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June 27, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-06-27

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P~AGE SIR

r THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y

SUNDAY, JUNE 27, 1948

Five Lectures
Set for Week
In highSchool
Charles Phillips To
Discuss UNESCO
Charles Phillips, of the Univer-
sity of Toronto, will speak on
"UNESCO and World Peace," at
the University High School Audi-
torium at 4:05 p.m. tomorrow.
The second lecture in next
week's series will be delivered by
Prof. Fred S. Dunham, of the edu-
cation school, at 4:05 p.m., Tues-
day in the auditorium. Dunham's
lecture, originally scheduled for
July 7, will be entitled, "Men and
Women of Tomorrow."n
"The School Library as a Mate-
rials Laboratory" will be discussed
by Prof. Richard Hurley, Library
Science, at 4:05 p.m. Wednesday.
Prof. Robert Travers, chief of
the examining division of the Bu-
reau of Psychological Services, will
speak on July 1, Thursday. His ad-
dress will be, "Recent Trends in
Evaluation Procedures."
The final lecture will be given by
Prof. Byron Hughes, who will lec-
ture on "Slow Growing Children."
The lecture series, which is open
to the public, will continue
through August 5.
A man convicted of wife beat-
ing can be whipped according to
Delaware law, according to the
World Book Encyclopedia.

NEITHER RAIN, NOR STORM-Farmer Edgar Rodeman (left) of Osage Bend, Mo., and his helper,
William Hazelhorst, meet the challenge of a flood with a little ingenuity of their own. Rodernan
saved some 23 acres of grain by picking up wheat shocks from a motor-equipped boat after the
Osage River had overflowed into his fields.

Prof. Preston W. Slosson will be
the keynote speaker at a meeting
of the Washtenaw Democratic
Club 8:00 p.m. tomorrow at the
Masonic Temple.
The Club will hear a report from
its Candidates Committee on pros-
pective candidates for the fall
election and consider a detailed
plan for registration canvassing.

LIFE STILL BEAUTIFUL:

Tiny Hungarian Speaking
Girl Runs Away, Loses Herself

DETROIT, June 26-(/P)--P-
lice had a problem on their hands
today-she's tiny, she has no
mother nor father and she's lost.
They think her name is Suzan
Kinces. But they don't know

h -..- - -- . ____-____________ il

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7Le

Qut arr, Jc.

PERFUME and COLOGNES
MID - SUMMER
ALLURE
BY MANY FAMOUS NAMES

^

The Quarry serves the campus as the CENTER OF FEMI-
NINE GLAMOUR. For Perfume, Colognes, and Cosmetics
the co-ed turns to the Quarry because they offer the wide
selection to suit a particular occasion or personality.

where she lives and neither does
she. She never bothered to learn
her street address.
She speaks only Hungarian.
Wearing two sweaters, a black
dress and a babushka, Suzan was
found i the front yard of a west
side horne where she spent the
night.
Ran Away
According to her story, she ran
away from home after a quarrel.
She walked as far as she could,
then knocked at a door and asked
shelter. The people took her in
for the night but she doesn't know
their names. They were away
when police found Suzan.
She's mad at a relative, whom
she accuses of "knocking her
down." But a Hungarian-speak-
ing police officer can't understand
her pronunciation of the woman's
name.
World Is O.K. '
Suzan isn't mad at the world,
though. It looks all right to her.
When she said she hadn't eaten
since Friday, someone got her
some milk and doughnuts. She ate
them.
"Life can be beautiful," she
commentedcin Hungarian as she
wiped her chin with the back of
her hand and patted her stomach.
Her age? She's 100 years old, she
told police. She's pretty close to it,
they agree.
WHRV To Air
Play Will Feature
DamonRunyon Style
An original drama by Robert
Powers will be presented on the
"Workshop Drama" summer se-
ries at 10:45 p.m. today over
WHRV.
The student - authored radio
play, entitled "Lucky," is a story in
'the Damon Runyon style about a
man who is bad luck to everyone
he encounters.
Produced by advanced students
in the radio division of the speech
department, it features Dick Et-
linger in the title role.
Other members of the cast are
John Cottrell, Josh Roach, Dick
Linden, Al Nadeau, Tom Weather-
wax, Eileen Stout, and Al Storey.
When John Ruskin criticized
one of Whistler's paintings, the
famous artist sued and won dam-
ages of one farthing (half a cent.)
According to the World Book En-
cyclopedia, Whistler had the coin
made into a watch charm.

Dewey Plans.
"Team' Action
With Congrecss
Would Use System
Followed in Past
ALBANY, N.Y., June 25-(P)-
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey, if elected
President, will try to push his pro-
gram through Congress by enlist-
ing Senate and House chiefs on
his "team."
Republican leaders of New
York's legislature, familiar with
Dewey's plans and techniques, said
tonight the GOP nominee would
follow his state pattern of execu-
tive-legislative relationships on a
national scale.
The System
Here's the way it works in New
York :
Senate and assembly leaders go
into a huddle with Dewey and his
advisors, considering all legisla-
tion. They study the problems, de-
bate the issues, and when agree-
ment has been reached get behind
the bills and shove them through.
Dewey and participants deny
that the conferences are cut and
dried, dominated by Dewey.
:oesn't Win Always
Assembly Speaker Oswaad D.
Deck said Dewey "has been voted
down several times."
Senator Benjamin F. Feinberg,
Senate Majority Leader, predicted
Dewey "would get along with Con-
gress because he always has gotten
along well with the Legislature."
"He's fair, isn't stubborn and
isn't antagonistic to others' views,"
Feinberg declared. "He wants the
facts first. After the facts are at
hand, we argue about what to do."
The Plan
Heck put it this way:
"The problems facing the na-
tion will be studied thoroughly
by the new President and the Con-
gressional leaders, a plan for their
solution will be worked out, then
Administrative and Legislative
branches will co-operate until
final action has been reached."
Dewey describing the Philadel-
phia Conference that chose Gov.
Earl Warren, of California, to run
with him on the GOP national
ticket, told newsmen at the con-
vention:
"At all times I solicited the
views of others but made no ex-
pression of my own."
Hear Them All
Dewey said he had found in Al-
bany that it was well to hear all
opinions.
Since Dewey took over the Gov-
ernorship in 1943, New York's leg-
islative program has been largely
the Dewey program. He has had
the advantage of overwhelming
Republican majorities in both
Houses,but has not been without
opposition.
Democrats have shouted "dicta-
tion" on numerous occasions and
Senate Minority Leader Elmer F.
Quinn's favorite title for the Gov-
ernor, during debate, is "his ex-
cellency." A few recalcitrant Re-
publicans, too, sometimes rise to
protest what they term domina-
tion by the "second floor," where
Dewey's capitol offices are locat-
ed.
Thumping Vote
But when the "team" goes into
action, the votes are there and the
program bills almost'-always pass
by thumping majorities.
Heck conceded that the pattern
would be complicated in Washing-
ton, where Republican-Democratic
strength in the Senate is expected
to be closely balanced next year.
Also on the national level, there
are more problems and more sec-
tional interests with vociferous

spokesmen.
Dewey has had financial "troub-
les" during his regime, but they
have resulted from too much
money instead of not enough. In
the words of administration
spokegmen, the troubles have re-
sulted largely from Democratic at-
tempts to "raid" the state surplus.
Under Dewey, the state piled up
$673,000,000, mainly because of
the high revenues of the war and
post-war years. Of this, $560,000,-
000 went into a postwar recon-
struction fund and $113,000,000
into "rainy day" funds for use in
lean years.

*

Secial Deparet
for V eterans -

i

New and Used
TEXTBOOKS
for all courses
STUDENT SUPPLIES

r

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PHILADELPHIA, June 26 - (P)
-The new GOP National Chair-
.man, Hugh D. Scott, Jr., is a So-
cialite Congressman and Ex-Navy
officer who has been a political1
warrior for a long time.

Scott describes himself as "a
very good friend" of Pennsylvania
Senator Edward Martin, who
started the Thomas E. Dewey
bandwagon rolling toward the
Presidential nomination.

New GOP Na tionial Clairmiiaii Is Political Warrior

When Dewey and other party
leaders decided on Scott for Chair-
man of the National Committee
today, reporters asked bluntly if
his selection was Martin's "price"
for going over Dewey.

3
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p

V

ELIZABETH ARDEN
HELENA RUBINSTEIN
LUGIEN LELONG
GUERLAIN
MARCELLE

44

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