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August 04, 1948 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

it
Y

PAGE FOfLM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1948

Eileen Farrell Will Inaugurate- 7
Choral UnionCocr Series
_ Coner

(Continued from Page 1)
the Choral Union Concert Series
will be violinist Ginette Neveu who
will perform on Jan. 8. Miss Neveu
is a native of France and made
her first public appearance at the
age of seven and a half. She has
appeared in this country with the
Boston Symphony and the New
York Philharmonic-Symphony.
Vladimir Horowitz
On Feb. 11 piano virtuoso Vladi-
mir Horowitz will perform. Horo-
witz has gained an enviable inter-
national reputation for his artis-
try and superb musicianship. He
made his American debut in 1928.
Nathan Milstein, violinist, will
deliver the ninth concert of the
series on Mar. 4. He has toured the
United States and Canada 18
times and has made innumerable
tours on the Continent. Fritz
Kreisler has called Milstein "the
greatest of today's younger gen-
eration of violinists."
Chicago Symphony
The concluding concert will be
given. by the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra with Fritz Busch as
guest conductor. Founded in 1891,
the Chicago Symphony is the
third oldest orchesra in America.
The Extra Concert Series, also
held at Hill Auditorium, will fea-
ture Marian Anderson, the Cin-
cinnati Symphony Orchestra, Ru-
dolf Serkin, Jascha Heifetz, and
the Indianapolis Symphony Or-
chestra.
Marian Anderson
Miss Anderson, contralto, who

will appear on Oct. 14, sings a rep-
ertoire which includes classic com-
positions, operatic arias and spir-
ituals. Although American by
birth, Miss Anderson was "discov-
ered" in Paris.
Thor Johnson, University alum-
nus, will conduct the Cincinnati
Symphony Orchestra on Nov. 15
in the second of the extra Con-
certs. Ranked among the six ma-
jor orchestras of the United
States, the Cincinnati Symphony
is well known to Ann Arbor con-
cert-goers from its many appear-
ances here.
Rudolph Serkin
Pianist Rudolf Serkin will per-
form on Dec. 3. He has appeared
in practically every American city
and numerous concerts abroad.
According to one critic, his play-
ing shows "depth of perfection
and fire of temperament."
The fourth concert of the Extra
Concert Series will be given by
Jascha Heifetz on Feb. 19. Heifetz,
owner of several violins, including
a Stradivarius, has been acclaimed
internationally on his world tours
and tours of the United States and
Canada.
The Indianapolis Symphony
Orchestra, conducted by Fabian
Sevitsky will give the last of the
Extra Concerts on Mar. 13. A New
York music critic called the or-
chestra "well balanced and co-or-
dinated in its elements and capa-
ble of highly dramatic interpreta-
tion."

FLYING BOAT WRECKED BY PIRATES-This piece of wreck-
age of a Cathay Pacific Catalina flying boat was recovered from
the sea four miles off Macao, Portuguese colony on the China
coast, where it crashed recently, carrying 25 persons to their
deaths. A lone survivor, Wong Yu, has confessed, according to
Macao Police Commissioner Luis A. M. Paletti that he and three
other Chinese caused the crash by attempting to commandeer
the plane in piracy plot.
'DAILY' TRAVELLERS:
American College Students
Work Study, Play inEurope

illI

ft

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of a series of articles by two former
Daily editors now in Europe.)
By ARCHIE PARSONS
and JACK MARTIN
ABOARD THE S. S. MARINE
TIGER EN ROUNTE TO LE-
HAVRE, (Delayed) - Approxi-
mately 600 American college stu-
dents, among them seven from the
University of Michigan, are near-
ing the end of a nine-day voyage
aboard this ship which will take
them to all parts of Europe on
tours, to universities, and to live
and work among Europeans for
the summer months.
This group is only a small part
of the thousands of American stu-
dents who have taken advantage
of opportunities to travel to every
sector of the globe during the
summekof 1948. Many of them
are making the trip aboard the
"Tiger" and its sister ship, the
"Marine Jumper," which were do-
nated by the United States Mari-
time Commission intconjunction
with the United States Lines to

A Cool Place To Dine on Fine Food!
LANTERN GARDEN

provide low-cost travel facilities
for students and professors.
Sightseeing To Study
American students are invading
Europe for every purpose from
sightseeing to serious study. For
example, Michigan's Dorothy Dow,
Marjorie Reber, Charles Strick-
land, and Bill Mundus are on their
way to England to take part in
the British Work Camp Project;
Norm Talner, "U" med student,
will work in a hospital in Oslo,
Norway while attending a confer-
ence there; and the two writers
will study Europeon reconstruc-
tion problems at the University of
Zurich in Switzerland.
Altogether the ship's roster in-
cludes passengers representing no
less than 30 organizations and
every one of the 48 states. Not
only college students but emeritus
professors and precocious young-
sters are on their way to do their
bit for international harmony and
good will.
Babel Afloat
An orientation program, spon-
sored by the American Friends
Service Committee, has coliducted
classes in German, French, Ital-
ian, Russian, Hindustani, Hunga-
rian, and Norwegian each' day.
When the informal practice ses-
sions gather in the gun tubs and
other portions of the sun deck, the
"Tiger" resembles a sea-going
Tower of Babel. In addition, the
program has provided political
discussions, a variety show, folk
dances, and movies running the
gamut from the documentary,
"Seeds of Destiny," to "Sioux City
Sue" with Gene Autry.
Life on the "Tiger" is far from
the rigorous, ' Spartan existence
which many would expect on a
low-cost student ship. The ship's
larder was packed with every kind
of provision from roast duckling
to raspberry pie, and on the
Fourth of July a full-course sir-
loin steak banquet was served.
Furthermore, the passengers even
had their own daily paper, the
"Tiger Rag," which carried the
latest world news flashed from the
States by wireless.
And the coeds had no curfew.

Two Operas
To Be Given
On Weekend
Kellogg, Ono Head
Casts at Mendelssohn
Howard Kellogg and Masako
Ono will take lead roles in the
double opera bill presented this
week by the speech department
and the School of Music.
Kellogg will portray Brack
Weaver in the new Kurt Weill
opera, "Down in the Valley,"
which will be broadcast through-
out the nation by the National
Broadcasting Company. Other
leading singing roles in the Amer-
ican folk opera will be played by
Norma Heyde, Don Plott and Dale
Thompson.
Rest of Cast
John Cottrell, William Brom-
field, Ted Heusel, Bartram Gable,
Harper Maynee, Jack Wilcox and
Arthur McCombie will complete
the cast.
Supporting Miss Ono in the
companion opera, "La Serva Pa-
drona," will be Robert Sill and
James Drummond. Written by G.
B. Perglese in 1733, "La. Serva
Padrona" is a short lyric comedy
in two acts.
Wayne Dunlap will conduct the
orchestra for both productions.
Director of the double bill is
Prof. Valentine Windt, who is as-
sisted by Oren Parker, are direc-
tor; Harold Ross, assistant are di-
rector; Jack Bender, technician,
and Frances S. Goodman, cos-
tumiere.
Performances
The program will be presented
Thursday through Saturday at 8
p.m. in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre with the broadcast matinee be-
ing given at 2:15 p.m., Saturday.
In addition, an extra performance
of the double bill will be presented
at 8 p.m., Monday, August 9.
Good seats are still available
for the matinee performance, it
was announced yesterday.
Campus
Highlights
Speech Assembly...
Prof. Oren Parker of Yale Uni-
versity will address the final
Speech Assembly of the Session
at 3 p.m. today in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Prof. Parker's subject will be
"The Designer in the Theatre."
The meeting is open to the
public.
* . *
Saxophone Recital ...
Sigurd Rascher, great saxophon-
ist, will give a recital at 8 p.m.
today in conjunction with Philip
Duey, baritone, and Joseph Brink-
man, pianist.
The recital, which will be held
in the Rackham Lecture Hall,
will include Sonata No. 4 by
Gaillard, 3 songs by Charles
Ives, and workssby Gershwin,
Bach and Purcell. The Ives
songs, to be sung by Prof. Duey,
have been called decidedly orig-
inal: "The Housatonic at Stock-
bridge" has polytonality, while
"Charlie Rutlage" and "The
Greatest Man" are tonally more
conventional.
* a «
Women Ushers ...
Women students interested in
ushering at the Monday night per-
formance of "Down in the Valley"
and "La Serva Padrona" should

sign up immediately in the League
Undergraduate Office.

The
City Beat
Ann Arbor's widely publicized
dogs are destined to ride in style
in the future.
The Ann Arbor Humane Society
announced yesterday that it has
purchased a new panel truck to
serve as an animal ambulance.
The dogs formerly were crammed
into a station wagon.
* * *
A Washtenaw raccoon must be
complacently enjoying a good rac-
coon laugh today.
Four hunters who were stalk-
ing this raccoon 'just before dawn
yesterday morning were appre-
hended by two Conservation offi-
cers before they could catch up
with the animal.
The four hunters are resting
quietly in the county jail awaiting
trial for hunting out of season.
* * *
Monday night the City Council
approved an amendment to the
building code permitting the erec-
tion of steel and porcelain enam-
eled steel restaurants without
yards being required.

INSIDE U.S.A.:
Students Can Still Sign for
International Center Tour

Foreign and American students
still have an opportunity to sign
up for the four week bus tour
sponsored by the International
Center.
Altogether, thirty students will'
go sightseeing in grand style, vis-
iting Chicago, Salt Lake City, San
Francisco, Los Angeles, St. Louis
and many other famous cities.
Leisurely Traveling
Although the trip will cover
8,000 miles, traveling will be leis-
urely, and ambitious students can
even have their summer session
grades sent after them. Monday,
August 16, is the starting date,
and the tour will arrive back in
Ann Arbor on Tuesday, Sept. 14.
The time schedule calls for a
two day stopover in Chicago on
the way out and on overnight stop
on the way back, two days in
Omaha, three days in Salt Lake
City, two days in Portland, Oregon,
three and a half days in San Fran-
cisco, four days in L.A., one day

Continuous
From 1 P.M.

CLOSING FOR SUMMER: LAST WEEK
SALE OF FINE ORIENTAL RUGS
30 to 40% Off on all pieces
We still have several choice living, dining, library rugs.
One 9.7 x 14.6 Ispahao. Scatters, runners, heart rugs,
mats in all sizes.
N. L. MANGOUNI
334 S. Fourth Ave. Phone 6878
- o <;;;;o ;;;o o 0 30c <;;;;;;;>o m X;;;;;>0 o04;;=
HOME of GOOD FOOD
418 East Washington
Phone 9717
serving
' FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS
0- Lunch 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.
also _
High Class SMORGASBORD v
(Come and eat all you want)
Daily, except Friday, 11:30 to 1:30 and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:00 P.M.
Catering to Wedding Breakfast and Bridge Clubs
" 0 0c= o 0o<==O<=:>om oa==>o cc=!o

- Last Times Today -
sfataring PEGGY CUMMINS
CHARLES COBURN
with LLOYD NOWA
-Starts Thursday-

6

,

in St. Louis, and shorter stops in
Flagstaff, Albuquerque and Kan-
sas City.
Education and Entertainment
Homer E. Underwood, Interna-
tional Center program director and
conductor of the tour, promises
participants much entertainment
and free food along the way, in
addition to the educational value
of the tour. The Junior Chamber
of Commerce in Ann Arbor has co-
operated with similar organiza-
tions in other places in arranging
for banquets, and tours through
industrial areas.
Trained guides have been en-
gaged to conduct students to local
beauty spots and points of inter-
elt. But enterprising students will
still have time for independent ex-
plorations of the countryside.
For further information, the In-
ternational Center may be con-
tacted.

w yCro ,
A WARMER BROS. F CTUO

COOL

h. ...

American and Chinese Dishes
IAIR-CONDITIONED
Quick Service --- Plate Luncheons
CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN TO TAKE OUT
Reasonable Prices

i

Movie Thriller
To Be Shown
"The Lady Vanishes," an Alfred
Hitchcock thriller, will be shown
Friday through Sunday at 7 and 9
p.m. in the Kellogg Auditorium, it
was announced yesterday.
The film, which is being co-
sponsored by the AVC, will mark
the final presentation of the Art
Cinema League's summer sched-
ule.
Filmed in England and starring
Michael Redgrave, Paul Lukas,
Margaret Lockwood and Dame
May Whitty, the picture is re-
garded as one of Hitchcock's
classic productions and was influ-
ential in establishing the director's
wide popularity with American au-
diences.

THE LADY
VANISHES

THE.LADYSid Frank Cheats at Cards
VANISHES

Friday Aug. 6
Saturday Aug. 7
Sunday Aug. 8

TH E LADY
VANISHES

Fri., Sat., Sun.
Two showings each night at
7 P.M. & 9 P.M.
KELLOGG AUD.
(Dental School)

Located
613 E. Liberty,
by Michigan Theatre

Phone
6380

Open Every
Day Except
.Monday

Snatch Up These Bargains
HALF-YEAR SALE

G
Giv
for
wit
as s
the
do

NA

-

the foundation
of natural beauty

I

antzen
I RDLES
lowy as a wand
ve yourself an exciting new figure
fall's exciting new clothes,
h a curve-controlling Jantzen,
mooth-fitting as your own skin,
se magical little minimizers
wonders to you and for you.

W0'lldeqj U1d
THE CORNER HOUSE
AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 to 7:00 P.M.
Sundays, 12 Noon to 3 P.M.
Closed Mondays - 202 SOUTH THAYER
STAGE COACH INN
A.A. STEAKS - SEA FOOD - FRIED CHICKEN
PARTIES - BANQUETS - RECEPTIONS
For Reservations, Call 6004 - 503 E. Huron St.
GRANADA CAFE
Good Food Is Good Health - Open for Your Convenience
Daily 7:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
Sundays 11:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
313 South State
_ _a_._ - - - - -

Many at Half Price
DRESSES
$7.49 to $19.95
Large group of crepes, shantungs and
gabardines for sizes 9-17, 10-44 and
Formerly $14.95 to $39.95
WOOL COATS
$17.00 to $27.50
Long or short styles in pure wool. Black,
navy or colors
Formerly $39.95 to $59.95

- While They Last
WOOL SUITS
$25.00
Group of navy, black, green, brown or
grey gabardine in sizes 10-44 and
181/2-241'/2.
Formerly $49.95 to $59.95
BLOUSES
$1.49 to $3.98
Cotton or rayon sheers, also crepes some
peasant styles. Sizes 30-44.
Formerly to $7.95

PAJAMAS-.. $2.98
Cotton prints in sizes 32-40.
Formerly to $6.00.
SLIPS ... 91.98 lun

SKIRTS
$2.49 to $4.95

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