100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 23, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THF MT IW'1'P.-AN TlA TT v

I 'l991t'!', &t-1 A w

- Ya w1 1.'L. l U. .l l W A it . l VL'1 11 .5..F U. A.U.J Z3

WEDNESDI

% l

W71

IN O SUFFLEBOARD?
Students Earn Credit in
Classrooms on Shipboard

The
City Beat
City police began picking up
unlicensed bicycles this week and
collected 50 in their first four
hours.

The well-known theory that
travel is an important part of edu
cation will be tested this summer
by fortunate students enrolled in
Education P200, otherwise known
as "European Study Tour of Phys-
ical Education and Related
Fields."
Central feature of the course is
a visit to Europe, including at-
tendance at the Olympic Games.
"Classroom" work will be carried
on aboard ship, at lectures abroad
and by visits to several foreign
centers of culture.
Old Earmarks
Student reports, projects and
' outside reading will give the course
the earmarks of the more conven-
tional campus classes.
Education F200 is "designed for
graduate students." Special atten-
tion will be devoted to physical ed-
ucation, health, recreation and
similar areas of study.
Fee $1,140
The trip will last from July 15
to Sept. 20 and the enrollment fee
for the course is $1,140, which is

well under the average for regular
two-month European tours. The
course carries from two to six
hours of credit, depending upon
the amount of assigned work the
student wishes to undertake.
Present itinerary calls for visits
to France, England, Scotland,
Wales, The Netherlands, Belgium,
France (again), Switzerland, Italy
and Gibraltar.
Games Headquarters
Group headquarters will be in
London during the Olympic
Games, July 29-Aug. 14.
The tour will be conducted by
Prof. Elmer Mitchell, of the edu-
cation department, who directed
a similar University excursion to
attend the Olympic Games in Ber-
lin in 1936.
Twelve students, two of them
undergraduates, are enrolled in
Education F200.
The name "Chile" is believed to
come from the Indian word mean-
ing "snow," reports the World
Book Encyclopedia.
- Feature Starts
1:00-3:36-6:16-8:56 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
COOL
- NOW PLAYING
THRILLS THE SCREEN HAS
NEVER KNOWN BEFORE
... As The Great Ameri-
can Adventure Is Filmed
For The First Time!

Licenses, costing 25 cents are
sale at the City Clerk's office,
the City Hall.
* * *

on
in

N'
..C
!y
aeWihTeseoleeRtes.
'IdTIME
,-F
Id
F s'
'd pkturs.the biget thin i
yur life-the news! Oder you n
personal copies of these two great
favorites ... at these special rotesJ
SAVE -. order taday throvgli
322 South State at N. Univ.
Phone 6363

The Freedom Train will arrive
in Ann Arbor August 19, Mayor
William E. Brown, Jr., an-
nounced recently.
* * *
A city committee was named to
confer with representatives of the
County Supervisors concerning
the erection of a joint city-county
building.
The group later called the pro-
posed building a "necessary public
improvement."
* * *
"To keep shirt sleeves from
tangling in the washing ma-
chine, button the cuffs to the
front of the shirt-the cuffs also
seem to get cleaner this way."
For that "Household Hint,"
Mrs. Earl W. Van Dusen, 15218
University Ave., won a large
electric orange juicer, six pairs
of nylons and a host of other
prizes on a coast-to-coast radio
broadcast from Chicago.
* * *
Ann Arbor was the first city in
the state to surpass its Crusade for4
Children contributions goal.
Donations totalled $20,450-$450
more than the quota.
* * *
Douglas E. H. Williams, Dorothy
E. Paton and Prof. Donald L. Katz
were elected to the Ann Arbor
Board of Education, at a recent
city election. They will serve three
year terms.
Washtenaw County's present
dog quarantine may be extend-
ed if citizens fail to observe the
restrictions, Sheriff John L. Os-
born warned.
At present, the quarantine is
scheduled to end July 13.
Two dog and one squirrel bite
cases were reported recently. All
victims were given Pasteur
treatments.
Wolf whistle gadgets, attached
to the exhaust pipe or manifold of
an automobile, are illegal in Ann
Arbor, a 16-year-old youth found
when he surrendered his operator's
license for a period of one week,
recently.
* * *
The editor of a Ford employe
newspaper, James G. Lyons, 43,
327 John St., died instantly when
the car he was driving smashed
into a utility pole on Washtenaw
Rd., recently.

HE'S A TAFT MAN--Boosting his selection for the Republican
presidential nomination, Dr. C. W. Bressler-Pettis, of Kissimmee,
Fla., sports a Taft button on his beard on his arrival in Phila-
delphia for the Republican Convention. Greeting him are Flor-
ence Walter (left) and Elinore Brawner, both of Philadelphia.
Don't miss The Daily's coverage of the Convention. It starts on
page one of this issue.
OPERA TION CLASSROOM:
Teachers' Invasion Scheduled,
To Discuss Responsibilities

Speech Group
Plans Summer
Lecture Series
Also on Agenda
Annual Conference
An active program of summer
events has been planned by the
speech department, which already
has talks by five visiting lecturers
and the annual departmental con-
ference on its agenda.
The lecturers will be presented
in weekly speech assemblies. First
visitor will be Prof. Paul D. Bag-
well, chairman of the department
of written and spoken English at
Michigan State College, on June
30.
On July 7 a talk will be given
by Prof. Wilbur E. Moore, chair-
man of the speech department at
Central Michigan College of Edu-
cation. He will be followed by
Prof. Edgar Willis of the speech
department at San Jose State Col-
lege in California, who will talk on
July 14.
The final two lecturers will be
Prof. William- M. Sattler of the
University of Oklahoma's speech
department, on July 28, and Prof.
Oren Parker from the Yale Uni-
versity School of Fine Arts on Au-
gust 4.
July 23 and 24 are the dates for
the annual speech conference and
reunion of ex-students of the de-
partment.
. C. To Emphasize
Teas Held Weekly
The summer program of the In-
ternational Center will empha-
size the weekly teas held at 4:30
p.m. every Thursday, according to
Dr. Esson M. Gale, Director of the
Center.
At the conclusion of the sum-
mer session, a selected number of
foreign students under the direc-
tion of Homer Underwood, Pro-
gram Director, will make a bus
trip to the Pacific Coast.

A unique array of leaders are
assembled in Ann Arbor this week
for the University's fourth annual
Workshop in Religious Education.
The workshop, wiiich is offering
a week's training in the teaching
of religion to children in the va-
rious grade levels, is under the
chairmanship of Prof. Leonard
Stidley, a member of the theologi-
cal faculty of the Oberlin Grad-
uate School.
Programs
Features of the religious in-t
struction. program are the five
demonstration programs being
taught at Bethlehem Evangelical-
Reformed Church from 9 to 11
a.m. every day through Friday of
this week.
The., demonstrations are fol-
lowed by one-hour discussion pe-
riods-in ,ihich members attending
the ' ctAference participate. The
emph4Ais is on the method rather
than = _the interpretation of the
teacliflg .principles used.
Varioii. Viewpoints
A :iaers of open forums on
churei and state education are be-
ing held every afternoon from 2 to
4 p.m. in Lane Hall, with religious
leaders representing various view-
points.
Representing the Jewish outlook
is Rabbi Morris Adler of Detroit,
while Prof. Francis J. Donahue of
the University of Detroit is pre-
senting the parochial school the-
ory of religious education.
Prof. Stidley and Dr. Edward W.
Blakeman, University consultant

ANNUAL WORKSHOP:
Churchmen Study To Teach
Religion in All School Grades

in religious education, are dis-
cussing the recent Supreme Court
decision against the Champaign
plan of "released time" religious
education in its effect on Michi-
gan,. New York, California and
Illinois.
Final Events
Classes for adults in the teach-
ing of religion to children at va-
rious grade levels are the final
events on each day's program.
Sponsors of the workshop proj-
ect are the University Extension
Service and the Ann Arbor Coun-
cil of Churches. Dr. Blakeman is
in charge of the arrangements.
'U' Alumni Council
To Meet July 12-15
The annual national conference
of the American Alumni Council
will take place on the campus
from July 12-15.
A series of seminars in which
the membership of each group will
be limited to 15, has been planned
for the delegates. They will discuss
such topics as alumni records,
clubs, magazines, reunions, and
fund-raising projects.
CLASSES
NOW FORMING
SPECIAL COURSES
CAREER COURSES
Be smart-get an early start
Check and mail this ad for
further information on the
course which interests you.

An invasion of the campus by
teachers is scheduled this summer
when delegates representing 200,-
000 teachers from across the na-
tion wVill assemble here for the
23rd annual League College Work-
shop in Professional Education.
Under the sponsorship of the
National League of Teachers' As-
sociation, some 60 delegates will
meet July 12-23 to discuss the ex-
panding responsibilities of the
classroom teacher.
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
School of Education is slated to
direct the workshop's activities. He
will be assisted by Michael Chiap-
petta, a member of the University
High School staff.
League College, organized in
1912, was the first teacher work-
shop. It was organized to develop
professionalism among teachers
and to foster leadership in pro-
fessional organizations.
The organization is managed as
a combination workshop-seminar
in which problems are compared,

experiences pooled and discussions
of the general educational situa-
tion are carried on.
Lectures presented in correla-
tion with the seminar will be given
by members of the University's
summer staff. Among the topics
plannned are "UNESCO and
World Peace," "Some 'Trends in
Government" and "Group Dynam-
ics-The Nature of Group Leader-
ship."

.ld

Conference To Study Small Business
Operation of a small business nancing, purchasing, and super-
will be studied in a one-day con- vising sales.
ference on campus tomorrow in Lewis G. Christman, executive
the Bus. Ad. School.
Emphasis in the program will secretary of the Ann Arbor Cham-
be upon the management of a ber of Commerce, will serve as
small business in which the owner moderator of the conference.
or manager usually performs all Any interested businessman is
the functions of management, fi- eligible to attend.
DALY_ OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ai
0i
l

Secretarial
Accountant
Machine Shorthand
Pre-college Typing
Finishing Course for
high school commercial
graduates

Paramount presents
GJY
PAULETTE
UNCONQUERED
6olr 4y 7-C H)ICOLO&
HollataBog/s'
Produced and Ou'ected by
Cecil B. DeMille
Also
WORLD NEWS

i f)

SClassified Advertising

+

j

HELP WANTED
WANTED: Coed for counter and foun-
tain work. Morning hours. Phone
5464.
BABY SITTER -Woman student or
student's wife Mon., Thur., Fri. 1-3
p.m. Phone 2-2035.

FOR SALE

Coming!

"ALIAS A
GENTLEMAN"

I

-You can't mss!

TEE OFF with a new set of golf clubs.
Ladies' and men's. Call 2-7053.
BABY BUGGY;dmaple dressing table
and stool; davenport and chair;
dishes; electric iron; wood clarinet;
tuxedo, topcoat, brown suit, size 36;
ladies' shoes 6%AAAA; Ph. 2-2035.
GAS STOVE 4-burner, A & B, $40.
Washing machine, Universal, with
many new parts, $65. Walnut-fin-
ished bed, springs and inner-spring
mattress, $15. Combination bottle-gas
and coal and wood table-top model
stove, practically new, $125. Every-
thing in good condition. Call 2-9020.
MAN'S BICYCLE, English made with
hand brakes, basket, kick-up stand,
chain guard and lock. Price $45.00.
Phone 27684 evenings.
BIKE, BALLOON tires. Good condition.
522 Packard. 2-8212.
MEN-Ride a Schwinn lightweight
bike. Excellent condition, reasonable.
714 Haven or 2-9580 after 5.
CHEVROLET. 1937 master coupe. Radio,
heater. Motor and steering gear re-
cently overhauled. Nearly new bat-
tery, $345. 1359 Rosewood.
ROLLEICORD camera, new model, ex-
cellent condition. Leather case. $125.
Call Don Nuechterlein 2-3803.
LEATHER FRATERNITY living room
furniture in fair and good condition.
Cabinets, chairs, tables, couches.
Open to dealers and private parties.
Best offer takes. 715 Hill street after-
noons and evenings. Phone 4187.

ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Two or three
meals a day, Monday through Friday.
715 Hill Street. Call 4187.
MISCELLANEOUS
STUDENTS desiring tutoring in
French, Japanese, Latin or Greek-
Please contact Reynold L. Burrows,
215 Prescott House, East Quad. 2-4591.
LOST AND FOUND
ROYAL No. 2 iron, University Golf
Cour e. June 16 .Rewaid Call2-6292
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for men students New furni-
ture. Innerspring mattresses 437
Hamilton Pl. Close to campus. Phone
5068.
CLOSE TO CAMPUS, can accommodate
graduate students or teachers for
summer and fall terms. Furnished
suites and part of double room avail-
able now. Plenty of hot water, show-
er, etc. Reasonable Call 509 ,'. Divi-
sion St. near Jefferson
APARTMENT available until Septem-
ber' 15. Completely fiurnished, from
automatic toaster to friendly neigh-
bors 924 Lynn Court, Willow Run
Village.
LARGE FRONT SUITE for one or two
men Good beds, hot water, coss ven-
tilation. Across street from School of
Education. Small group Mrs. Wood,
1008 Monroe
6-ROOM APARTMENT with private
entrance needs 1 male graduate stu-
dent for summer. 1 block from cam-
pus. Tel. 29130.
TWO-ROOM furnished apartment, call
Ypsi. 9380
WANTED-A girl to share an apart-
nient. Two rooms and bath on Pack-
ard ,just off State. Call 2-7548 be-
tween 12-1 or after 5.

Publications in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constrective notice to all)
members of the University. Notices for
the Bulletin should be sent in type-
written form to the Office of the Sum-
mer Session, Room 1213 Angell Hall, by
3:00 p.m. on the day preceding publi-
cation (.11.00 pm. Saturdays)
Notices
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 1948
VOL. LVIII, No. 169
All D.O.B. notices received at
the Summer Session office by 3
p.m. will be broadcast over
WUOM, the University station, on
the 3:55-4:00 news program the
same day.
Students, Colleges of Literature,
Science, and the Arts:
Courses may not be elected for
credit after Friday, June 25. The
willingness of an instructor to ad-
mit a student later will not affect
the operation of this rule.
Social events conducted by stu-
dent organizations during the
summer session shall be held in
conformity with the following
regulations:
(a) Approval is necessary for
all entertainments and social
events sponsored by student or-
ganizations, graduate and under-
graduate, where both men and
women are to be present. Applica-
tions for approval must be filed in

the Office of Student Affairs,
Room 2, University Hall, not later
than 12 o'clock noon on the Mon-
day before the event is scheduled,
and must include signed accept-
ances from the chaperons.
(b) Chaperons of social events
must be approved by the Dean of
Students. Two married couples of
sufficiently mature years are pre-
ferred as chaperons. Resident
chaperons or house directors may
serve if the group so desires. Ap-
plication forms and chaperon ac-
ceptance cards may be secured in
the Office of Student Affairs.
(c) Dances may be held only on
Friday and Saturday nights and
shall close not later than 12
o'clock midnight.
(d) A list of approved social
events will be published in the
Daily Official Bulletin on Wed-
nesday of each week.
Special attention is called to the
following regulations of the Com-
mittee on Student Conduct:
(a) The presence of women
guests in men's residences, except
for social events approved by the
Office of Student Affairs, is not
permitted.
(b) The use or presence of in-
toxicating liquors in student quar-
ters is not permitted.
(c) Student organizations are
expected to take all reasonable
measures to promote among their
members conduct consistent with
good morals and good taste, and to
(Continued on Page 1)

L~ Intensive Course for
college-trained students
Cool, pleasant classrooms
Day and Evening Classes
Free Placement Service
Approved for
Veteran Training
HAMILTON
BUSINESS SCHOOL
William at State Ph. 7831

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
1. PANO/
I7A! qQN~
N GE o j
Now
t~oAY~tIJ

with this
% FOLDING
CAMERA

"The most distinguished work of Pagnol as a
writer .. , High marks in the careers of Raimu
and Charpin." -N.Y. World-Telegram
"Heart-warming and diverting. As portraits of
people these Pagnol films are in a class by

C L IP THIS OUT

11

themselves."

m
a'

KODAK TOURIST
f4.5 Camera
You'll get the kind of pictures you want
with this camera whether you shoot indoors
or out, in full color or black-and-white. Has

--New Yorker

FOR QUICK, DEPENDABLE
SERVICE BY ANN ARBOR'S LARGEST
FLEET OF TWO-WAY RADIO-
DISPATCHED CABS,
A *d9 N

Th e 1t Cinena Xea'9ue
PRESENTS
A Summer Program of First-Run Foreign Films

"Down to earth comedy. A great French picture."
-N.Y. Journal-American

JUNE 25, 26 - MARIUS (French)
"Ranks with 'The Baker's Wife'"
JULY 9, 10 - TO LIVE IN PEACE (Italian)
N.Y. Film Critics Award Best Film of Year
JULY 23, 24 - FANNY (French)
pogo"Raimu and Pagnol at their best"

h PIERRE FRESNAY - CHARPIN
Directed by
ALEXANDER KORDA
ENGLISH TITLES .

I

i

} {

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan