100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 15, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T 15, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

HELPING HANDS:
Faculty To Counsel Incoming Students

I

HAVEN FOR 'BRAINS':

More Than Million Books in Library

Sixteen faculty members on
campus stand ready and willing
to share the many problems con-
fronting freshmen and sopho-
mores in their first two years in
college.
With headquarters at the Of-
fice of Academic Counselors in
Mason Hall, this welcoming group
is under the direction of Prof. Ar-
thur Van Duren. The counselors
are always anxious to discuss any
problems which arise in the! stu-
dent's academic life, including
student-faculty relations, study
habits, employment, health and
extra-curricular activities.
Direct Supervision
In order to facilitate their pri-
mary job of assisting students in
the selection of their programs
and fields of concentration, each.
counselor maintains direct super-
vision over a certain group of
freshmen and sophomores. Hey
keeps in close contact with their
academic work from the time of
their arrival at the University.
Special counseling services are
provided the large number of vet-

erans at the Veterans Services
Bureau in the Rackham Building.
The literary college will follow
its traditional policy regarding
freshman students again this year.
All must take work in physical
education for which no credit is
granted, and in addition must at-
tend a series of six hygiene lec-
eures and' demonstrations. A
course in English composition
mustebe elected during the first
semester to fulfill the English re-
quirement for graduation. Stu-
dents may select 12 other credit
hours of classes each semester in
addition to these basic require-
ments.
Academic Standards
Largely due to the greatly in-
creased number of admissions
during the last few years, aca-
demic standards have been tight-
ened. During their first semester
in attendance non-veteran stu-
dents must maintain at least a C
average. Veterans are permitted
an additional session in which to
maintain this minimum standard.

The following system of grad-
ing is used by the University:
A--excellent; 4 honor points per
hour of credit.
B-good; 3 honor points per
hour of credit.
C-fair; 2 honor points per
hour of credit.
D-deficient, passed; 1 honor
point.
E-not passed no honor points.
I-incomplete.
X-absent from examination.
A minimum of 120 hours credit
with at least a two-point (C) av-
erage is required for the bachelor
degree.
Attendance Requirement
Although academic standards
are somewhat higher, attendance
requirements are more lenient
than in past years. Students are
expected to attend classes regu-
larly. Absences will be considered
on an individual basis by the in-
structor concerned and action will
be taken where absence is endan-
gering satisfactory academic
progress.
Freshmen are not eligible to
participate in extra- curricular
campus activities. during their
first semester here, but may later,
providing they maintain a C av-
erage.
The majority of the courses in
the literary college meet in An-
gell Hall, facing State Street. The
Romance Languages building
houses most of the romance lan-
guage classes. Courses in zoology
and botany are held in the Nat-
ural Science Building, while those
in chemistry assemble in the
Chemistry Building. Classes in
other departments meet in Mason
Hall, Haven Hall and University
Hall.

The General Library, strategi-
cally situated in the center of
campus, puts over 1,200,000 books
at the services of University stu-
dents.
Less formally known as the
"Libe," the library is the haven for
those who wish to keep their
grades in the upper brackets. The
first floor study hall contains
books required for specified
courses. Professors list the books
on a supplementary reading list.
It is then posted on the study hall
bulletin board and the books in
the list can be obtainedat the
desk. The first floor study hall
also keeps a file of old examina-
tions.
Main Reading Room
The main reading room on the
second floor provides reference
books ranging from English-Ger-
man dictionaries to the Encyclo-
paedia Britannica. The numerous
reference books kept here makes
the second floor study hall an ab-
solute "must" for the students
writing term papers. It also pro-
vides a quieter atmosphere for
studying.
The key to all the books on

campus, the card catalog is also
located on the second floor of the
libe. The alphabetically arranged
catalog contains information
needed about the location of
books. The call numbers are writ-
ten out on slips provided for that
purpose and presented at the cir-
culation desk. The librarians will
bring up the book from the stacks
upon presentation of the call slip
and identification card.
Current books, for the extra cur-
ricular reader, can be obtained in
the same locality. The library
maintains an up-to-date book list
of current and popular reading for
the information of the student
who wants to keep up with the
best seller books. These books can
also be taken out from the libe
for a specified amount of time.
Term Paper Data
The periodical reading room, on
the same floor, provides invalu-
able information ranging from
home town news to prospective
term paper data. It contains about
1,500 current periodicals and
newspapers from large cities
throughout the country. Informa-
tion on magazine articles can be

found in the Readers Guide placed
on the desks. Upon presentation
of call slips and identification
cards, the magazine is brought up
from the stacks.
Collateral Reading
Collateral reading books for
English, history and political sci-
ence courses are found on reserve
in the Angell Hall Study Hall lo-
cated at the north end of Angell
Hall. These books are to be read
only in the study hall and circu-
late only for overnight and week-
end use at home.
Specialized school departmental
libraries are located all over cam-
pus. The medical reading room,
on the second floor of the General
Library, has books relating to the
fields of medicine and nursing.
The natural science library is on
the second floor of the Natural
Science Building, the economics
and mathematics library on the
third floor of Angell Hall, the Ed-
ucation school library at Univer-
sity High School, the engineering
school library on the second floor
of West Engineering and the Law
Research Library is located at the
Law Quadrangle.

PROPOSED MATERNITY HOSPITAL-Pictured is the plans for
the proposed new Maternity Hospital. The old one was condemned
last year as being a "fire-trap." Excavations for the new building
were started in June of this year, and the building, located east
of the main hospital, may be ready for occupation in 1950.
Medical School Enrollment
Is. Close to CapcCity-Seevers_

A'

i

115 W. Liberty St.
mO Royal Portable Typewriters
s" Typewriter Service (All Makes)
jo.s Fountain Pens and Pencils.
i-' Expert Pen-Maker Repair Service
k, Stationery and Leather Goods
i' Hobby Tools and Supplies
--- Writers Think of RIDER'S ---

One hundred and fifty students
will enter the Medical School this
fall.
Associate Dean Seevers an-
nounced that 1825 applications for
admission were received, but that
with present clinical facilities, 150
freshmen is very close to maxi-
mum capacity.
The Medical School has in the
past been criticized for not taking
more students, in view of rural
shortages of doctors, but Dean
Seevers says that the lack of
physicians in small communities
is due mainly to the greater in-
centive for doctors to settle in

I

EXPERIENCED HELPERS:
Student Experts To Contribute
Advice on Courses in LS&A

,

T111

The STATE DRUG Co.
Serves' the Students
* DRUG DEPARTMENT
* PARTY PICTURE SERVICE
: TOBACCO AND CANDY
e FOUNTAIN AND
LUNCHEON SERVICE
!:" COSMETICS
. GIFTS

Student Experts, a service of the
Cultural and Educational Com-
mittee of the Studnt Legislature,
will be on hand before and during
fall rgistration to assist students
in selecting LS&A courses.
Function of the advisory group
is limited to giving advice tQ stu-
dents on the nature and content
of the various courses. Student
Experts will attempt to help stu-
dents seeking advice by giving
them some understanding of how
the course fits in with the stu-
dent's schedule.
Information
They may also indicate how
much work is involved in the
course in question, what sort of
examinations are given and re-
lated matters. No statements con-
cerning faculty members will be
made, however.
The body is composed of volun-
teer students who are majors in
their several advisory fields and
who have a B average or better.
Representation
An attempt will be made to have
each of the departments in the
literary collegerepresented by one
Student Expert.
Students who wish to take ad-
vantage of the services offered by
the group should contact the of-

Remember:

i
i

fice of Student Affairs, Rm. 2,
University Hall for further infor-
mation.
Fifty-Eighth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staffj
Lida Dailes ........... Managing Editor
Kenneth Lowe........Associate Editor
Joseph R. Walsh, Jr. ..Sports Editor
Junior Staff: Ivan Kelley, Barney Las-
chever, Craig Wilson, Fredrica Win-
ters.
Sophomore Staff: Jim Brown, Frank
Butorac, James Duras, Shelton Mur-
phy, John Neufeld, John Quanrud.
Business Staff
Business Staff
RobertC. James. Business Manager
Harry Berg ....... Advertising Manager
Robert McFee......Accounts Manager
James Norby ....... Classified Manager
Ernest Mayerfeld . Circulation Manager
Servicers: Stan Zeitlin, Marion Sibille,
Victor Orn, Bill Rohrbach, Clara
Davis, Jim Watt, Jim Burdeaux.
Ken Scobie, Jim Brown
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is. exclusively
entitled to the use for re-publication
of all news dispatches credited to it or
otherwise credited in this newspaper.
All rights of re-publication of all other
matters herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann
Arbor. Michigan, as second-class mail
matter.
Member
Associated Collegiate Press
1947-48
4 -- ---.--.- -- - -

larger cities, where better medical
facilities are available.
Horse and Buggy
It is difficult for a doctor to
study the most modern techniques
of medicine and then go back to
the horse-and-buggy days, Dean
Seevers said.
To alleviate the situation, the
University has designed a course
for training general practitioners,
and great decentralization of pub-
lic hospitals in the State is
planned, so that doctors may
be distributed more equitably
throughout the State.
The Medical School may be able
to expand its teaching program if
the plan for a Medical Center at
the University is realized, bqt the
project may not be started for sev-
eral years yet.
Excavations for the new Mater-
nity Hospital were started June 9
of this year, and the building,
which is located east of the main
hospital, may be ready for occu-
pancy in January 1950.
VA Hospital
A 500-bed Veterans Hospital has
been approved by the President.
No exact location has been an-
nounced yet, but the $10 million
structure will probably be erected
just across the Huron River near
Geddes Road, 11/4 miles from the
University Hospital. It is hoped
that the Veterans Hospital, which
will be completely staffed by
members of the University, under
the direction of a,VA administra-
tor, will become operative in 2 to
3 years.
The Medical School continues to
be active in the field of medical
research. Research projects are
sponsored by the United States
Public Health Service pharmaceu-
tical houses and private donors.
Some of the studies sponsored
by the Public Health Service in-
clude cancer research ,hyperten-
sion, acclimatization to heat, and
central nervous system depres-
sants.
Tickets ..
(Continued from Page 1)
forfeits his claim to that section
and must accept a season ticket
in a lower section, Burton said.
If a student wishes to sit with
other persons in his own section,
they must present their stubs at
the same time. One student may
obtain tickets for other students
by submitting their stubs with his
own.
Married students who wish to
sit with their wives must drop
down one classification level to do
so. Student activities passes at
reduced rates will be availble to
wives of students. These passes
will admit the owner to all home
football games as well as to other
campus athletic events'.

Welcome

I - " mm mm m

The Campus Churches

Activities for Church Night (Sept. 17)
the Friday of Orientation Week
and for Registration Weekend0...

n

The STATE DRUG Co.
Corner State and Packard
Phone 4344

You!

TI

:Ir

Efrigarn Di
offers PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE to Students
in
Reporting, Advertising Layout
Organization and dnd Design
Analysis of News
The advertising department of
The Michigan Daily offers tryouts The Michigan Daily offers you an
exceptional opportunities to gain excellent opportunity to acquire
practical training and experience practical experience in the field
in newswriting, feature writing, of Advertising Layout and De-

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron Avenue
Friday at 6:00 P.M.: Steak Fry for new stud-
ents.
Sunday at 10:00 A.M.: Church School Class.
11:00: Church Worship.
6:00: Roger Williams Guild.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Friday at 6:00: Buffet Supper and social eve-
ning for new students.
Sunday at 11:00 .A.M.: Service for Student
Congregation.
5:30 P.M.: Supper Meeting of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Friday at 6:00 P.M.: Outdoor Supper for new
students. Social evening.
Sunday at 10:45 AM.: Worship Service.
4:00 P.M.: Informal Reception and Tea for
Westminster Guild members and friends.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZA-
TION, UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN
Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.: Regular Meetings at
Lane Hall.
Sundays at 10:30 A.M.: Church Services, Ball
Room of Michigan League.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Friday at 6:00 P.M.: Buffet Supper for new
students.
Sunday at 11:00 A.M.: Service of worship.
6:30 P.M.: Supper discussion of Unitar-
ian Student Group.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND RE-
FORMED CHURCH
423 S. Fourth Avenue
Friday at 6:00 P.M.: Buffet Supper for new
students, followed by Get-Acquainted So-
cial Hour.
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:15 P.M.: First Regular Student Guild
meeting.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
2101 Hill Street
Friday, 2 to 5 P.M.: Open House.
7:45 P.M.: Sabbath Eve Service..
8:30 P.M.: Social Hour.
Saturday, 8:00 P.M.: House Party.
Sunday, 2 to 5 P.M.: Open House.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Thompson and William St.
Friday, 8 to 12: OPEN HOUSE' in clubrooms
of the Newman Club.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, and 12:00.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill St.
Friday at 6:15 P.M.: Buffet supper for new
students at the Center, 1304 Hill St.
Sunday at 8:30 A.M.: Breakfast at the Center.
Bible Study at 9:10.
10:30 A.M.: Worship services at Zion
Lutheran Church, E. Washington and S.
Fifth Ave. and at Trinity Lutheran
Church, E. William and S. Fifth Ave
5:30 P.M.: Lutheran Student Association
Meeting, Zion Hall, 30,9 E. Washington.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
N. Division at Catherine St.
Friday at 6:30 P.M.: Dinner for new students
at Canterbury House, Episcopal Student
Center, 218 N. Division St.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Student
Breakfast.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Supper and
Discussion.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Sundays at 10:45: Divine Wirship.
Programs for student veterans and their
families. Interdenomination. Worship-
Sacred Music-Discussion--Recreation.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Sts.
Friday, 8 to 11: Open House for new students
at the Congregational-Disciples Guild
House, 438 Maynard St.
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
6:00 P.M.: Congregational - Disciples
Guild Supper and Program at the Con-
gregational Church.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 N. Main St.
Friday at 7:00 P.M.: Vesper Service, Banquet,
and Social evening, sponsored by the
Orthodox Student Club.
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.: Mass.

headline writing, page make-up
and editorial work. All eligible
second-semested freshmen, sopho-
mores and uperclassmen inter-
ested in trying out for The Daily
editorial staff should attend a

sign. If you have had no previous
training you will be given free in-
struction. If you have had class-
room training, you will test your
ability with actual practice. You
can obtain business experience
and personal contact with ad-
vertisers that you can secure no
other way.

THE
Presents the Finest
Motion Picture Entertainment
PANIC
Vi" aiuRomance in The Real Thing.
THE KING'S JESTER
The Singing of Tagliavini is Superb.
MARIUS
Raiiiu and Charpin at their Best.
FAN NY
Brilliant Sequel to Maritus.
. ... %- - ... 1 I1. .

meeting
ning of
previous

to be held at the begin-
the fall semester. No
experience is necessary.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State Street
Tuesday thru Thursday of Orientation Week:
Tea and Open House, 3 to 5.
Friday, at 6:30 P.M.: Orientation Banquet
and Party.

1'1

i

11

11

1

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan