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August 01, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-08-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 1948 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
UC Co-ops Lose Rights
As 'Fraternal' Group

Krupp Heads
Sentenced for
War Crimes

-

YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM:
Fresh Air Camp Committee
Plans To Increase Activities

Student Cooperatives on the
campus of the University of Cali-
fornia lost their battle to retain
exemption from Berkeley, Cali-~
fornia, taxesras a business estab-
lishment.
The coops failed to convince the
local city council that they were a
"fraternal organization," which
are exempt from the $100 license,
according to the Daily Californian.
The Berkeley city attorney de-
clared that the coops, which house
more than 1,000 US students, "do
not select members in the manner
that is ordinarily used by organ-
izations that are generally con-
sidered as 'fraternal'."
(The coops formerly enjoyed
freedom from the tax).
* 4..
The University of Texas is al-
ready hot and bothered about
stirring up 'rah-rah' spirit for the
Texas-LSU gridiron clash which
is still several months away, ac-
cording to the Summer Texan.
So the Texan displays a pleas-
ing front page picture of the type
of girl Texas is famous for (attired
in a manner to gain much sun-
tan) smilingly taming the LSU
' tiger.
(The 'Tiger' in the photograph
is the work of the Texan's art and
retouching staff.)
* * *
The problem of draft regis-
tration has Ohio State Univer-
sity officials nervously chewing
their fingernails, according to
the Ohio State Lantern.
Although they don't know for
sure, they think that the regis-
tration is going to land right
smack in the middle of summer
session Quarter Finals.
Mexican students in U. S. col-
leges will suffer if the peso of
their native land is devalued, a
University of Texas foreign stu-

dent advisor warned recently, ac-
cording to the Summer Texan.
The present situation, wherein
peso-holders are attempting to
unload' the currency in exchange
for American dollars may result
in a more than 60 per cent slash
in value of the Mexican Student's
money, he indicated.
"Mexican students usually op-
erate on a slimmer margin than
other foreign students because of
the nearness of their home coun-
tries," the official stated. He add-
ed that the monetary situation
mignt curtail future enrollments
of Mexican scholars in American
inscztutions
A "curvaceous; ex remey good
looking" University of Wiscon-
sin coed who attends summer
school and doubles as life-guard
at a nearby beach, recently told
a Daily Cardinal reporter that
the men are getting "pretty
close" to wearing a masculine
version of the now-traditional
'French bathing suit.'
She referred to the latest edi-
tions with "the lattice work up the
sides."
Due to the shortage of class-
room space, the University of Illi-
nois recently cleaned out the
basement of Smith Music Hall,
according to the Daily Illini.
The heirlooms removed and+
taken to another building includ-
ed: "stuffed animals, skeletons
and miscellaneous bones."
* * *
The Ranger' University of Texas
version of the Gargoyle, is short
of help for the fall semester, ac-
cording to the Summer Texan.
Accordingly, they recently pub-j
lished the qualifications for the
job: Must know how to "type, be
likeable and not-too-inhibited."

SUPERFORTS COME OUT OF STORAGE-These B-29 Super-
fortresses "cocooned" and "pickled" at Oavia-Nonthan Air Force
Base, at Tucson, Ariz., are being stripped of their protective coat-
ings and are being readied for flight. The number being prepared
is secret and the number of planes placed under protective covering
never has been announced officially.
RADIO PREMIERE.
New Opera To Be Broadcast
From Mendelssohn by NBC

NUEP,NBERG, Germany, July
31 -0'-Alfried Krupp von Bohlen
und Halbach, 41-year-old heir to
the vast Krupp munitions empire,
was sentenced today to serve 12
years in prison for exploiting slave
labor and plundering occupied
countries under the Nazi regime.
An American military court
convicted Krupp and 10 high
Krupp officials of war crimes in
a 50,000-word judgment handed
down by a three-man tribunal.
Sentences ranging from 34
months to 12 years were meted
out to the other 10 defendants.
Of the 12 men tried, only Karl
Heinrich Pfirsch, 71-year-old dean
of the Krupp board of directors,
was acquitted on all counts.
The judges reached a verdict
that the convicted men were guilty
beyond "a reasonable doubt."
The sentences came after a six-
month trial.
Those convicted were:
Krupp, 12 years;
Ewald 0. Loeser, Finance and
Administration Chief, seven years;
Eduard Houdremont, Luxem-
bourg-born metalurgist, 10 years;
Erich Mueller, designed of the
"Gustav" gun which blasted Stal-
ingrad, 12 years;
Friedrich W. Janssen, head of
the Krupp Berlin office, 10 years,
Karl F. Eberhardt, head of ma-
chine sales and war material, nine
years; and Max Otto Ihn, person-
nel chief, nine years.
Also convicted were Heinrich L.
Kor:chan, director of Bertha
works in Breslau, six years; Fried-
rich Von Buelow, Krupp liaison
man with the gestapo, convicted
on slave labor charge, 12 years;
Werner L. Lehmann, labor pro-
curement official, six years; and
Hans Gustav Kupke, head of for-
eign workers camps and experi-
mental firing ranges, two years.
South African Lecture
Leslie Goldberg, University stu-
dent from South Africa, will dis-
cuss the political situation in his
continent, at a meeting of the
Unitarian Student Group, 6:30
p.m. today, at 1917 Washtenaw
Rd.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond in a series of articles dealing with
the work done at the Fresh Air Camp
in the summer and the proposed
student recreation center to be lo-
cated there in the winter.
By FREDI WINTERS
The Executive Committee of the
Fresh Air Camp has underway
many plans to increase the scope
of the Camp and make it an im-
portant adjunct to student recrea-
tion facilities in the fall, winter
and spring.
In line with their plan to acti-
vate student interest in the Camp
by having each major organiza-'
tion adopt one project, West Quad
has p'ledged a motor launch; IFC
and Pan-Hellenic are supplying
funds for a beach house, and As-
sembly has provided money for
winterizing the main lodge.
Passed Planning
Some of the Camp projects have
passed the planning stage. Married
veterans and their families will

ITS A BUNGALOW-Bill Beven,
lumber yard employe at Esther-
ville, Iowa, puts the last shingle
on his new Model T Ford's roof.
Standard models don't come
equipped with this nailed up and
pitched version of the regular
cover top,

have the use of the Fresh Air
Camp for a month from the time
the campers leave until the Uni-
versity opens in the fall. Veterans
interested in attending the Camp
may apply at the Dean of Stu-
dent's Office.
The Executive Committee, com-
posed of representatives from the
residence halls, Union, IFC, Pan-
Hellenic, AVC, and the University
administration, also have plans
for making the camp available for
week-end outings.
Group Plans
They hope to convert two cabins
housing 20 people for winter use.
Kitchen facilities in the main
lodge will be open to students
as soon as the water supply is in
suitable condition for winter use.
University busses will take stu-
dents who make appropriate ar-
rangements out to the Camp. Dr.
William Morse, director of the
'Camp.

J acoAOand

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The stage of Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre will be transformed intc
a broadcast studio Saturday af-
ternoon when the National Broad-
casting Compani transmits a new
opera across the nation for the
first time.
The composition, Kurt Weill's
"Down in the Valley," forms part
of a double bill of opera being
presented by the Department of
Speech and the School of Music.
The companion piece is "La Serva
Padrona," by G. B. Pergolese. Only
the Weill opera will be broadcast,
however.
'Birmingham Jaii'
First presented at Indiana Uni-
versity last month, "Down in the
Valley" is built around the popular
American folk song, "Birmingham,
Jail." Its story concerns the ro-
mance and imprisonment of one
Brack Weaver, who was sentenced
to the Birmingham prison after
slaying a man for the sake of his
sweetheart.
Weill, a 48-year-old German-
American composer has won wide
acclaim in Europe for his nine
operas. In the more popular vein
he has written the score for such
Broadway successes as "Knicker-
bocker Holiday," "Lady in the
Dark," "One Touch of Venus" and
"Street Scene.'
Already Performed
"Down in the Valley" has al-
ready received a great deal of at-
tention and will be presented on
tour in the fall by Ernest Hoff-
man and his company.
"La Serva Padrona," in con-

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trast with Weill's opus, is the old-
est opera currently included ir the
repertory of opera companies.
Written in 1733, it is a short lyric
comedy in two acts.
Program Time
The program will be presented
Thursday through Saturday at 8
p.m., with the broadcast Satur-
day matinee beginning at 2:15 p.m.
In addition, an extra presentation
will be given at 8 p.m., Mon-
day, August 9.
Patrons are advised to notice
the change in curtain time for the
special matinee. Originally sched-
uled to begin at 2:30 p.m., the
program will start promptly at
2:15 p.m. in order to accommodate
the National Broadcasting Com-
pany. "La Serva Padrona" will be
presented first, with the Weill
opera taking the air at 3 p.m.
Tickets for the broadcast per-
formance are still available at the
box office, it has been announced.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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compositions by Pugnani, Purcell.
Bach, Gilliard, LeClair, and a
group of contemporary works. Pro-
fessor Duey will sing three songsj
by Charles Ives. The general pub-
lie is invited.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memo-
rial Hall: Art Masterworks,
framed color reproductions to be
loaned to Michigan Schools.
Weekdays 9:30-12 and 2-5; Sun-
days 2-5. The public is cordially
invited.
Events Today
Graduate Outing Club meets at
2:30 Sun., Aug. 1, at the north-
west 'entrance of Rackham Bldg.
for swimming and canoeing. All
graduate students welcome.
Rev. F. Harvey McCann of De-
troit, Michigan, will be the speaker
at the Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship meeting Sunday afternoon at
4:30 in the basement of Lane Hall.
Mr. McCann's topic will be "The
Basis of the Christian Faith." The
meeting will be followed by a coffee
hour.
University Community Center:
5 p.m. today. Wives Club Picnic.
Imogene Blatchley, chairman. Ev-
eryone meet at Community Center
to be sure of a ride.
Coming Events
The Hindustan Association is
presenting a program of motion
pictures Mon., August 2, Room 316

, Michigan Union, 8 p.m.
The program will include: "Mel-
ody of Hindustan," "Handicrafts
of South India," and "Our Her-
itage." The public is cordially in-
vited.
American Veterans Committee:
Cafeteria Supper Meeting, 6:45
Tursday evening, August 5, in the
Russian Tea Room at the League.
Wives and friends of members are
welcome. Plans for fall semester
to be discussed. This is final meet-
ing of Summer Session.
University Community Center:
Tues., Aug. 5, 8 p.m. Bridge Ses-
sion. Everyone welcome.
Churches
Wesleyan Guild: 5:30 p.m.-Dr.
Howard Y. McCluskey will speak
on "Christianity: a Means or an
End?" as part of the summer series
on "Christianity Tested."
6:30 p.m.-Supper and Fellow-
ship.
Lutheran Student. Association:
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet at the Parish Hall at
5:30 with supper at 6:00 and pro-
gram following. Rev. Howard Yea-
ger, Pastor of Zion Lutheran
Church will speak on "Christi-
anity versus Existing Philosophies"
Westminster Guild: Westminster
Guild will meet in the Social Hall
of the Presbyterian Church at 5:00
o'clock. Dr. W. M. Wiley will talk
on "Christianity versus Commu-
nism." Refreshments following.
Congregational - Disciples Guild:
The Congregational-Disciples guild
will hold Open House at 7:00 p.m.
at the Guild House, 438 Maynard
Street.

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