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July 21, 1949 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S

FED SPECIALISTS:
Family Physician Can't
Know All-Dr. Forsythe

The family physician as an in-
titution is one health ideal that
ppears to be in trouble, accord-
nig to Dr. Warren E. Forsythe,
irector of the University Health
ervice.
Speaking yesterday in Kellogg
kuditorium, Dr. Forsythe declared
hat the day has passed when one
erson could carry in his head all
he knowledge necessary to give
cceptable modern medical care.
"THIS APPEARS;" he said, "to
esult from the fact that the sci-
nces necessary in medical care
Brown Says
Gan ada Our
Gast Frontier
America still has a frontier-
he great northern regions of
laska and Canada, according to
xerald S. Brown of the history de-
artment.
Brown spoke last night in the
.fth lecture of the current Amer-
:an-Canadian relations series. He
onsidered the ways. Americans
ave influenced Canada's'develop-
nent.
* * * .
"THERE IS A new frontier in
orth America today, and this,
ist great frontier no longer lies
'estward but northward," he ex-
lained.
"It is the north of Alaska
and the Northwest Territory of
Canada. The Alaska highway,
the northwest staging route, Op-
eration Muskox, all of these
speak of a new day, a new op-
portunity, a new frontier," he
declared.
"Americans have done more to
ttle Canada than any other na-
onal group," he declared.
iexican Tour
lanned by IC
International Center has ar-
inged for a twenty-two day va-
Ltion tour to Mexico City for for-
gn and American students.
This tour will last from August
: through Sept. 4, 1949, and will
st $230. -
This tour will include visits to
ae French Quarter of New Or-
ans, the Pyramids of the Sun and
me Moon in Mexico City and the
bating gardens of Xochimilco.
he tourists will also visit Cuer-.
av,aca, Taxco, and Puebla.
The price of this 6000-mile tour
tcludes transportation and hotel
rrangements. However, food and
cidental personal expenses are
xcepted.
For details, Homer E. Under-
ood, of the-International Center,
ay be contacted. ,

have become so extensive that. no
one can be considered competent
except in a limited field of spe-
cialization."
In discussing the health cen-
ter, Dr. Forsythe asserted that
the ,many trained people and
expensive facilities involved' in
good medical care must be cen-
tralized, planned and made
available to the largest number
of people with the least possible
waste.
He maintained that this service
must be made available upon some
basis of distributed costs.
* * *
DR. FORSYTHE pointed out
that the question of medical care
is most acute in less populated
areas and that an attempt must
be made to induce physicians to
practice in rural regions.
"The answer," 'he said, "ap-
pears to be the establishment of
health institutions outside larger
cities."
He explained that a typical rural
county with 30,000 to 50,000 pop-
ulation and a county seat of about
10,000 could attack its medical
care problem by the establishment
of. a modern health center with
sub-centers in surrounding towns.
"The extra cost in comparison
with present expenditures and in
view of value received would be
a wise investment and a health
idea of which the country could
be proud," Dr. Forsythe said.
Housing for
Aged Inferior,
Says Randall
Speakers at the University's
conference on problems of older
living yesterday painted a rather
dark picture of the housing sit-
uation for oldex people..
The conference, was told that
while public and private' housing
for older people is increasing in
amount, it still falls.far below the
need, and much of it is sub-starld-
ard in quality.
OLLIE A. .RANDALL, of the
Community Service Society of New
York, denounced the practice of
building homes for older people
on the outskirts of towns and
cities-far away from the center
of things.
"Geographical isolation of
most of these homes is a blight
upon the whole program of aid
to the aged," he declared.
"Under these conditions, the
adage 'out of isyht, out of mind'
applies to the older people.
Both Randall and Mrs. Lita .H.
Luebbers, of the Michigan De-
partment of Social Welfare, urged
that consideration be. given to
meeting the personal and emo-
tional needs of the aged as well
as the requirement for physical
shelter.

TO PERFORM TONIGHT-Paul Doktor, viola, and Benning Dexter, pianist, both members of the
music school faculty, will play French music in a special concert under the auspices of Le Cercle
Francais. The program will be held at 8 p.m. in the Hussey Room of the League, and the French
club invites all students to attend. Doktor is a member of the Stanley Quartet. Dexter is a guest
lecturer and pianist who joined the faculty this srmmer. The program will feature a 17th Century
suite of dances by Marais, Milhaud's first viola s(nata, based, on old themes, and Brahms' "Sonata
in F minor, Op. 120, No. 1."
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Students To
Put on New
RadioPlay
"The Man Who Was Born to
Be Hanged" will be presented on
the Angell Hall playhouse at 10
p. m. today over station WHRV.
The drama, written on a psy-
chological theme, is an original
script by Posh Roach. It reveals
the inner thoughts of a man who
is convinced that the only way he
can die is at the end of a rope.
This belief in a fated death has
no crucial consequencies for him
until he falls in love.
The production by the speech
department will feature students
in radio classes. Leading roles will
be portrayed by Bob Thompson
Jane Linsenmeyer, Jack Fritz, and
Borris Winer. It is being directed
by Josh Roach.
WUOM To
A ir Band
Rehearsal
WUOM 91.7 will eavesdrop on
an authentic band rehearsal, con-
ducted by William Revelli, at 2:30
p. m. today.
The 7 p. m. Classical Concert
will offer "Come Sweet Death" by
Bach, Hind emith's "Sonata No. 3
for Viola" and works by McDon-
ald, Barlow and Campos.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
p. M.
2:30-Band Rehearsal-
2:55-Daily Bulletin
3:00--Campus Varieties
3:30-Angell Hall Playhouse
4:00-Unesco World Review
4:15-About Books
4:30-Requestfully Yours
5:00-Books by Radio
5:15-Songs of France
5:30-Children's Story
5:45-Musical Profile
6:00-Dinner Music
7:00-Classical Concert
Two Student
Lobbyists Go
To Washington
The last-minute fight for the
52-20 provision is still going on.
Paul Malkus, representing AVC,
and Al Fishman, of the Young
Progressives, left for Washingt'on
last night to go on a one-day
lobbying junket.
* * *
THE TWO DELEGATES will try
to interest Congressmen and
others around the Capitol in ex-
tending the 52-20 provision of the
GI Bill of Rights, which would or-
dinarily expire on July 25.
Fishman said that the National
Committee to Save 52-20, a group
composed chiefly of veterans, will
hold an all-day lobby in the na-
tion's capital today.
AVC and the campus YP are not
affiliated with the Committee, but
both groups have passed resolu-
tions favoring the extension of
52.20.
will present its annual informal
summer dance on Saturday night,
23 July, from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m.
at the Horace Rackham Graduate
Bldg. Everyone is cordially in-
vited.
Classical Studies: The regular

weekly coffee-hour will be held on
Friday, July 22, at 4:00 p.m. in
the West Conference Room of the
Rackham Building. Professor Fink
will speak informally.

1313 South University

Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!
LIMITED TIME ONLY
SUMMER
SESSION

X

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(Continued from Page 2)

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who wish to hear the concerts to
best advantage.
Student Recital: Masako Ono
Toribara, student of voice with
Arthur Hackett, will present a pro-
gram. at 8:00 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Music.
Her program will include a group
of Japanese folk songs, ,composi-
tions by Poulenc, Ravel, Peterkin,
Quilter, Hutchinson and Bantok.
Two members of the School of
Music faculty, Paul Doktor, violist
and Benriin Dexter, guest pianist,
will present a special concert for
the Cercle Francais on Thursday,
July 21 at 8:00 p.m. in the Hussey
Rbom of the Michigan League.
Their. program will include com-
positions by Marais, Milhaud, and
Brahms.
Student Recital: Cohleen Jen-
sen, student of voice with Philip
Duey, will present a program at
8:00 p.m., Friday in the Hussey
Room of the Michigan League, in
partial fulfillment of the require-
nents for the degree of Bachelor
of Music. Her program will in-
clude compositions by Purcell,
Dowland, Handel, Mozart, Ravel,
Poulenc, Schubert, Delius, Rimsky-
Korsakov, and Bernstein. This re-
cital is open to the public.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, AlumnihMemor-
ial Hall: Drawings by Isamu No-
guchi (July 7-31). Islamic pottery
from the collection of the College
of Architecture and Design.

Rackham Galleries: Paintings
by Willard MacGregor, Visiting
Professor of Piano, School of Mu-
sic (July 8-August 5), East Gal-
lery.
Architecture Building: Exhibit
of student work in design and in
city planning. (June 9-August 13).
University Museums Building,
rotunda.. Arctic birds, by Geprge
Miksch Sutton. - '
Museum of Archaeology: An-
tiquities of the Mediterranean
area.
Clements Library: Unique Can-
adiana: A Selection of Fifteen Ca-
nadian Rarities in the Clements
Library. (June 20-August 19).
General Library, main lobby
cases. Contributions of the Anci-
ent Mediterranean World to West-
ern Culture. *
Miehigan Historical Collections,
156 Rackhamn Building. Siketches
and architectural plans of Iiving
K. Pond.
Events Today
Sociedad Hispanica: Conversa-
tion group meets today at the In-
ternational Center from 4-5:30.
Faculty and students are cordially
invited.
International Center weekly tea
for all foreign students and Amer-
ican friends-4:30 to 6:00 o'clock.
Young Democrats-Open meet-

ing. Prof. Preston Slosson will dis-
cuss the Administration's Compul-
sory Health Insurance Program
and will answer questions from the
floor. Students, faculty, and
townspeople are cordially invited.
Mich. Union, 7:30 today.
The White Steed with Whitford
Kane as Canon Matt Lavelle at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at
8 p.m. Once again Mr. Kane is
playing the role that he created
for the pre-Broadway tryout of
this Drama Critics Circle Award
play. Tickets are on sale at the
Mendelssohn Theatre box office
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The Cercle Francais cordially
invites students and faculty to its
next meeting, Thurs., July 21, at
8 p.m., in thO Hussey Room of the
Michigan League.
This will take the form of a
chamber music recital, presented
through the kind co-operation of
the Music School, and featuring
two of its faculty members, Paul
Doktor, viola,and Benning Dex-
ter, piano. The program will com-,
prise works by the French com-
posers Marn Marais (17th Cen-
tury) and Darius Milhaud, and
Brahms' Sonata in F minor
written for viola and piano.
Corning Events
The Graduate Outing Club will
meet at 2:15 p.m. Sun., July 24, at
the Northwest Entrance of the
Rackham Bldg. for swimming and
games.
The Omega Psi Phi fraternity

SOX -SOX-SOX
Sweat Sox, Cushion-Sole Sox, Purty Colored Sox
3 Pr. 1. 0
Fruit-of-the-Loom MEN'S HANKIES
12ceach, 10 for 1.00
Famous Brand
5.95
99c pr.
Navy Surplus Sailor Hats ........ . .49c
(We dyed 'em blue, red and yellow),
White Navy Shorts ..............59c
White Gym and Sport Shirts. . , . . . . .79c
Air-C orps Type $ 50
SUN GLASSES, I.
Worth Much More-For Women, Too!! pair
3.95 Pullover Terry-Cloth Sweaters.. .99c
1.49 Polo Shirts ...... , .... ..79c
yellow, tan and blue
Last nine Craig-Wood .............$10
All wool Sweaters ............ 3.95 each

4

'41

STOCK REDUCING SALE!
.9
We are continuing our
BARGAIN DAY SPECIAL of
20% off

I

11

on all Merchandise in stock
(except Fair Trade Merchandise)
Buy at Will and Deduct 20% from your Bill!
mEnZ TOGGERY

NAVY
SHIRTS
55c each
6 for 3.00

.lam",$" "';
t,.

j

!!

521 East Liberty.

Michigan Theatre Bldg.

-

Shop in Air-Cooled Comfort

11

COLU BIA RECORDS
SONATAS FOR VIOLIN AND HARPSICHORD (Mozart).$S.

ATTENTION, VETS

20

I

On the 25th of this month, 52/20 expires!

Kirkpatrick and Schneider
SYMPHONY No. 8 IN B MINOR-Unfinish
Philadelphia Orch. L B. Walter
QUINTET IN C MINOR, K 406 (Mozart)
Budapest Quartet with Katims

ied

(Schubert)

MM 811
. . . $4.15
MM 699

5.95 Elastic Rain-Jackets.... . . . ... .1.50
White Terry Cloth Bathrobes .......8.88
Strie Terry Cloth Bathrobes. . ... .9 9
a 19.95 value
SUNTAN 92
"Khaki"
PANTS pr.
Guaranteed Swiss Wrist Watches.. .5.55

I

9 s "9 .

I

The bill to extend it has been held up in committee for several months. As Gov.
Williams pointed out, if the law expires, one third of Michigan's Vets will be left
completely unprotected against the threat of growing unemployment. This will
have profound effects on the whole economy. In addition, the various states will
lose millions in Federal aid for unemployment, and consequently, all unemployed
persons will suffer.
ACT NOW TO SAVE 52/20

CONCERTO IN F FOR PIANO AND; ORCH. (Gershwin)
Levant, N. Y. Philharmonic
GISELLE BALLET SUITE (Adam) . . . . . .
Royal Opera House Orch. - Lambert
SLAVONIC RHAPSODY (Dvorak) . . . . . . .
London Philharmonic Beecham

. . $4.15
MM 830
. . . . $5.20
MM 512
. . . . $3.10
MX 277
. . . . $3.10
MX 55

79c CLOTH WATCH BANDS

Buy a dozen at 5c each

NEW COLUMBIA 78 R.P.M. PRICES
12" Masterworks . .1.05 12" Popular ......89c
10" Masterworks . .89c 10" Pooular ......63c

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Rustle your bustle to

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