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July 13, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SUNDAY, JULY 13, 1547

160TH ANNWERSARY:
Northwest Ordinance Paved
Way for Michigan Statehood'

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Campus Highlights

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

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160 years ago tomorrow, July 14,
1787, the Continental Congress
passed the Northwest Ordinance.
At the time less than 5,000 peo-
ple inhabited the region affected
by the ordinance. Later the
states of Michigan, Wisconsin,
Alunmus Pens
Pr~ze 0
Pizewinner
Rowland Barber's
Book Wins $1,000
A $1,000 prize has been award-
ed Rowland 0. Barber, '40, for
his book, "John 29," submitted in
the United Services Book Contest.
Sponsored by Thomas Y. Crow-
ell, Columbia Pictures, and George
B. Harrap Co. of London, the con-
test sought literary talent among
those who served in the armed
forces of the United Nations be-
tween Sept. 1, 1939, and June 30,
1946. One of two American win-
ners, Barber had served in Europe
as a staff officer on the Carpet-
bagger Project, a group commit-
ted to OSS for flying relief to the
European underground.
Barber, who has written a ser-
ies of articles and two novels since
the war ended, recently joined the
taff of Franklin Spier Advertis-
ing Agency. Before working as
a free-lance newspaper and mag-
azine writer in Santa Fe, N.M.,
and writing for radio programs in
New York, he had won a $150 min-

Ohio, Indiana and Illinois were
carved out of this territory, now
containing a total of 26,600,000
people.
Copy of Ordinance Here
The Clements Library has one
of the few copies of the first print-
ing of the ordinance. The doc-
ument has added value because
it was signed by the secretary of
the Congress, Charles Thomson.
Before the passage of the ordi-
nance the territory had been
completely lawless. The ordin-
ance provided for the organiza-
tion of the section and prepared
the way for eventual statehood.
Third Article
According to Robert B. Brown,
curator of printed books at the
Clements library, the third article
of the ordinance is the most fam-
ous. It contains this sentence
which is the motto inscribed on
the front of Angell Hall. "Relig-
ion, morality, and knowledge be-
ing necessary to good government
and the happiness of all mankind,
schools and the means of educa-
tion shall forever be encouraged."
Daniel Webster stated of the
ordinance "I doubt whether any
one given law of any lawgiver, an-
cient or modern, has produced ef-
fects more distinct, marked, and
lasting character than the Ordi-
nance of 1787."
%eeeives Appointment

Russian Skits ...
Skits by students of Russian
and a talk on Russian art will be
featured at a meeting of the
Russian Circle at 8 p.m. tomor-
row in the International Center.
Pi Lambda Theta
Pi Lambda Theta will have its
initiation and reception at 7:30

Phi Delta Kappa ...
Phi Delta Kappa will hold aj
supper meeting at 6:30 p.in to-
morrow in the Union.
Violin Recital .. .
Morrette Rider, music school
student, will present a violin re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Rackhamn Assembly Hall;

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Publication in The Daily Offica
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
meibrs of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten' form to the office of the
Summer Session, Room 1213 Angell
Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day pre-
ceding publication (11:06 a.m.. Sat-
urdays).
SUNDAY, JULY 13, 1947
VOL. LVII, No. 13S

p.m. tomorrow in the West Con-
ference Room of the Rackhlam
Building. Prof. Bennett Weaver of the
English department will speak on
(,uil dpicnic . . . "The Values by which We Live" at
the Lutheran Student Association
T h e Congregational-Disciples meeting at 5:30 p.m. today in the
Guild will meet at 4:30 p.m. to- Zion Lutheran Parish Hall.
day at the guild house for a pic-
nic at Riverside Park with child- P
ren from The Michigan Children's Pro ."
Institute.-

I

1;t: ",': : ,i_ 5 w ; :::.kk, :. .....
Acolytes Meet .,,
Prof. Morris Weitz of the
philosophy department at Vas-
sar College will speak on "Form
and Content, Representation,
and the Expressive in Art," at
a meeting of the Acolytes at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the West
eceives a beaded belt for him- Lecture Room of the Rack-
iter), a Comanche of Apache, ham Building.
American Indian Exposition, The lecture is open to the
public.
Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds!

Will Give Talk
Prof. Karl Polyani, author and
member of the Columbia Univer-
sity faculty, will speak on "Our
Market Mentality" at 4:10 p.m.
tomorrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Speaking under the joint spon-
sorship of the economics and so-
ciology departments, Prof. Poly -
ani will discuss the inadequacy
of running an industrial society
on primarily economic motives.
Prof. Polyani is the author' of
"The G r ea t Transformation"
which deals with the problem of
individualism and collectivism.

Notices
The Scholarship Division of the
Offie of Student Affairs is now
locatted in Room 205, University
Hall, telephone extension 688.
This office administers the Re-
gents-Alumni Scholarships and
the general undergraduate schol-
arships of the University. It will
be informed on all scholarships
of the University and welcomes
referrals on scholarship questions.
Mr. Ivan W. Parker is in charge
of our office; Mrs. Eloise Wilkin-
son is secretary.
E. A. Walter
Inaccordance with the directive
of the Deputy Administrator for
Veterans' Affairs, Veterans Ad-
ministration Branch Office No. 6,
Columbus, Ohio, the local Veter-
ans Administration Office is to
conduct a survey of all veterans
in training at the University and
schools in this area who are re-
porting non-receipt of subsistence
due them prior to June 3, 1 7.
(Continued on Page 4)

Yu

PRESIDENT RECEIVES INDIAN GIFTS-President Truman (left) r
self, and beaded necklace for Mrs. Truman from AlLert Attacknie (cen
Okla., and Robert Goombi of Mountain View, Okla., president of the
during their White House visit.
BUT NO SAUCERS:
Unusual Minerals on Exhibit

Stephen C. Datsko, who r
ed his masters degree from
University in 1946, has beet
pointed to the faculty of St.I
cis College in Loretto Pa.

eceiv-
n the
n ap-
Fran-

or Hopwood award in drama.
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An unusual collection of gems
and meteorites as well as more
_ "prosaic" minerals, which dates
from 1838, is housed in the Uni-
versity's Natural Science Build-
ing.
More than 150 different stones
which have been used by man for

LEWIS-KINGSBLOOD ROYAL

C' WUERTN

HOBSON-GENT LEMAN'S AGREEMENT

COSTAIN-THE MONEYMAN
GUNTHER-INSIDE U.S.A.
GUTHRIE-THE BIG SKY

-I- Prices
25c until 5
30c after 5

p.m.
p.rn.

YERBY-THE VIXENS

TOYNBEE-STUDY OF HISTORY
FREEDMAN-MRS. MIKE

OVREKBOOKSTORE

Today & Monday
Mickey Rooney
in
"LOVE LAUGHS
AT ANDY HARDY"
and
Tom Conway
in
'FALCON'S ADVENTURE'

personal adornment and date
from the cave man era to modern
times are included in the collec-
tion of gems. The earliest stones
used for this purpose were not
valuable gems but pieces of quartz
and brightly colored stones which
caught the eye of prehistoric man.
The more valuable gems are
kept in a University vault and are
used only occasionally for dem-
onstration and instruction purpos-
es. Others, however, form a part
of the permanent public exhibits
of minerals.
Glass replicas of many famous
large diamonds are also included
in the collection. One of these is
a model of the Cullinan diamond
which is about as large as a man's
clenched fist.
The University's collection of
134 meteorites ranging in weight
from a fraction of an ounce to 400
pounds gives scientists a clue to
the nature of heavenly bodies.
The meteorites fall into two prin-
cipal classes, those which are
composed mainly of metal and
those whose structure is principal-
ly stone. The metallic meteorites
are about 95 per cent iron with
a small percentage of metal.
The collections are invaluable
in the teaching of mineralogy ac-
cording to Curator Marion V.
Denny.
Dr. Stob Will
Speak at MCF
Dr. Henry Stob, professor of
philosophy at Calvin College, will
speak on "Christianity-Faith or
Reason?" at the Michigan Christ-
ian Fellowship meeting at 4:30
p.m. today in Lane Hall.
Before joining the Calvin Col-
lege' faculty in 1939, Dr. Stob at-
tended Harvard and the -Free Uni-
versity of Amsterdam. He receiv-
ed his doctorate at the University
of Gottengen in Germany.

1kj

Love-
mad!

HUMPHRky
Kill
m di .:.. aOUGART

BARBARA
STAMCK

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Man- madf

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1216 South University Ave.

Phone 4436

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LOOK AT THESE

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VAL.UES!

for Monday

&

Tuesday

f

NIGEL BRUCE PETER GODFREY
STARtS TODAY!

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Also

"PELICAN PRANKS'"

M

"WELL O ILED"

LATEST WORLD NEWS

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