100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 15, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Garg Is Best
Humor Mag,
Says Gargoyle
Statement Greeted by
Loud Bronx Cheer
By BEVERLY DIPPEL
Rumors have spread throughout
the entire Michigan campus that
the Gargoyle is the best humor
magazine in this territory.
These rumors are entirely true.
They have been perpetrated by
the editors of said magazine. No
one has had the audacity to refute
them, -perhaps because of the fact
that the Garg (a term of affection
or derision, as the case may be)
is tie only professedly facetious
publication on the premises.
Editors
The previously mentioned edi-
tors consist of one Douglass S.
Parker, a remarkably normal-
looking individual; Norm Gottlieb,
entirely the reverse; and sundry
other characters, many of them
semi-human, who spend the major
portion of their waking hours in-
dulging in sparkling repartee con-
cerning the finer things of life.
All of these intellectual doings
take place in the Student Publi-
cations Building. In finding the
office of the Gargoyle, the unin-
formed freshman may easily be
led astray by various signs point-
ing up an impressive stairway.
Beware! The place you seek is not
the Daily, although that publica-
tion is lodged above. The room,
the lovely smoke-filled lounge you
seek, is to the right of the door
marked "Men," you cannot miss it.
Six Issues
In spite of the air of reluctant
optimism rampant among the
member of its staff, th'e Gargoyle
manages to publish six issues dur-
ing the school year; sometimes
only five, still due to the reluc-
tance, if not the optimism, of the
staff.
Most copies of these issues are
purchased by students, who find
themselves heading toward lec-
tures in which the seating ar-
rangements are conducive to rest-
ful slumber.
Remember that name, the Gar-
goyle.

c

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

CHARLES

A. SINK, PRESIDENT

peeh t4

TWO

CONCERT

SERIES

1948-1949

CAMPUS PULSE-Pictured above is the Student Publications Building which houses The Michigan
Daily, the Gargoyle and the 'Ensian. The Daily is published six times a week and is manned
almost entirely by students. All the campus news is printed in The Michigan Daily which is also
a member of the Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press and carries the Alsops, Grafton
and Barnaby.

in HILL AUDITORIUM

- Ann Arbor

. , ,,,.. ,. _, , ,,. _..:..._.... . . n.. w. .. .. .

Seventieth Annual

Saily Puts Out
Lit Magazine
Last spring, The Daily launched
an entirely new literary supple-
rient in recognition of the need
for a permanent literary magazine
at the University.
Crowded writing courses and
the famous Hopwood contests
were indicative of the urgent need
for an outlet of expression by Uni-
versity students.
The new magazine published
works in all fields of writing-
fiction, poetry, drama and essay.
It also carried art work, criticism
of current books and records, and
articles on special subjects written
by students in all departments of
the University.
In addition to student work,
contributions from faculty mera-
iers on topics of current interest
were published.
The Daily will again publish the
supplement this fall. When the
.all for tryouts is issued, students
interested in working on the sup-
plement may apply.

UNIVERSITY PULSE:
Daily Supplies Coverage of
Campus, In ternatiai Eventts

Tailored to meet the needs of
readers who usually have to get
their news on the run, the Michi-
gan Daily presents to University
students in a brief, accurate and
highly readable form highlights
of campus activities plus complete
coverage of world events.
An eight column paper, 19
inches, the Michigan Daily is one
of the few full-sized college news-
papers in the country today served
by the Associated Press, giant
news-gathering agency.
Uip To Date
In addition, a corp of alert in-
terested student reporters and edi-
tors keep its readers up to date on
activities in Ann Arbor and on the
campus.
Many of these neophyte student
journalists have gone on to make
a name and career for themselves
in the professional field.
Edgar Ansel Mower, nationally
syndicated columnist, Clinton B.
Conger, chief of the Berlin bu-
reau of the United Press, and Wil-
liam H. Stoneman, whose byline
has tagged stories from the major
world capitals, are only a few of
the former Daily reporters who
have achieved national fame.
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey, Repub-
lican aspirant for the Presidency,
is another distinguished alumni of
the Daily.
Founded in 1890-it was only a
four column paper 12 inches deep
--the Daily has been in continu-
ous publication excepting Mon-
days and holidays for 59 years.
It was published independently
until 1900 when it came under
University sponsorship. However it
has sustained itself and its em-
ployes through sales and adver-
tising.
The splendid Student Publica-

W ,

STUDENTS
WITH CARS
Attention:

(% * 4
-'I-,-Y

Your BUICK DEALER will help you
with your AUTO SERVICE Problems.
Ann buickService o

tions Building which houses the
city room, editorial offices, busi-
ness office, press and the officeF
of several other student publica-
tions was erected in 1931 from
funds provided by the Daily.
Professional Comparison
It is regarded as one of the best
appointed buildings of its type it
the country comparing favorabl3
oftentimes with many professional
papers.
Excepting for composing room
workers, the Daily is published ex-
clusively by students. Any eligi-
ble second semester freshman or
upperclassman may work on the
Daily.
Among its many features are an
editorial page where any staff
member may express his views
over his signature, syndicated col-
umnists, the Barnaby cartoon and
a letter to the editor column where
readers may sound off on what-
ever is in their minds.
While the intent of the Daily is
not to be a crusader, its alert re-
porters have often aired irregu-
larities or injustices which have
aroused the campus body and re-
sulted in reforms.
A case in point was the ques-
tionable method of distributing
basketball tickets last season. Pub-
lication of the facts in the Daily,
resulted in immediate correction
Sof -the abuse.,
Local sports featuring the ac-
tivities of Michigan's consistently
top notch athletic teams are cov-
ered by Daily reporters. The As-
sociated Press furnishes reports
on sports news from elsewhere.
Perhaps the most valuable expe-
rience of all derived from work on
the Daily is gainedein the posts of
junior and senior editors.
These students, who have been
selected on the basis of ability and
service by the Board in Control of
Student Publications, are respon -
sible for page mnaksup and local
coverage.
Objective News
Their decisions determine
whether the Daily fulfills its func-
tion-complete objective news pre-
sentation of all the events worthy
of publication.
Constant constructive criticism
by senior editors of the work 6f
the remainder of the staff assures
the Daily readers that their col-
lege paper will be a professional
job, free of mistakes and misrep-
resentations:
Students interested in the busi-
ness end of the Daily have the op-
portunity to work on the adver-
tising, circulation and business
staffs of the paper.
And the Daily maintains a wom-
en's staff which caters to the news
requirements of the women stu-
dents.
Members of the staff of the
Daily often serve as Ann Arbor
correpondents for the Detroit
newspapers

FRENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

EZIO PINZA..
Thursday,
CLIFFORD CURZON.
Saturday,
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Bass
November 18
Pianist
Novem tber 27

Choral U nion Concert Series
10CONCERTS so
EILEEN FARRELL o Soprano
wednesday, October. 6

Monday, October 25

I,

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
GINETTE NEVEU .

Monday, December 6
. * . Violinist
Saturday, January 8

Sunday, November 7

VLADIMIR HOROWIT
NATHAN MILSTEIN

S . . . .
. . . . . . .®

101 North Ashley

Phone 2-3103

Pianist
Friday, February 11
Violinist
Friday, March 4

LI'

What's More Fun Thian A
H AYRIDE'
Not much, we'll guarantee you
that. Plan a party and use our
horse-drawn vehicles. Refresh-
ments are also available.
- ~ Phone: Ypsi 1038W2
SUSTEIKA LAKE

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FRI TZ BUSCH, Guest Conductor

Sunday, March 27

Season Tickets: $15.60 - $13.20 - $10.80 - $8.40
Third Annual
Extra Concert Seris
5 CONCERTS
MARIAN ANDERSON . . .* Contralto
Thursday, October 14
CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor Monday, November 15

4
4
4
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

______-__- - - -- - - --____- -_ I

S

TUDENTS

Visit Michigan s Most Modern
Iladio and Record Store

RUDOLF SERKIN

Pianist

. . 0 . 9 .0. .

Friday, December 3

JASCHA HEIFETZ .

Violinist

. . . .0. . .

Saturday, February 19
INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

RECORDS

* TELEVISION

FABIEN SEVITZKY, Conductor

Sunday, March 13

1

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan