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June 25, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDA,

Emilie V. Wiggins, of Cincin-
nati, Ohio, has received the Mar-
garet Mann scholarship in Library
Science recently from the Depart-
ment of Library Science.
The award, which carries a sti-
pend of $75, was given to Miss
Wiggins-in recognition of her out-
standing work as a student and
her professional promise in libra-
rianship.
For the past two years Miss
Wiggins has held an appointment
on the staff of the general library
of the University of Michigan.
She received her Bachelor of Arts
degree in Library Science at the
June commencements.
Before coming to Ann Arbor in
1945 she was on the Library staff
of the University of Cincinnati.
The Margaret Mann scholar-
ship was established by the alum-
ni of the Department of Library
Science in 1938 in honor of Asso-
ciate Professor Margaret Mann
who retired from the teaching
profession in 1938.
Vets' Checks
At Post O ice
Subsistence checks are being
held until June 28 at the Ann
Arbor post office for the following
veterans:
Allen Bobroff, Betty C. M. Hof-,
meister, Hugh F. Mayr and Walter
P. Meyers.
Checks for the following vet-
erans will be returned on June
30: Gilbert A. Goodwin, Donald
W. Shapiro, Thomas E. Wheat
and Leonard A. Zelek.
Checks for James J. Jamieson,
David H. Larson and Hewett A.
Schoonover are at the post office
as well and will be returned to the
disbursing offices on June 30.
Will Give AVC Report
A first-hand report on the re-
tional convention of the AVC will
be given at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Union when the campus chapter
of the organization holds its first
meeting of the summer session.

"OF MICE AND MEN"-The
movie version of the Steinbeck
drama will be shown here as the
first of the season's Art Cinema
League's films.
Cinema Group
Will Present
Five Movies
Four foreign films and one
American re-issue will be offered
this summer by the Art Cinema
League.
"Of Mice and Men," John Stein-
beck's noted drama, will be pre-
sented at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow and
Friday at Hill Auditorium.
The film will star Betty Field,
Burgess Meridith an(d Lon Chan-
ey, Jr.
Two Russian films, "The Stone
Flower" and "Ivan the Terrible,"
will also be presented during the
season. The Stone Flower, made
in color by a secret process will
short, "Life at the Zoo," a psycho-
logical study of animal behavior-
ism.
"Jericho," a French film depict-
ing the French underground re-
sistance during the war and "Cap-
tain Tempest," an Italian adven-
ture picture complete the list of
the summer's films.
Tickets may be purchased at the
Hill Auditorium box office.
All foreign films will be provid-
ed with English sub-titles.

IT~

Speech Camp
Opens on New
Suimer Site
Clinic LoeIed on
Grand Traverse Bay
A record high of 80 boys helped
open the 16th season of Shady
Trails, summer speech improve-
ment camp operated in coopera-
tion with the University speech
clinic, Monday at its new site on
Grand Traverse Bay.
An entirely new camp, two miles
distant from the former location
at Northport and complete with
cabins, infirmary and athletic fa-
cilities, is now ready for occu-
pancy. The new camp was made
campers, staff members and
friends of Shady Trails and re-
quired 18 months to complete.
Started with Four Campers'
Since 1932, when Director John
M. Clancy founded Shady Trails,
the non-profit organization has
grown from four campers and a
single speech correctionist to its
present high of 80 campers and 12
correctionists. Seven of the cor-
rectionists this year arehgraduates
or speech students of the Univer -
sity and have been trained in the
University speech clinic.
Inwork and play throughout
every waking hour, instruction is
given to overcome speech impedi-
ments. Staff members constantly
accompany their assigned groups,
helping to form new speech pat-
terns in formal and informal sit-
uations. After scientific diagnoses
and private counseling have ironed
out the worst problems, the camp-
ers are ready to participate in
public speaking and dramatic
skits.
Surprising Progress Made
Within the eight-week period,
definite and often surprising
progress is made. Boys whose con-
versation consisted on one syllable
and those to whom telephones
were a terror are soon shouting
on the ball field like the most
articulate of Dodger fans.
Though not claiming to work
complete cures, Clancy can point
to abundant evidence that stam-
mering, embarrassing youths can
attain confidence in their speech,
greatly enhancing their chances
for normal, happy lives.
Boner Brings
Consternation
A University office was thrown
into consternation on the first
lay of classes this week.
Striding into the office with a
determined air, a student calmly
and firmly announced, "I want
a locker to put my bones in."
With thoughts of everything
from homicide to housing short-
ages, the office staff asked for
elucidation. It turned out that
the student was enrolled in an
anatomy class.
He was directed to the cashier's
office with a deep sigh of relief
from the entire office staff.
Elect Watson to
Head Foresters
The University Foresters Alum-
ni Association has announced the
election of new officers.
Russell Watson, of Manistique,
is the new president; Elwood L.
Demmon, of St. Paul, Minn., vice-
president; Prof. Willet F. Rams-
dell, of the forestry college, was
re-elected secretary-treasurer.
Frank Morrill, of Worcester,

Mass.; Wallace W. Weber, of Mad-
ison, Wis.; and Robert Ohlman, of
Chicago, Ill.; were elected to the
board of directors.

American efforts toward the es-
tablishment of an International
Trade Organization represent this
country's first definite post-war
attempt to formulate a world pol-
icy for international trade, ac-
cording to Prof. Charles F. Remer,
of the economics department.
At the first preparatory meeting
of the proposed ITO held in Lon-
don last year, American delegates
submitted a "Suggested Charter
for an International Trade Or-
ganization". "This charter, which
was used as basis for discussion in
drafting a charter for the new or-
ganization, provides for an execu-
tive board and for committees on
commercial policy, restrictive bus-
iness practices ("cartel") regula-
tion and international commodi-
ties agreements.
The most significant change in
the suggested charter, was made
at the insistence of countries

PROF. REMER SAYS:
First Post-War International
Trade Policy Fixed by U.S.

whose economic development has
not reached the point where full
employment of resources is pos-
sible,".rof. Remer said.
They succeeded in having added
to the charter a chapter on eco-
nomic development, recognizing
its importance, planning for it,I
enumera!ang means of develop-
ment and admitting the right of
governments to use protective
measures in development,
The conference currently tak-
ing place in Geneva is not only
a preparatory meeting to lay the
groundwork for a meeting this
fall but it also a conference of
countries engaged in negotiating
reciprocal trade agreements with
the United States.

Law Student
Wins Essay
Contest Award
Mrs. Ann Fagan Ginger, '47L,
has been awarded the third prize
in the Decalogue Society of Law-
yr's 1946-4'7 ay contest held
iuong law students in the United
I'Ie subject of the prize-winning
essay was "With Due Regard for
the Constitutional Guarantee of
Freedom of Expression, What Can
Be Done To Protect the Commu-
nity from Tension and Violence
Arising from Defamation or Abus-
es of Its Minority Groups Such As
Negroes, Catholics and Jews?"
The Decalogue Society is an
organization of 1,400 lawyers of
the Jewish Faith.

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