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July 24, 1948 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

orrespondent Nussbaum,.
)oubts New Spain Revolt

There will be no second civil war
in Franco Spain, David Nuss-
baum, former LIFE and PM cor-
respondent, told The Daily yes-
terday.
"The terrible loss of life nine
years ago left a sour taste in the
mouths of the Spanish," Nuss-
baum said, on the basis of three
and a half months inside Spain
recently.
"Another reason is that the
Spanish underground Alliance has
no arms or any way of getting
any.
Unrest, Slowdown
Present guerilla and under-1
ground plans call for intensifying
unrest and continuance of a "two
year old slow-down" in Spanish
industry, hoping for the govern-
ment to collapse by itself, he said.
"Warfare in Spain is as intense
today as the fighting in Greece
before the government threw in
most of the army to quell the dis-
turbances," he said.
Bombing in Madrid averages
five explosions per month, accord-
ing to Nussbaum.
Troops Moved Out
The Spanish Army does not
fight the guerillas because Franco
doesn't trust the military. Instead,
his troops are removed from
"hot" areas and the clean-up is
.done by the Civil Guard, a Castil-

ian version of the German SS, he
stated.
Nussbaum called the Franco re-
gime a "Lost Weegend-a nine
year orgy of corruption and graft."
"Spain is teetring on the brink of
total destruction," he said.
"Franco is just a little boy sit-
ting on a keg of dynamite--the
clash between the east and west-
hoping it will go off. He is wait-
ing for war and a chance to
emerge on a white charger as the
savior of the West," Nussbaum
commented.
The Results
From his tour of Spain and se-
cret conferences with under-
groundcofficials, Nussbaum cited
the results of "Franco suppres-
sion."
The cost of living has risen
1,000 per cent in nine years while
wages rose 50 to 75 per cent, he
said. Although the Spanish gov-
ernment does not release figures
on unemployment, Nussbaum said
that in one day alone in Madrid,
police rounded up 2,300 beggars
that didn't have licenses. He didn't
know how many other beggars had
conformed to the licensing regula-
tions and had not been arrested.
"People get no meat because it
all goes to the black market de-
spite rationing. Olive oil, of which
Spain has a plentiful supply, costs
$2 to $4 on the black market."

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continu;'d from Page 2)
Ross and Emil Raab, violinists,
Bernard Milofsky, violist, Oliver
Edel, cellist, and John Kollen, pi-
anist, at 8:00 Monday evening,
July 26, in the Rackham Lecture
Hall. The program will include
Beethoven's Trio in E-flat major,
Op. 70, No. 2, Quartet in F major,
'Op. 135 by the same composer,
and American Serenade by Leron
Robertson. Since it is being
broadcast the public is requested
to be seated before 8:00.
Events Today
The Roger Williams Guild will
meet at the Guild House, Sat., 2
p.m., for picnic and swim at Por-
tage Lake. Transportation fur-
nished. Those unable to leave
early will meet at the Guild House
at 5:30 to go out for the evening.
Coming Events
Sociedad Hispanica. The Con-
versation Groups of the Sociedad
Hispanica will meet as usual at 4
p.m. at the "Casa Espanola" Tues.,
the League Cafeteria Wed., and
the International Center Thurs.
All those who wish to practice
speaking Spanish informally are
urged to attend.
Anvets Leader
Asks Preparation
BENTON HARBOR, Mich.,
July 23-(P)--Fred S. Markle, De-
troit attorney and vice-comman-
der of the AMVETS, called upon
the United States to prepare to
protect the world against inter-
national criminals.
Markle spoke to the members of
the AMVETS auxiliary meeting
here today for the third annual
convention of Michigan AMVETS.
Arthur J. Madar, of Detroit,
state commander, indicated that
the AMVETS will probably go on
record in favor of the Taft-Hart-
ley - Wagner - Ellender Houing
Bill.
Highlight of the three-day con-
vention will come at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday when Gov. Kim Sigler will
address some 400 Amvets who have
registered for the sessions.
ROYAL PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
IN STOCK
Foreign Language Keyboards
Also Available
GUARANTEED
REPAIR WORK
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 So. Fourth Ph. 2-1213

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, July
23-UP)-The Yugoslav Communist
Party Congress today heard an
appeal for the party and the
Cominform to settle their differ-
ences and unite against "Anglo-
American war mongers."
Bozidar Maslaric, president of
the all-Slav committee, told the
delegates the Yugoslav-Comin-
form split was "working to the
benefit of the enemy bloc."
"The question is how to get out
of this situation," Maslaric con-
tinued. "All progressive and dem-
ocratic nations (the Communist
bloc) are united against imperial-
ists and warmongers on the prin-
ciple of national equality and not
on the principle of mixing in in-
ternal affairs of others. The Dem-
ocratic people demand that their
leaders arrive at agreement and
unitein the struggle against the
Anglo-American war-mongers."
As have all other speakers at the
fifth party congress, now in its
third day, Maslaric gave forceful
support to Premier Marshal Tito
who he declared is pursuing the
true Marxist-Leninist way. The
Yugoslav party, he said, is not try-

Yugoslav Communist Group
Urged To Unite Against Allies
'00a i

ing to establish a so-called "Tito-
ism" but on the contrary has been
supporting Premier Stalin.
Summer U' Ban
Appears Tuesday
The University of Michigan
Summer Session Band, under the
direction of William D. Revelli,
will present its annual concert at
8 p.m. Tuesday in Hill Audito-
rium.
The band consists of 104 men
and women, students and teachers
from 26 states, who are studying
here this summer. Most of them
are conductors of high school and
college bands throughout the
country.
Erik Leidzen, composer and ar-
ranger, will appear as guest con-
ductor in his arrangements, of
two of his own copositions,
"Doxology" and "March, E.F.G."
The balance of the program will
include works by Shostakovitch,
Bach, Haydn, Khachaturian,
Holst, Prokofiev, Gould, Ippolitov-
Ivanov, Rolland, and Grundman.

4

TOP U.S. COMMUNISTS AFTER ARRAIGNMENT-Six of the 12 Communist party leaders in
America under indictment on charges of advocating overthrow of the U.S. Government leave Fed-
eral Court in New York. Left to right: William Z. Foster, head of Communist Party in the U.S.;
Jacob Stachel, education secretary; Henry Winston, organizational secretary; Benjamin Davis,
New York City councilman; Eugene Dennis, general secretary; and John B. Williamson, trades
union secretary.

1
t
,J

-f7

Hili;

l

Movies Take
Smith_ Story
Former 'U' Official
Sells Old Tall Tale
A twenty-five year old tall tale,
"The Sprightly Adventure of In-
structor Simpson" is finally pay-
ing off for baseball enthusiast
Shirley W. Smith, University vice
president emeritus.
Twentieth-Century Fox recent-
ly purchased the aging manu-
script about an instructor who
rises to the rank of associate pro-
fessor after discovering and using
effectively a potion which makes
it impossible for the horsehide of
a baseball to come in contact with
wood while in the air.
Of course, movie magnates in-
formed Smith that Valentine
Davies (author of "The Miracle
of 34th St."), who is adapting the
story will add the inevitable "ro-
mantic angle."
The short story was originally
contrived for the benefit of the
University Club. After telling it,
the audience urged Smith to have
it published. He lost interest after
two rejection slips.
Then in 1946, a desperate Mich-
igan Alumnus Quarterly Review
editor told Smith the woes of not
having enough manuscript to fill
the next edition. Movie-writerI
Davies found it there and negoti-
ations began.
Smith, who now serves as aI
City Councilman, declined to re-i
veal the sum he received for the
story.

I

The Congregational Disciples
Guild will hold an oriental party
at 6 p.m. tonight to raise money
for aid to Christian education in
Japan, particularly for books and
clothing.
Japanese food will be served at
the dinner. This will be followed
by the Guild's version of the "Mi-
kado," directed by Dorothy Dice.
The party will be held in the Me-.
morial Christian Church.
*- * *
Gabriel Faure's Requiem will be
performed at 8 p.m. tomorrow in
the First Presbyterian Church.
This is a music school production.
The Summer School Choir will
sing under the direction of Helen
Hosmer. Soloists will be Eleanor
Peke, soprano, and Howard Street,
baritone. Mary McCall Stubbins
is the organist.
* * *
Dr. E. M. Wylie will preach at
10:45 a.m. tomorrow in. the First
Presbyterian Church. His topic
will be "Gospel of Integrity." At
5 p.m. the Westminster Guild will
discuss "What is Christianity?"
* * *
Roger Williams Guild will hold
a picnic today at Portage Lake.
Students will meet at the Guild
House at 2 p.m. Another truck
will leave at 5:30 p.m.
* *
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will hear the Rev. Leonard
Verduin of the Students Evangel-
ical Chapel in Ann Arbor at their
Sunday afternoon meeting (4:30
p.m., Lane Hall). Mr. Verduin will
speak on "Strangers and Pil-
grims."
The Wesleyan Guild will con-
tinue its discussion series, "Chris-
tianity Tested," at 5:30 p.m. Sun-
On rural roads,
pull entirely .J
offf pavementt
to parkI
--i

day. They will discuss how to solve
difficult personal problems on the
basis of Christianity.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel has
announced a picnic lunch at Port-
age Lake tomorrow. Members of
Gamma Delta will meet at the
Student Center at 2 p.m. for the
outing. The Gamma Delta Chap-
ter of Michigan State College was
invited to attend the picnic by the
University's chapter.
The Zion Lutheran Church will
hold a student talent program to-
morrow in its parish hall. Enter-
tainment will include singing and
recitations.
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion's Bible Study Class will meet
at 9 a.m. tomorrow in the Stu-
dent Center.
Local Draft Board Set Up
A tentative four-man draft
board for Washtenaw County has
been set up, subject of the ap-
proval of President Truman.
With Mayor William E. Brown,
Jr., as temporary chairman, the
board is composed of Prof. Harold
Dorr, of the political science de-
partment, Robert Norris of Ann
Arbor, and John Rane, of Whit-
more Lake.
All served on the board during
World War IL

_ i

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Going Traveling?

Carry Traveler's Checks and take no risk. Good

anywhere.

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101 SOUTH MAIN 330 SOUTH STAT
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

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Jill

VETS CHECKS

I

III

All You
POTENTIAL ADVERTISERS

Checks are being held at the
Ann Arbor Post Office fqr the
following veterans:
Joseph S. Bichler, Harold A.
Bissell, Haskell R. Coplin, Rudolph
C. Hefli, Roland P. Lussier, Edwin
E. Middleton, Donald H. Parkes,
Otto Lee Ricker, John Willliam
Thomson, Corwin G. Van Derveer
and Warren E. Wiessinger.
The above checks will be re-
turned to Columbus, O., on July
31 if not called for.
To Open School
PALERMO, Sicily, July 23-(/P)
-The Franklin D. Roosevelt home
for training Italian wor orphans
in maritime trades will be opened
formally tomorrow.

/4

The Michigan Daily

is

YOUR SALESMAN
to more than
20,000 PEOPLE

The Annual
FALL SUPPLEMENT
can be your introduction to a
1, $6,000,000 A YEAR MARKET,

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AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 to 7:00 P.M.
Sundays, 12 Noon to 3 P.M.
Closed Mondays - 202 SOUTH THAYER
SAGE COACH INN
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For Reservations, Call 6004 - 503 E. Huron St.
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Good Food Is Good Health - Open for Your Convenience
Daily 7:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
Sundays 11:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
313 South State
THE PARROT

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH'
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study Class. Continuation
of study of Sermon on the Mount.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon, "A
Friendly Universe," by Rev. Loucks.
6:00-8:00 P.M.-Guild program. Vesper Serv-
ice in the Arboretum, meeting at the
Guild House.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Reverend Leonard A. Parr, D. D.
Student Ministry-Reverend H. L. Pick-
erill.
Director of Music-Mr. Wayne Dunlap.
Organist, Kenneth W. Jewell.
10:45 A.M.-Service of Public Worship. Dr.
Parr's subject will be "The Hidden Glory
of the Clay."
2:00 P.M.-Student Guild will have their
annual summer reunion at the Fresh Air
Camp. Games, Supper and Vespers.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
10:00 A.M.-Bible Class, preceded by break-
fast at 9:40.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Service, sermon by the
pastor, "Grace-Faith-Saved."
2:30 P.M.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, will meet at the Center to go to
Portage Lake for a swim and picnic supper.
Phone 5560 for reservations.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH-
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
11:00 A.M.--Service of Worship. Rev. Edward
H. Redman preaching on "The End of
Time."
6:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group. Snacks
followed by discussion of "South African
Political Situation."

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
8:30-9:00 A.M.-Breakfast at the Center.
9:00-10:00 A.M.-Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.-Worship Services- in Zion and
Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.--L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall. Supper at 6:00 and Student Talent
Program following.
Wednesday, 4:00-5:30 P.M.--Tea and Coffee
Hour at the Center.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D.. Minister
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.--Morning Worship. Sermon by
Dr. Edmutd M. Wylie, "The Gospel of
Integrity."
5:00 P.M.-Summer Guild meets in the So-
cial Hall. Discussion on "What Is Christi-
anity?" led by Dr. Wylie. Refreshments
follow.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to Congregation
Mr. Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 A.M.-Morning Worship. Nursery
children during the service.

'R

for

GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work.
9:40 A.M.-Bible Study Class.
2:00 P.M.I-The Student Guild will leave the
Guild House for the Fresh Air Camp for
the Summer Reunion. There will be swim-
ming, boating, games, picnic supper and a
lakeside Vesper Service. In case of rain,
call 5838.
STUDENTS EVANGELICAL CHAPEL
Meeting at Lane Hall,
Corner, State and Washington
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Minister
10:00 A.M.---Morning Worship. "The Heroes
of Faith-Abraham."
7:30 P.M-Evening Worship. "The Heroes
of Faith-Moses."

:4,

If The Advertising Deadline is August 3rd! ii III

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