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June 22, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E EIG" THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Johnson Announces Plans
To Modernize Carriers
WASHINGTON-()-Secretary sion of the atom bomb but in our
of Defense Louis Johnson called superior stockpile, our produc-
Russia an opponent of peace yes- tion capacity and in the effec-
,terday and at the same time an- tiveness and quantity of aircraft
pounced plans for modernizing two required to deliver those bombs."
U.S. aircraft carriers at a cost of
$80,000,000. He said Russia believes indepen-
This will give the United States dent nations cannot live peaceably;
eight carriers capable of launching that people who do not grant the
the heavier types of postwar air- superiority of the collective state
craft, including light bombers, de- are enemies of human progress;,
fense officials said. (The Navy al- and that cooperation cannot serve
ready has launched planes capable the interests of both the Commu-
of carrying atom bombs from its nist and non-Communist worlds.
large carriers.)* * *
* * * THEN HE ADDED:
JOHNSON MINCED no words in "While our free world lies within
saying that Russia's non-coopera- the shadow of a power addicted to
tive attitude is the reason this na- these incorrigible myths, a power
tion must keep a strong military hostile to its world environment,
organization in readiness. conspirational in its international
It was Johnson's first major conduct, despotic in its internal
policy speech since he took the affairs, we have no choice but to
top defense job in March. In his maintain for an indeterminate part
audience at the National War of our lifetimes military strength
College were President Truman as a deterrent to armed aggres-
and other high officials. sion.-
Johnson said Russia is "despotic" Johnson mentioned the criti-
and conspirational and opposed to cism that occurred when he can-
peaceful relationships in a free celled construction of a super-
world. carrier defense officials esti-
And he added this nation cannot mated would cost $200,000,000.
place too much faith in the atom He said some people had twisted
bomb, this cancellation into a charge
* * * that defense officials are perse-
"WITHIN A FEW short years we cuting the Navy.
may witness the end of this era * * *
of atomic secrecy-an era whose SAYING HE wanted to "put an
end will be signalled by the ex- end to this charge of conspiracy,"
plosion of some other nation's Johnson declared he is convinced
bomb," Johnson said. of the need for carrier aircraft. He
"From that day on, our ad- also said there is no truth in re-
vantage in strategic bombing ports he plans to do away with the
will rest not in monopoly posses- Marines and the Navy's air power.

Smith New
Admissions
Board Head
University Provos t James P.
Adams last week announced the
appointment of Registrar Ira M.
Smith as chairman of the Board
of Admissions.
Prof. Adams also announced the
creation of an Office of Director
of Admissions. Prof. Clyde Vro-
man of the music school will serve
as director of admissions, and will
be in charge of the new office.
* * *
THE DIRECTOR of admissions
will be responsible for the admis-
sion of all freshmen to the Uni-
versity, as well as the admission of
students to thealiterary college
with advanced standing.
In the past, the Registrar's
office has handled the admis-
sion of freshmen while a spe-
cial office in the literary college
took care of admissions with ad-
vance standing to that unit. The
new office will coordinate these
activities.
Prof. Vroman will give full time
to the administration of admis-
sions, and will be responsible to
the chairman of the Board of Ad-'
missions.
Representatives from each of
the schools and colleges to which
students are admitted by the di-
rector of admissions will make up
the Board of Admissions, accord-
ing to the provost.
Trumbo Wins
Photo Contest
First Prize
Prize-winning entries in the
West Quad Camera Club's photog-
raphy exhibit have been chosen.
Grand prize of $15 went to Jim
Trumbo for "Nightshift," which
also took first prize in the portrait
class.
OTHER FIRST PRIZES were
awarded for "Shadows and Re-
flections" by David Muller in the
landscape class; "Awe" by Trumbo
in the pictorial class and "The
Steps" by Santosli Bagchi in the
open class.
Second and third place prizes
in the four classes went to:
Portrait-"Hope" by Bagchi and
"Linda" by George Hess; land-
scape-"Can Spring Be Far Be-
hind" by Bagchi and "Moon-
light" by Ed Denslow; pictorial
-"Sleet" by George Hess and
"Technology" by Manny Rosen-
baum; open -"Affection" by
Bagehi and "One More" by
Denslow.
Judges for the exhibit were an
Ann Arbor portrait photographer
and two men from a local camera
concern.
Grass and Water
JERSEY CITY, N.J.-Mrs. Av-
erage Dairy Cow drinks eight gal-
lons of water each day to wash
down the two acres of grass she
I eats during the summer.

MEETING TODAY:
'U' Hostel Club Will Discuss
Plans for Summer Activities

PROPOSED $350,000 HILLEL STUDENT CENTER: The latest thing in architectural genius is incor-
porated in this artist's model of the proposed $350,)00 Hillel Foundation Student Center. Unusual
feature of the building is the wall fountain and po I on the left wing. Included in the building are
a student chapel seating 200, a student lounge, a music room and library, a recreation room, class-
rooms, and complete facilities for the religious, s icial, cultural and counseling program sponsored
by Hillel Foundation.
$50,000 Gift Launches Hillel Drive

Those students already weary
of the study grind and pining for a
chance to get lots of sun, activity
and fun may join the newly-form-
ed University Hostel Club at :15
p.m. tonight at Lane Hall.
The group will discuss plans for
biking, hiking, and canoeing trips
as well as square-dancing parties
in line with the traditional hostel
policy of participating in all ac-
tivities "where you can travel un-
der your own steam."
SPECIFIC PLANS for a penic
to Whitmore Lake this Saturday
will be the chief topic for discus-
sion, according to John Gehring,
summer president of the group.
A canoe trip for the early-birds
not adverse to getting up at 7
a.m. or so on Sunday morning
will also be considered at the
meeting.

was organized specifically to h
students afflicted with the wa
derlust find congenial compani
to share travelling adventures w
them.
The campus group plans to
main separate from the Ann Ar
Youth Hostel Council but will we
with them in many activities a
may co-sponsor trips with t
group.
Graduate Wien
$1,000 Prize

SADDLE OXFORDS

by BASS

E

for

MEN
and
WOMEN

Elk with either black or brown saddle-

A special fund drive has been
launched for the building of a pro-
posed $350,000 Hillel Foundation
Student Center in Ann Arbor.
Special impetus to the drive was
given by an initial contribution of
$50,000 by Ben Paul Brasley, prom-
inent Pittsburgh attorney and a
member of the University Law class
of 1906.
* * *
THE CAMPAIGN for funds will
continue through the summer.
Hillel hopes the $350,000 will be
raised'by fall, when contracts will
be let and construction begun. Site
of the Center has not yet been
decided.
Rabbi Herschel Lympn, direc-
tor of the Hillel Foundation, has
announced receipt of additional
gifts from alumni, community
leaders and parents of students
at the University.
A 200-student chapel will be the
main feature of the building, de-
signed by Theodore Rogvoy, De-
troit architect. Also included will
be a student lounge, a music room
and library, a recreation room,
classrooms and complete facilities
for the religious, social, cultural
and counseling programs.
* * *
NO SITE for the Center has been
chosen, but several are under con-
sideration.
The present Center, a convert-
ed residence on Hill Street, is
shared by Hillel and the local
congregation, Beth Israel. Ten-
Meeting, Today
For Linguists
Luncheon, Lectures
Slated for Summer
TheuLinguistic Institute will
open summer activities with the
first in weekly luncheon confer-
ences today at the Michigan Un-
ion.
The members of the Institute
will attend the luncheon at 12:10
p.m. in the Anderson Room, and
at 1 p.m. in Rm. 3D, Prof. Hans
Kurath, director of the Institute,
will present a paper on its , his-
tory.
In addition to the Luncheon
Conferences on Wednesday, there
will be forum lectures at 7:30 p.m.,
every Tuesday and Thursday, in
the Rackham Amphitheatre pre-
sented by staff members and
guests of the Institute. The public
is invited to attend all lectures.
Prof. Robert A. Hall, Jr., of
Cornell University will speak on
"The Rise of Standard Languages"
at the first lecture on June 23.
I
CLASSES FORMNG
Regular and Special
Business Courses
Secretarial, Accounting,

A bill of five plays and one opera,
will be presented by the Univer-
sity's Department of Speech this
summer, including one special of-
fering which will be held in an
outside setting, on the steps of the
Clements Library.
"The Trojan Women" by Eurip-
ides will be offered July 28 and 29
outdoors; admission will be free.
The translation of the classic
tragedy is by Gilbert Murray.
* * *
THE SEASON will open with
Paul Osborn's "On Borrowed
Time" and will be given June 29
through July 2. A University in-
structor from 1924 to 1926, Os-
born presents the theatre-goer
with a fantasy of a boy and his
grandfather who chase Death up
an apple tree.
"Life With Father," the Lind-
say and Crouse comedy whose
Broadway run has set an all-
time record, will be presented
July,6-9.It is only recently that
the nostalgic comedy has been
released to non - professional
companies, after having enjoyed
remarkable success on the stage
as well as on the screen.
Tennessee Williams' "The Glass
Menagerie" will follow the Lindsay
and Crouse production, playing to
Ann Arbor audiences July 13-16. A

fortnight after its Broadway open-
ing, Mr. Williams' "memory play"
was voted the New York Drama
Critics' Circle Award for the 1944-
45 season.
* * *
WHITFORD KANE, distin-
guished Broadway and Hollywood
character actor will be guest di-
rector for the department's fourth
production, Paul Vincent Carroll's
"The White Steed." Kane, famil-
iar to Ann Arbor audiences for the
past 11 years, will also play a lead-
ing role in the performances which
will be given July 20-23. ,
The final presentation of the
season will be Puccini's opera
"La Boheme," which will be
produced in cooperation with
the School of Music. Wayne
Dunlap will conduct an orches-
tra composed of summer session
music students for the opera
which will be given August 3-6
and 8.
With the exception of "The
Trojan Women," all performances
will be staged in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, and direction of
the plays will be divided by Prof s.
Claribel Baird, Hugh Z. Norton
and Valentine Windt.
Tickets for individual perform-
ances and season tickets are now
on sale.

swiF r

* r"'

DRUG

rTORE

I

340 South State Street

SPEECH DEPARTMENT:
Opera, Five Plays Planned
For Summer Performance

Prescriptions - Drug Sundries
Toilet Articles
Magazines - Stationery
Fountain Pens and Pencils

tative plans had called for the
sharing of the new building, but
no decision has been made.
Architecture of the building is
modern, with an unusual wall
fountain and pool on the left wing.
* * *
CHAIRMAN OF THE campaign
for funds is Irwin I. Cohn.
Other participating members of

the board of the Michigan B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation, Inc.: Osi-
as Zwerdling, president; Louis H.
Schostak, secretary; Herman S.
Osnos, treasurer; Louis Berry, Aar-
on Droock, Sidney J. Karbel, Abe
Kasle, Henry Wineman, Harry
Yudkoff, Abe Draisin, Louis Glick,
John Merdler, William Present
and Herbert O. Schlager.

Motion pictures of trips held
during the past winter will also'
be shown.
THE UNIVERSITY Hostel Club
Another Soviet First
NOGUTNIA, Lower Slobbovia-
The largest bell in the world is the
"Tsar Kolokol" located in Moscow.
An eleven-ton chunk fell off be-
fore it was ever rung.

The George D. Booth Traveling
Fellowship of the College of Arch-
itecture and Design has beer
awarded to Charles W. Moore, '47
Moore has been practising ar
chitecture with a firm in Sar
Francisco since graduation.
The fellowship, in the amoun
of $1,000, is given each. year to f
graduate senior or to an alumnu
not over 30 years of age and en
ables the winner to travel in thi
country or abroad.
Honorable mention went t
Robert C. Gaede, '47, now an in
structor in architecture at Ken
University, Cleveland, Ohio.

L IG HT L U NC HES se rved a t our
Modern Soda Fountain
THE REXALL STORE ON CAMPUS

leather lining - and long wearing red rubber soles.
$10 and $11.95
VAN BoVEN HOES
17 Nickels Arcade

II

N

0

I

IT

HISI

Bargains

an

New and

Used

3 SQUARE MEALS A DAY

T EXT BOK S
for all courses

ONLY

1.50

AT

c

U

211

.I

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**7
STUDENT

*

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SUPPLIES

BREAKFAST, LUNCH
& DINNER .$9.00 I
6 DAYS A WEEK
LUNCH & DINNER
6 days a week... .$8.10

BREAKFAST, LUNCH
& DINNER,... $7.50
5 DAYS A WEEK
LUNCH & DINNER
5 days a week. . .$6.95

I

Machine Shorthand.

I

Special Department for Veterans

Finishing Course for
Commercial Students.
Pre-College Typewriting
and Shorthand.

I

FREE ICED TEA AND COFFEE to Club 211 members every afternoon

Ir11 Ll

f

Typing for Younger Boys
and Girls
Get a head start on a career
course, or take an intensive
skiIl-developing course during
vacation weeks.

1:30 to 4:30

- Serving Monday through Saturday.

AVOID ANN ARBOR'S HIGH FOOD

PRICES

. ..Club 211

gives

you better food at lower prices because YOU control the price,
- I'. - . - . t . ,_ -C... . --,. % ," t n. - - 1 +r , + lk n n a +k

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