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July 01, 1948 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-07-01

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t

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN I DAILY

TH RSDAY, JULY 1, 1948

nr. ^ --.-.,.,_. ..
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CONTROL OVER CHILDREN:
Threats to Withdraw Love Hurt---Hutt

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By STANLEY LEVINE
If I were offering a single slogan
for parents, I would say, "Never
charge a child with the threat of
withdrawal of love," Prof. Max L.
Hutt, chairman of the Psychology
Training Committee and Consul-
tant in psychology at the Neuro-
psychiatric Institute of University
Hospital, said.
This threat will cause insecur-
ity in the youngster and may re-
sult in "ambivalence" in the
child's attitude, a state in which
the ,child both loves and hates his
parents and is in constant tur-
moil and mental frustration, he
explained.
Control over children and their
free expression must be kept in
proper balance for growing young-
sters to realize fully their potenti-
alities, Prof. Hutt added.
Control and Freedom
A child either greatly over-con-
trolled or permitted uncurbed

freedom, is likely to be confronted
with overwhelming frustration, he
said.
"Parents should set a good ex-
ample for children, always accept
them and treat them warmly." In
this way, the child will be more
likely to grow without the serious
limitation or loss in spontaneity,
Prof. Hutt explained.
Furthermore, youngsters are
more likely to imitate the suitable
models of parents who show love
for them and do not force them
into specific patterns of behavior,
he added.
Parents should give very young
children freedom of choice, a
room, for example, and permit
them to learn at their own rate,
Prof. Hutt said. "As the child
manifests growth in self responsi-
bility, there should be a gradual
removal of limitations."
Bridled Youngsters
Clinical evidence indicates that

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youngsters, too bridled by parents,
often develop into docile, insecure,
inhibited individuals, he said. "In
response to overwhelming control,
a child may even show, in protest,
an anti-social or even a psycho-
pathic reaction.''
Refusing to offer children guides
for conduct of behavior in the be-
lief that their independence and
maturity will be fostered by com-
plete freedom, is another mistake
that some parents make in bring-
ing up youngsters, Prof. Hutt said.
Frequently this parental attitude
is merely a subtle way of actually
rejecting the child, he pointed out.
Children need guidance and
training but it must not be given
to them in a way that will inhibit
their spontaneity, Prof. Hutt
warned. "Controls should essen-
tially be self-imposed, except in
cases where it is imperative for
the physical welfare of the young-
st.ers."
Parential Devices
Parential devices, such as ver-
bal or oppressive admonitions,
subterfuge, or particularly threats
of withdrawing love as a means of
imposing their will, all have harm-
ful effects. on the child's person-
ality, Prof. Hutt said. A child may
become so fearful of losing paren-
tal love that he becomes complete-
ly submissive and loses all capac-
ity for spontaneous behavior, he
explained.
Occasional expressions of ag-
gression against parents are
I healthy, normal phenomena, .con-
nected with'maturation, according
to Prof. Hutt. Even when children
deviate from accepted standards,
complete acceptance and love
should be offered, he advised.
"Not that children must never
be frustrated; a child needs some
frustration, but in small amounts,
so that his spontaneity is not en-
tirely uninhibited."
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Hospital Calls
Blood Donors
The University Hospital wel-
comes blood donations, from both
professional and volunteer donors,
according to Dr. O. T. Mallery, Jr..
chief of the hospital's clinical
laboratories.
Those who wish to be profes-
sional donors should make an ap-
pointment to have their blood
typed and their name put on file,
Dr. Mallery said. The hospital
then calls them when needed.
Professional donors are paid $15
per pint of blood, and donors arej
not called more often than once
every two months, Dr. Mallery
said.

I'oungl IOintocrats . . .
The Young Democrats will hold
an organizational meeting at 8
p.m. today, in Rm. 302, Michigan
Union,
'i ib"rtion rtAnalysis .
Prof. Jesse Ormondroyd, of the
mechanical engineering depart-
ment. will discuss the develop-
ment of vibration analysis, at 3
p.m., today, in Rm. 445, West En-
gineering Building.

Campus Highlights

JV(lacfe Progressives . .
The first meeting of the sum-
mer term for the Wallace Progres-
sives will be held at 7:30 p.m. to-
day, in the Michigan Union.
Barnum and Bailey's Circus
created a sensation on its Europ-
ean tour in the 1880's. The Ger-
man Kaiser was so impressed with
the efficiency of the traveling
show that he ordered the German
army to adopt the circus method
of traveling and feeding.

IKE FOR PRESIDENT-Dale G. Mattern, of Altoona, Pa., self ap-
pointed manager of a campaign to get the Democrats to nominate
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower for President set up hadquarters in
the office of a blouse manufacturer in Philadelphia. Pictures of
"Ike" line the walls and there are plenty of buttons for distribu-
tion.
CUIRTA1NS FOR THEATRE:
T'o Folio w Raczing of Majestic
> _

4'

j

A. BROWN AND WHITE
(Wing tips, moccasin toes, and straight tips)

F

By CRAIG WILSON
Demolition on the site of the
old Majestic Theatre will be com-
plete within three weeks and con-
struction of a city parking lot will
* .
May Continue
The effect of the new Maynard
St. city parking lot on traffic and
parking congestion in the campus
area will be "not even a drop in a
large bucket," according to Alder-
man William J. Saunders.
The parking lot will hardly even
improve the present situation, he
said.
"However the city is at the bot-
tom of the barrel as farhasfi-
nancing more areas for parking
spaces, Alderman Saunders com-
mented. He is chairman of the
City Council Public Works Com-
mittee, which recommended the
project for action."
"As far as the campus is con-
cerned, the city is always five
years behind the parade," he
commented.
He listed several reasons for
overcrowded parking conditions:
The large number of driving per-
mits issued by the University to
students who must drive, the lack
of available space for parking lots
due to the University's vast expan-
sion program, and the tendency of
student drivers to park near the
campus and leave their vehicles in
one spot for the whole business
day.
An attendant will be hired for
the new lot and a parking charge
will be levied high enough to dis-
charge the city's financial obli-
gation on the project with the
bond-specified length of time, Al-
derman Saunders explained.
1* p

Coming
Sunday!

IRENE DUNNE
"I REMEMBER MAMA"

1;

r

begin immediately, according to
Clifford McIntyre, assistant city
engineer.
The entire lot, which is expect-
ed to eventually cover more than
32,200 square feet, and have a ca-
pacity of more than 600 cars, will
be completed before the summer is
over, McIntyre predicted.
Black-Topped
The surface area will be black-
topped, according to present
plans.
Besides razing the Majestic, the
parking project calls for the de-
molition of one home and the re-
moval of another. The city hopes
to eventually acquire 132 ft.
frontage on Maynardand 113 ft.
frontage on Thompson, the next
street to the west. The project will
be 264 ft. deep, from street to
street, McIntyre explained.
Actual work on tearing down
the theatre is progressing smooth-
ly despite the thousands of extra
nails put in the building's wooden
beams that make work difficult.
according to wreckers.
Took the Strain
The old building, which oncE
housed a roller rink, and played
host to 35 years of the nations best
vaudeville, stage and screen per-
sonalities, was built strong enougL
to stand the strain, they reported
However, the interior - fanc
work, organ and carpeting-failec
to survive the last six years of
desolation following the theatre'
closing in 1942, they said.
Shakespeare
Pens Up FTC
WASHINGTON, June 30-(')-
Shakespeare was right, folks.
The old boy may have written
his plays with a quill. But he
turned up today as an indirect
witness at a Federal Trade Com-
mission hearing on fountain pens
and mechanical pencils.
The Trade Commission is tryng
to write some rules for the pen
and pencil trade. One suggestion:
If a pen point looks like gold but
isn't, the manufacturer should
identify the metal he's using.
this.
"We all know pretty well by
now," he said, "that an object
may look like gold and not be
gold. Look at the trim on the chair
in this room. It looks like gold,
but we know it isn't."
Or, as Shakespeare put it in
"Merchant of Venice":
"All that glitters is not ghl'I."
Support
Finally George Metzger, the
Trade Commission's lawyer in
charge of the hearing, said he fig-
ured the meeting had better re-
cess until more information is
available.
"I'll make a note of all this," he
said.
While mechanical pen maker
Moody looked on in horror, Metz-
ger did, too.
With a two for a nickel lead
pencil.
I'rof. Fajans Giveni
Medal in Belgium
Prof. Kasimir Fajans of the

J acokA~fl&-

B. ALL BROWN VENTILATED OXFORD
(Moccasin toe)
C. G E NU INE W HIT E BUCK
(Plain toe with red rubber sole)
D. NA T UR AL FIN IS H B ROGU E OXFOR D
(Leather sole and heel)
All of these shoes ore from our regular stock and
are priced from $13.95 to $15.50
NOW ON E PR ICE . . . $8.85
NO APPROVALS - NO RETURNS - NO EXCHANGES
Remieiber: We close Saturday at 1:00 P.M.
VA7N BOV EN S H OES
17 Nickels Arcade

I

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mammamammans

S U E R

SHOE

MICHIGAN
35c until 5 P.M.
- Now Showing --

C LEARAN CE.
1357 pairs of better summer footwear accum-
ulated at our other stores and brought here
for this one great mark-down event!
SPECTATORS " CASUALS " ANKLE STRAPS
PLATFORMS " SLING STRAPS
OPEN OR CLOSED TOES
WHITES . BROWNS . BLUES. * BLACKS

N
I

1085
885
'685
485

ORIGI NALLY 14.95 to 16.95
Spectators-white with brown, blue or black trims.
High and medium heels. Also black, brown and
blue dress shoes.
OR IGI NA LLY 12.95 to 14.95
Spectators-brown and white and other combina-
tons. Also walking shoes by Stetson and a selection
of dress footwear in dark colors.

OR IGINALLY 10.95 to 12.95
All-whites, spectators and dark footwear.
and street type in most colors and sizes.

Dress,

ORIGINALLY 7.95 to 8.95
includes sport shoes, casuals, wedges in an array
of dark and summer colors. Flat and medium heels.

The entire Jacobson stock of fine summer footwear . .. shoes by America's

i : : :

J

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