paul H. Coy (Architecture),
Herbert W. Johe (Architecture),
Gerome Kamrowski (Drawing and
Painting).
School of Public Health:
Patricia M. Walsh (Public
Health Nursing).-

LIVING IN LATER YEARS:
Conference Considers
Employment, Retirement

Employment' and retirement
problems of older workers were
discussed at the University's In-
stitute on Living in the Later
Years yesterday.
Yesterday's conference began
with a bright note as John M.
Convery, of the industrial rela-
tions division of the National As-
osciation of Manufacturers said
that industry is increasingly will-
ing to employ the older worker.
* * *
"MORE AND MORE employers
are hiring on the basis of ability
to fill the job without regard to
physical handicaps or age," he de-
clared.
Some of this optimism was
dispelled when Ewan Clague,
Commissioner of the U.S. Bu-
reau of Labor Statistics told the
Institute that "once an older
man or woman becomes unem-
ployed for any reason, he finds
it exceedingly difficult to se-
cure new employment."
Harry Becker, director of the
social security department of the
UAW-CIO, told the conference
that workers know that they can-
not meet the problems of income
maintenance individually.
WUOM Will
F eatutre Talk
On Astronomy
Assistant Professor Hazel M.
Losh will disuss the astronomy of
the ancients on the 2:15 p. m.
Classical Civilizations program
over WUOM, 91.7.
Mendelssohn's Midsummer
Night's Dream and The Comed-
ians by Kabalevsky will be offer-
ed on the Classical Concert at 7
p. m. along with works by Strauss
and Moi.ssorgsky.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
p. M.
2:30-Journal of t he Air
2 :45-Classical Civilizations
2:55--Daily Bulletin
3:00-Campus Varieties
3:30-French Music
4:00-Sigma Alpha Iota
4:15-Novatime
4:30-Requestfully Yours
5:00-Books by Radio
5:15-Here's to Veterans.
5:30-Children's Story.
5:45-Les Etter-Sports
6:00-Dinner Music
7:00-Classical Concert

Sometimes the fans want min-
ite details when they call in. And
luite a few pick up tiny errors.
"A player's number, which
identifies him for sports writers,
may be confused in a picture.
The more rabid sports readers
know every player's number and
complain at any slip-up in that
connection," Levin said.
During the winter, sports staf-
ers are a traveled bunch. They
follow the team for important
;ames and telephone in big stories.
Among other big contests dur-
ng the past few years, Daily
ports staffers covered the1948
Rose Bowl game and the hockey
)lay-offs in Colorado Springs.
Levin, an English major from
ODORS OPEN DAILY 1:15 P.M.
Matinee 25c Nights 35c
Today & Saturday!

-Daily-Ray Okonski
MERLE LEVIN-SPORTS EDITOR
-* * * *

Cleveland, ,expects to graduate
next June. He.will share the sports'
editorship this fall with Pres
Holmes.
Most of Lexin's memories of
sports oddities and problems stem
from his stint as a reporter.
He found an especially befud-
dling situation while he was
covering the light-weight foot-
ball team a year ago, down at
Ohio State University.
"They were playing on a prac-
tice field which didn't have any
grass left on it," he related. "It
started to rain in the ifrst quarter,
and by halftime you couldn't tell
one team from the other-they
were covered with mud from head
to foot."
When Jerry Burns, Michigan
quarterback, faded to pass, even
he couldn't tell his players, with
or without a program. All of them
were lurking behind involuntary
mudpacks.
* * *
"IN FACT," Levin said, "Burns
0 Official Michigan Rings c
. Michigan mugs and
souvenirs
" Medals, Cups and TrophiesU
" Fraternity Jewelryc
., 0 Watch Repair Service
Hours 12:30 to 5:30, Mon.-Fri.
L. G. Balfour Co.
1319 S. University Ph. 9533

sort of closed, his eyes and threw
the pass at a man in the clear.
However, the man started to
run in the wrong direction."
'Burns had passed to an OSU
player. Just to be certain, how-
ever, both teams tried' to tackle
him."
Later on in the dressing room,
Burns told Levin, "the guy just
looked good to me, so I threw it!"
Such incidents are inclined to give
ulcers to even seasoned profes-
sional sports writers.
Maybe The Daily's writers
aren't old enough for heart attacks
or ulcers yet - but when six or
seven games are played in one
night, and a page waits until re-
porters run in and write the
stories - Merle Levin and his co-
horts may look forward to retire-
ment at an early age!

"THAT IS WHY insurance and
retirement programs are being de-
veloped by the unions," he said.
"Under present-day conditions of
living, very few workers are able
to provide for their own retire-
ment."
"Unions favor the expansion of
public social insurance programs,"
Becker declared.
List Names
Engine, BusAd
'A' Students
Perfect academic records were
achieved by 41 engineering coll-
ege students and four students of
the business administration school
during the spring semester.
Because of a misunderstanding,
the names of these students who
had all A averages for the spring
term were not printed in a list
which appeared in last Sunday's
Daily.
* ,* *
THE NAMES of the top-rank-
ing engineering and business stu-
dents follow:
College of Engineering
Stephen S. Baits, John C. Biery
Charles V. Bliven, Robert R.
Bockemuehl, William G. Brown,
James A. Burns, Leonard V. Cha-
bala, Robert S. Collar, Roger S.
Collard, John R. Davies, William
J. Gorman, Thomas D. Graham,
Frederic D. Grant.
Victor J. Harris, Robert A.
Jacobson, Warner C. Jennings,
George E. Karres, Oskar Loosme,
Philip McCallister, James E.
McGill, Herman J. Merte, Finn
C. Michelsen, Walter A. Morgan,
George J. Nebel, Donald D. Phil-
lips, Jr., James H. Rice, Robert
P. Rohde, Harvey E. Schatz.
Willis J. Service, Jr., Charles D.
Simmons, Richard I. Smalter,
Henry Smithies, Bruce W. Swan-
son, Frank H. Tendick, Jr., Rich-
ard E. Wagner, David E. Weyant,
Gerald M. White, George A. Wil-
cox, David S. Wise, Denis Chun-
Chuan Yang, Sumio Yukawa.
School of Business Administration
George M. Broderick, William
D. LaBaw, Geraldine L. Weiss,
Russell J. Zentz.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. I. Requisitions Accepted
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.
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f. IP

IN m--, 1
LOIS JAMES
MALL* CARDWELL

TRANSPORTATION
WOMAN RIDER WANTED - To Calif.
Aug. 1, Ref. exch. Box 197 Mich.
Daily. )94
FOR
SALE
SUMMER CLOSE-OUTS-Swim trunks,
all wool $1.49; walking shorts $1.49;
U.S. Navy white pants $1.59; men's tee
shirts 69c, ribbd and plain, assorted
colors. Open 'til 6:30. Sam's Store.
122 E. Washington. )102
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Underwood
Champion. Write C. R. Srock, 814
Congress St., Ypsilanti.. )101
WHY WALK, when you can ride? Man's
bike, A-1 condition. Don Lauer, 3-1511,
ext. 2492. )97
GIRLS BICYCLE, reasonably priced.
Call Dale 9494 after 3:30. )96
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Lovebirds, talk-
ing, whistling Cocketiels. Bird sup-
plies and cages. 562 S. Seventh, at
W. Madison. Phone 5330. )88

HELP WANTED
WANTED - Graduate bacteriologist to
work full-time in an experimental
laboratory. Call Dr. Richard Rowe,_
2-2521, ext. 320, days, or 2-2960 eve-
nings. )100

BUSINESS
SERVICES

4x7z

WANTED
FURNISHED APARTMENT-Reasona3ly
close to campus. Young married cou-
ple. Call: Royal Oak, 3241; collect.
)98

"Fair 'N Cooler"
FLUID SKIN CLEANSER
by Alexandra de Markoff
Created especially for warm weather, by Alexandra
de Markoff, Fair 'N Cooler combines particular
cooling, cleansing and refreshing ingredients. Just
spray it on from the unbreakable plastic bottle.
4 oz. 2.50
Plus fax
ocok.onc

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The
(/ya~eM i/ktt

BARGAI D

ECLS

ART CINEM
AND YOUNGI
PRES
,GAGB BNT
weer of
my Award
ast hIe est pictre
of It year1

A
P
si

WOR K-Fall time, any kind. Contac
Cal Leedy at 8257. )92
PERSONALS
ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS. The Stu-
dent Periodical Agency is authorized
to accept your subscription to The
ARCHITECTURAL FORUM' at the
Student Rate of only $5.50 yr. Phone
6007 to order. We'll bill you. )95
4A LEAGUE
PROGRESSIVES
ENT
ETt RN
Winner of the
* ezy Award
as the estP ure
Richard Llewellyn's
Un I %ES

LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIO5
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 ) 5B
WHEN YOU are in need of prompt,
expert typing call
2-3537 )91
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. ) 28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and.
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors. 4
OLSEN'S BINDERY.
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED - BELIEVE IT OR NOT -
THREE copies of the May Issue of
the Gargoyle. We will pay 50 cents
each for the first three that are
brought*to the Michigan Daily office.
)105
NAVAL Officer's Khaki Uniform. Worst-
ed or gabardine. Size 38. Ph. Ypsi
4672J2. )104
the man who thought of every.
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