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July 28, 1948 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILY_

EDNESDA

CONOMIC SORES':'
Progressive Party Convention
Emphasizes Civil Liberties

Aerial Photo
Work Offered

I'

(Continued from Page 1)

state), all doubts would have been
dispelled by the tremendous ova-
tions given to Wallace, Taylor, and
Robeson.
No Jim Crow -
The resounding chant "Jim
Crow must go!" clearly indicated
determination to wipe out all
forms of segregation so disgrace-
ful to a democratic country. A
sample of the attack on segre-
gation is the resolution dealing
with the armed forces:
"Jim Crow in the armed serv-
ices is the American version of
Hitler's practices of racial super-
iority which American soldiers
fought to destroy. Its continuation
by the two old parties makes
hollow any pretense that young
Americans are today being drafted
to insure democracy at home or
overseas.
"We therefore say to the Dem-
ocratic President: Eliminate Jim-
Crow by executive order. We say
to the Republican Congress: Elim-
inate Jim-Crow by legislative act.'
We say to both old parties: "Jim
Crow must go!"
Other Issues
This sample of the realistic

handling of current American
problems was duplicated in state-
ments dealing with peace, espe-
cially the denouncing of the war
and "get tough" policies of the Re-
publicans and Democrats, and the
call for repeal of the present
draft; the statements on freedom
especially for political, religious,
and racial minorities; and the
statements on abundance with a
strong labor plank calling for re-
peal of the Taft-Hartley Law,
elimination of pay differentials
based on race, a call for enact-
ment of a minimum wage act, and
a full-scale Federal vocational and
on-the-job training program.
All Areas
This independent youth organ-
ization has set out to work effec-
tively in all areas of American
life to bring to realization an un-
complainingly progressive pro-
gram. There is no absence of
qualities needed to make a group
effective-deep belief in principles,
enthusiasm for the cause, and
willingness to work hard, as has
been demonstrated by a tireless
group of convention delegates who
worked day and night in the con-
vention.

THE NAVY'S largest airplane, the 92-ton Lockheed Constitution, makes a low pass over the runway
at Patuxent, Md., prior to landing at the Naval Air Station there. The craft completes a 2,600-
mile non-stop flight from Moffet Field, Calif., in 10 hours and 19 minutes.

9

wTATE r

.i

NOW!

35c 'til 5:00

Starts Peggy Cummings - in -
Sunday "GREEN GRASS OF WYOMING"
ENDING TODAY
M ICHIGAN 35c until 5 P.M.
j AVE YOU HEARD ABOUT CARY and THE BISHOP'S Wf

Olnl
Campus
Highlights
Psychologists...
Five movies will be reviewed by
faculty members, graduate stu-
dents and psychology students at;
1 and 3 p.m. today in Rm. 2054
Natural Science Building.
They are "Some Psychological
Factors in Visual Depth Perce-
ption," "The Experimental Psy-
chology of Vision," "Speeding,
Your Reading," "Reactions in
Plants and Animals," and "Dis-
turbances in Human Behavior."
The groups viewing the movies will
rate them for suitability for use'
in Psychology 31 in the fall.
Linguistic Institute ... .
Prof. J. R.. Firth, of the Univer-
sity of London, will lecture on,
"Sounds and Prosodies," at they
weekly luncheon conference of the,
Linguistic Institute, at 1 p.m. to-
day, in the Union.
* * *
Speech Lecture ...
Prof. William M. Sattler, Uni-
versity of Oklahoma professor of
speech and visiting faculty mem-
ber in the University speech de-
partment, will lecture on "Free
Competition in Ideas," at 3 p.m.
today, in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
* * *
Sociedad Hispanica..*.
Sociedad Hispanica will hold a
meeting at 8 p.m. today in the
West Conference Room of the
Rackham Building.
Roberto Gordillq, Fabio Gomez
and Pedro Sacio Arriz will lead
an informal discussion.
Group singing will be conducted
by a group from the Casa Es-
panola.
* *
Progressives .. .
Chairman James Terrell will de-
liver a report on the Progressive
Party convention at a regular
meeting of the Wallace Progres-
sives at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the
Union.
There will also be a discussion
of the recent indictment of the 12
American Communist lea ders
charged with advocating over-
throw of the Government and
plans will be laid for the rest of
the semester, according to Hanny
Leitson, publicity director.
Larger NROTC
The University Naval ROTC
unit will increase the size of its
fall freshman class probably from
50 to 150 students, according to
Capt. Homer B. Wheeler, profes-
sor of naval sciences, and two ad-
ditional instructors will probably
be hired to accommodate the en-
larged class.

HIT 'EM AGAIN!
Pint-Sized Livewvires Lead
MerryChase at 'U' Nursery

By JIM BROWN
The big question every morning
at the University's Nursery School,
located in the University High
School building, is who will wear
out first-the teachers or the kids?
Every morning, promptly at 8:30
sixteen little livewires are met at
the school door by their teachers
to begin the morning's chase. To
say' that they're active is a gross
understatement-they never stop.
Daily Routine
Their daily routine starts with a
careful physical examination, af-
ter which they begin a program of
directed play-directed as :long as
the two teachers can keep up with
them.
Aside from sundry physical ac-
tivities, such as running around
in little circles, their favorite oc-
cupation is to play with water
paints, according to Elizabeth Al-
den, one of the teachers. She adds
that the reason for the preference
is probably because it is a messier
activity than they can find at
home.
On bright days the children play
in the inner court of the high
school building. Here they have
their choice of swings, slides,
sandboxes, or again, just running
around.
Although the little girls are us-
ually able to carry on more intri-

cate activities because of their
more rapid physiological develop-
ment, one teacher believes that
even at that early age, the boys
are noisier.
Chatter Boxes
As we watched them at play it
was hard to distinguish any dif-
ference-it seemed as if they all
talked continually. One little fel-
low in particular took great de-
light in playing haunted castle. He
spent the better part of an hour
howling like a ghost into the ears
of his playmates, completely ob-
livious to the admonitions of his
teachers.
When it is necessary to disci-
pline the children, a method of
isolation is employed, according to
Miss Alden. The offender is sent
off by himself and usually he is
so anxious to get back in the fun
that he repents immediately. Aside
from one little boy who took a
fiendish delight in trying to club
his playmates over the head when
the teacher wasn't looking, we saw
very little need of discipline.
Notes
Ats11:30, when it is time to go
home, the children are *met by
their parents at the school doqr.
Often they have notes pinned on
them by their teachers and they
are tremendously proud of these
notes. One little girl screamed,
"pin it on me again," when her
mother took it off.
The nursery school is part of the
University's plan to give education
students a chance to observe ac-
tual teaching practices in action.
It also acts as a laboratory to
study the educational growth of
children. The age limit runs from
three to four and one half years
and there is always a long waiting
list of parents who wish to enroll
their children in the school.
New Mens' Dorm
Construction of a new $1,200,000
men's residence hall accommodat-
ing 252 Michigan State Normal
College students will begin in 60
days, President Eugene B. Elliott
announced in Ypsilanti yesterday.
The new dormitory has been ap-
proved by the State Board of Edu-
cation. It will be of stone and
brick construction and will have
five stories.
Guild Tea
Roger Williams Guild will hold
its final tea, 4:30 p.m. today, ir
the Guild garden.

to roresters
Classes To Be Held
In CampRoth Sept.
The University's forestry school
will offer practical instruction in
the use of aerial photography at
Camp Filbert Roth, in the Uppert
Peninsula, Sept. 5-11.
Many Requests
Offered for the first time in
1947, the course is being repeated
because of many requests. Appli-
cations for admission should be
sent to John Carow, director,
Camp Filbert Roth, Beechwood,
The University's forestry camp is
on the west shore of Golden Lake,
just off U.S, 2, 15 miles west of
Iron River.
Carow and Frank Murphy, both
of the forestry and conservation
school, will be instructors for the
course. They emphasize that the
course is designed to acquaint the
practicing woodsman with the
technique essential for using aerial
photographs in his work. The
class will be limited to 20 stu-
dents. ,
Experience Wanted
"Well qualified men without
college training need not hesitate
to enroll for the course," Carow
said. "Any person who has had
some good combination of consid-
erable cruising and mapping expe-
riences, surveying, knowledge of
timber types and logging, will de-
rive a great deal of benefit from
the course if they have a personal
interest, aptitude and willingness
to work."
The students will learn by doing
during the one week of intensive
training with no time spent on
difficult theory or mathematics.
Each student will be provided with
the necessary photo interpretation
equipment and will work with a
set of aerial photos of adjacent
forest land which will be checked
on the ground.
Sneezers Advised
'To Escape Pollen
Hay fever sufferers were ad-
vised yesterday by Dr. John M.
Sheldon, head of the University
Hospital Allergy Clinic, to travel
away from the source of irritation
for best relief.
Dr. Sheldon said the 200 drugs
in present use are only partial
aids to hay fever victims and that
many people experience unpleas-
ant reactions from injections. He
advised Michigan sufferers who
can travel to spend the hay fever
season above the Muskegon-Bay
City line.

FOR THE BEST
IN BO KS
rBUY RTy
FOLLETT'
} State Street at North University

'V
A

ATTENTION -
SAGINAW VALLEY
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS!
Important I see you at 4 P.M. today at the Art Print
Exhibit Preview, Alumni Memorial Hall.

t, I

-MIKE CHURCH

I

qV

A Cool Place To Dine on Fine Food!
LANTERN GARDEN
American and Chinese Dishes
1AIR-CONDITIONED
Quick Service --- Plate Luncheons
CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN TO TAKE OUT
Reasonable Prices

II

DAILY.,..
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

n nA

A.. -,

:f-.
SAM4UEL ogaYN
-fnand surprises! s:
Gives you another hit that's fAnDs"".
CARY . RE-TTA D EI
GRANy'YO
with GYS LSA E
JAMESN .COOPER LANC ESTER
u ipl OllEY 'GLEASON 'COER K~E
ard hEWUCIEL O0R "Directed by NI from th
dEMITCHELL BOYCHr a dLeonardoBercovctu es n -
Robert E.Sher dthrougohaRKO Radio-r
Sce en Pay by tNathan Rl- se -rog
Novel..:.:.b-r

(continued from Page 2)
All students and members of the
faculty are invited.
Dance Recital by Tula, and
Julie Wilson of primitive, modern
and Mexican Indian dances at
Barbour Gymnasium Dance Stu-
dio on Wed., July 28 at 8 p.m.
Square Dancing Class, spon-
sored by the Graduate Outing
Club, Wed., July 28, 8 p.m., Wom-
en's Athletic Bldg. Lounge. Small
fee. Everyone welcome.
The last of the Roger Williams
Guild teas for the summer session
will be held in the Guild garden
from 4:30 to 6:00, with a special
celebration.

F
i
r
1
l
t
1

Qualify for the job ahead during
leisure evening hours. Secre-
tarial, accounting, business, re-
view coures. Sessions Tuesdays
and Thursd1ays. Get tree Bul-
ietin.
HAMILTON COLLEGE
William at State Ph. 7831

I

Located
613 E. Liberty,
by Michigan Theatre

Phone
6380

Open Every
Day, Except
Monday

1,

_ - -

Read ... and Use Daily Classified Ads

I.

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Don't Miss It Gals-Our
MONTH -END SALE

k4'ndeqful
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AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT

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Gabardines, Palm Beach and
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Values To $29.95

WOOL SUITS
$25.00 to $39.95
Nice for Fall-Navy, black, brown, green or blue
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Values To $55.00

Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. -'
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Closed Mondays 202 SOUTH

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THAYER

300 DRESSES ... $8.95 to $19.95
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STAGE COACH INN
A.A. STEAKS - SEA FOOD - FRIED CHICKEN
PARTIES - BANQUETS - RECEPTIONS
For Reservations, Call 6004 - 503 E. Huron St.
GRANADA CAFE
Good Food Is Good Health - Open for Your Convenience
Daily 7:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
Sundays 11:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
313 South State
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41

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1

SUMMER SKIRTS

BLOUSES
Qbo An -... QM nn

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II I I INi I r nw _

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