100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 20, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILV

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 194j

f

IL MAN'S VIEW:
Wilson Optimistic Over
America's il Outlook

An optimistic view of America's
oil reserves for the future was pre-
sented Monday night by Robert E.
Wilson, chairman of the board of
Standard Oil of Indiana.
He spoke in the University Sum-
mer Session lecture series- on nat-
ural resources.
PESSIMISM over dwindling oil
supplies is unjustified, he explain-
ed, because of constant technologi-
cal progress in the methods of
finding and extracting oil, and in
the development of other forms of
energy.
Wilson pointed out that concern
over the depletion of petroleum
resourcn in the past has been un-
founded.
Since 1919, for example, we
have consumed several times the
6,500,000,000 barrels which a
geological survey in that year
estimated to be our total reserve.
Using new methods, experts have
discovered previously unknown de-
posits at levels as much as 25,000
feet below the surface. New meth-
ods of drilling have also been de-
veloped to extract oil from lower
levels.
MOREOVER, waste has been re-
duced. Where once 20 to 25 per
cent of the available oil was ex-
tracted, state regulation of pro-
duction has raised the percentage
to 70%.
Even if we should contemplate
the exhaustion of our petroleum
resources, modern technology is
perfecting methods of obtaining
fuel from other sources.
There are large deposits of
Prof. Coombs
Opens Survey
TalksToday
Six special lectures on problems
in, opinion sampling and survey
research will be given at the Uni-
versity, beginning at 4 p.m. today
in Rm. 131, .Bus. Ad. Building.
All six lectures will be sponsored
by the Survey Research Center as
a part of its summer session pro-
gram on survey research tech-
niques.
PROF. Cylde Coombs, chief of
the research division of the Bu-
reau of Psychological Services, will
lead off in the parade of lectures.
Ile will speak this afternoon on
'General Theory of Scaling."
Before joining the University's
faculty in 1947, Prof. Coombs
spent six years as a research
psychologist with the War De-
partment.
The second lecture will be de-
livered at 4 p.m. tomorrow by Her-
bert Hyman on the University of
Chicago's National Opinion Re-
search Center. His topic will be
"Methodological Research on In-
terviewing."
* * *
Among the succeeding speakers
for the series is Archibald Cross-
ley, the director of the famous
Crossley poll. He will speak on
August 2.

tar sands in Canada which have
not yet been exploited. Oil shale,
also, can be used for the pro-
duction of fuel oil.
..All .of .these .possibilities .are
All of these possibilities are
practicable, when and if the price
of petroleum becomes high enough
to warrant their application.
* * *
IN ADDITION to these immedi-
ate sources, energy can ultimately
be obtained in virtually unlimited
quantity from either atomic or
solar sources. Solar energy in par-
ticular, Wilson said, has tremen-
dous potentialities.
City lpCounvcil
Cuts Sunday
Bus Service
Ann Arbor will be without local
bus service on Sundays beginning
July 31.
The City Council voted Monday
to cut the service at the request
of the Greyhound Lines who are
operating the busses at a loss. The
company claimed that much of its
total losses are because they carry
only about 441 passengers on Sun-
day compared to the weekday
5,000.
IN VOTING for the proposal,
many of the Council members ex-
pressed fear that if Greyhound
could not cut its losses, it would
give up its franchise, leaving the
city without bus service.
Church group vigorously op-.
posed the proposal. They noted
that this move puts the city
back twenty months ago before
these groups won their battle to
reinstall Sunday busses.
During the war this service had
not been available.
Council President Cecil . Creal
noted that Ann Arbor's bus service
compares unfavorably with cities
smaller than this one.
Miller To Talk on
Water Resources
Leslie A. Miller, former governor
of Wyoming, will speak on the
subject of "Water in Our National
Economy" at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Miller, in addition to long serv-
ice in public life in Wyoming, was
chairman of the Hoover Commis-
sion's sub-committee on natural
resources.
U.S. Tops Quota
DULUTH, Minn. -(/)- Ameri-
cans put the opportunity savings
bond campaign over the top "by a
comfortable margin."
First official announcement
that the Opportunity Sale quota
will be exceeded was made here
today by Vernon L. Clark, Des
Moines, Ia., National Director,
U.S. Savings Bond Division, Treas-
ury Department, at a national
conference of state bond sale di-
rectors.

Music from
Interlochen
On WUOM
A concert by the 100 piece High
School Symphony Orchestra, re-
corded earlier at Interlochen, will
be featured by WUOM, 91.7 mg.
at 8 p.m. today.
In conjunction with the Insti-
tute for Living in the Later Years,
WUOM will replace its 4:00 Cam-
pus News with an on the spot
broadcast from Rackham Hall,
spotlighting the colorful interests
of aged hobbyists.
The Classical Concert at 7 p.m.
will offer Smetana's Quartet No.
1 in E minor, Serenade by Keller
and works by D'Indy and Phillips.
TODAY'S PROGRAMS
P.M.
2:30-Tell Me Professor.
2:45-School of Music.
2:55-Daily Bulletin.
3:00-Campus Varieties.
3:30-University Symphony.
4:00-Hobby Broadcast.
4:15-The Beaver's Tale.
4:30-Requestfully Yours.
5:00-Books by Radio.
5:15-Adventures in Research.
5:30-Children's Story.
5:45-Guest Star.
6:00-Dinner Music.
7:00-Classical Concert.
8:00--National Music Camp.
Open Institute
On 'Living in
Later Yea rs'
"Living in the Later Years" is
the name of a special institute
which opens at the University
today.
The institute will offer lectures,
discussions and demonstrations on
subjects related to the problems of
older people.
THIS IS the University's second
annual institute on aging. Such
institutes are part of a broader
program of research on the prob-
lems of aging in the population
which is being conducted by the
University's Institute for Human
Adjustment.
Registration for the institute
begins at 9:30 a.m. today in the
Rackham Building's foyer. All
program sessions except tomor-
row night's dinner meeting in
the Union will be held in the
Rackham Building.
The first lecture of the institute
will be given this morning by Na-
than W. Shook, chief of the Cardi-
ovascular Diseases and Gerontol-
ogy Section of the United States
Public Health Service.
* * *,
THIS AFTERNOON'S program,
starting at 2 p.m., will take up
housing and living arrangements
for older people, and tonight's
program, beginning at 7:15 p.m.,
will consider leisure time activities.
The institute will continue all
day tomorrow.

Riding Horses For Hire
EXCEPTIONALLY FINE
NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772

.....

-WMOlWmWWAWPmk

LITFHOGIIAPI'NG

QUICK SERVICE

ECONOMICAL

COLORS and DESIGN
MIMEOGRAPHING
You type stencils or we will.
EDWARDS LETTER SHOP

711 North University

Phone 2-2846

1111

COURSES IN

1ufiaemand014OP110nen tal (ehr ahA,
The Early-way method can solve your writing problems,
Service Dept. for All Kinds of Writing -
Greeting Cards, Name Cards, Bookplates

CLASSES
8 A.M. - 8 P.M. (Monday thru Friday)
8 A.M. - 12 Noon (Saturday)

-Daily-Norm Steere
NIGHT BASEBALL-Three Michigan coeds, New Women Dorm variety, take advantage of the
lighting surrounding their Ann Arbor home-eng Iging in a night baseball game in the courtyard.
The lassie with the bat is Frances Castner, Grad.; the catcher is Marilyn Lee, '51; and the umpire
is Mary Wilcox, Grad. Other picture and editorial appears on page four of today's Daily.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Petmnh 4 i tudko

4021 Observatory

Phone 2-8606

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
TEMPLE CAFETERIA

(Continued from Page 6)
with regard to methods of teach-
ing on both the high school and
college levels. All teachers and stu-
dents will be welcome. Refresh-
ments will be served.
Institute on Living in the Later
Years. Registration, 9:30 a.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre. Sessions,
10:30 a.m., 2:00 and 7:15 p.m.
Phi Delta Kappa: The last in-
formal supper and discussion will)
be held at 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. today
in University Club Dining Rm.1
(Located adjacent to the West Un-
ion Cafeteria.) Dr. J. B. Edmonson,
professor of secondary education
and dean of the School of Edu-
cation will share with the group
some of his rich experiences in the
field of education.
Note: Initiation will be held in
the faculty dining room at 5:30.
Members the School of Educa-
tion faculty and Phi Delta Kap-
pans are invited. Obtain your
dinner in the cafeteria line and
proceed to the club dining room.

Coming Events
Central Michigan Alumni Din-
ner, Thursday, July 21, 6:30 p.m.
Women's League Tea Room. Meet
in Lobby.
International Center weekly tea
for all foreign students and Amer-
ican friends-4:30 to 6:00 o'clock.
University of Michigan Sailing
Club meeting tomorrow at the
Union, 7:00 p.m. Especially con-
cerned with arrangements for the
Wisconsin regatta.
The Cercle Francais cordially
invites students and faculty to its
next meeting tomorrow at 8 p.m.
in the Hussey Room of the Mich-
igan League.
This will take the form of a

chamber music recital, presented
through the kind cooperation of
the Music School, and featuring
two of its faculty members, Paul
Doktor, viola, and Benning Dex-
ter, piano. The program will com-
prise works by the French com-
posers Marin Marais (17th cen-
tury) and Darius Milhaud, and
Brahms' Sonata in F minor
written for viola and piano.
U.S. Air Force Reservists: Or-
ganizational meeting of 9607th
Volunteer Air Reserve Training
Squadron, Flight B, will be held
at Michigan Union, Room 3-R,
July 26, 1949, 8:00 p.m. Informa-
tion will be available regarding the
Air Force Reserve Training Pro-
gram and Reserve requirements.
Interested Air Reservists are urged
to attend.

MASONIC TEMPLE

* 327 S. Fourth Ave.

Now Under
..NEW MANAGEMENT
Servng
SUNDAY DINNERS
11:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M. (Reg. Weekday Prices)
WEEKDAYS (MON. thru FRI.)
11 to 2, 5 to 7:30 P.M. Closed Sat. All Day
A PLEASANT PLACE TO DINE

I1

..

"I like a Mild cigarette.
That's why I smoke Chesterfields-
they're Milder, much Milder."
FEATURED IN?
"JOHNNY ALLEGRO"
A COLUMBIA PICTURE :.i

At Real Bargain Prices
For*Men
48 pairs of LOAFERS at $4.85
(Regular $8.95 values)
30 pairs of brown and white SADDLE OXFORDS
at $6.85
(Formerly sold at $10.00)
20 pairs of brown and white SPORT SHOES at $8.85
(All $14.95 values)
For Women
100 pairs of SANDALS - CASUALS and
SPORT SHOES at $3.88
(Every pair from our regular $6.95 to $8.50 stock)
48 pairs of high heeled PUMPS at $4.85
(Blacks only in suede or genuine lizard)
45 pairs white ARCH-PRESERVERS
48 pairs ARNOLD AUTHENTICS

BARGAIN DAY

286 Pairs of Odds and Ends
A. large group of these famous name shoes transferred from our other
stores. Not all sizes in each style, so shop early for best selection.
$3,
Orig. 10.95 to 16.95
Special Group of BETTER LINGERIE
GOWNS PAJAMAS
SLIPS BED JACKETS $3
PETTICOATS SLEEPCOATS Or9. 8.95
LUXITE PRINT PETTICOATS, Orig. 2.95 .$1.00

ANN ARBOR

Luxite's smoothly fitting rayon knit petticoats in assorted printed
Sizes small, medium, large.
Pure Silk Print Scarfs $1
Orig. $2 to 4.95
Pure silk prints and pleated scarfs with handrolled
edges. In long lengths, large and small squares.

patterns.

wit's - c
"t' cigarett because
btsa satisfying smoke.
THE E MANqFOR
S S R4aV
Bp7O Bor"'RAVE

2-tones and dark colors

One price $8.95

(Regularly sells at $14.95 and $16.95)

GOLF SHOES - Men's and ladies'
only $10.95
S I r -- . . _ - - ..r - . . _ - _ I - - . , 1 -- t i

SUMMER BLOUSES
Rayon, Textron and cottons in whites, plaids and soft pastels.
Short and long sleeves, some midriff styles; sizes 32 to 38.

- .

11er

ou

I.n__ eC ddo 1%

it I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan