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July 12, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S, T 1RIDAY, JULY 12, 194'

- THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEME

I _________________________________________ m

I Major League Roundup

By The Associated Press
Little Stubby Overmire saved
the Detroit Tigers' precarious hold
on second place in the American
League yesterday by blanking the
Boston Red Sox, 3-0, after, the
Sox had won the opener of a
doubleheader, 4-3.
The Tiger southpaw subdued
Boston on four singles after De-
troit had yielded the runner-up
position for the time being by
bowing to Tex Hughson in the
opener in a close duel with Diz
Trout.
The New York Yankees' made
the utmost use of the trio of
hits Ellis ]Kinder allowed them
today, and with the aid of some
fancy clutch pitching 'by Allie
Reynolds, they whipped the
luckless St. Louis Browns, 3 to
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York
Detroit
J Boston
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Washington
Chicago
St. Louis

W L
49 26
38 33
39 34
33 33
37 38
33 38
35 42
25 45

Pet.
.653
.535
.534
.500
.493
.465
.455
.357

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
9
9
11%
12
14
15
21 i
GB
3x
3%
5
7
8
131,
15

1, for their tenth straight vic-
tory.
Bouncing back from their no-
hit, no-run loss to Cleveland's
Don Black, the Philadelphia Ath-
letics today snapped the Tribe's
three-game winning streak by
rapping two Cleveland hurlers
for nine hits and a 4-2 victory.
Washington moved into sixth
place in the American League
by trimming the Chicago
White Sox, 4-3, before 2,020
persons last night. Walter Mas-
terson pitched six innings and
yielded four hits to gain- his
seventh victory and the Sena-
tors' third straight triumph of
the series.
Lefty Vic Lombardi of Brooklyn
pitched his first complete game of
the season tonight as he hurled
a four-hit 5-0 shutout victory
over the Chicago Cubs.
Aided by six Boston errors,
Ewell Blackwell gained his 15th
win and his 13th in a row for
the Cincinnati Reds with a 10-
6 triumph over the jittery
Braves. Johnny Sain managed
to stay on even terms with the
buggy whip righthander until
the tribal infield started falling'
apart in the sixth inning.
The New York Giants ambush-
ed the St. Louis Cardinals after
dropping the first game of a
doubleheader today, 4-3, and
pole-axed the World Champions
with six homers in a 17-9 second
game that was' shortened by the
merciful- intervention of darkness
in the eighth inning.,
Billy Cox clouted four safeties
tonight as Ernie Bonham held the
Philadelphia Phillies to -six hits
to give the Pittsburgh Pirates a
7-2 triumph in the third, game of
their series.
THE L. G. BALFOUR
STORE
Your Official Jewelers"
Open every day -
Monday through Friday
1:30 until 5:00
Horne of the Official
University of Michigan ring
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
1319 S. University Ph. 9533

FIRST AID:
hobo Newsom
Ready to Help
Yanks, That Is
CHICAGO, July 11-(P)-Bo-
bo Newsom, the travel-seasoned,
once bombastic right-handed
pitcher, was obtained by the New
York Yankees today and herob-
served that he might help their
pennant chances.
A Yankee club spokesman said
in St. Louis that Newsom had
been obtained on waivers from
the Washington Senators where
he won four and lost six games
this year.
"It's wonderful to be with the
Yankees," Newsom said when in-
formed of the announcement. "I
don't know how I will go but I
think I can help them-not that
they're not a cinch without me."
The Yankees will be the sixth
American League team for which
Bobo has pitched.
Zale, Graziano
Ready for Tiff
CHICAGO, July 11 - toP) -
Champion Tony Zale and chal-
lenger Rocky Graziano did some
carefully - observed breathing,
muscle-flexing and squinting for
the Illinois Athletic Commission
today and then were pronounced
fit as fiddles for their middle-
weight title bout at the Chicago
Stadium next Wednesday night.
It was a study in contrasts as
clean-shaven and somewhat tense
Zale, and Rocky, with a stubby
chin and apparent nonchalance,
submitted to a routine physical
examination by Dr. John J.
Drammis of the State Commis-
sion.
Diamonds
O and
s a Wedding
. nivRings
V717 North University Ave.
- :>o=o- ^-- o- >

MY FEELINGS were mixed when I read that Sammy Gee, the out-
standing Negro athlete from Detroit's Miller High School, had
signed to play with the Dodgers. It's good to see the "color line" in
major league baseball has at last been irrevocably erased. But the
signing of Gee points up another problem which crosses color lines.
Besides being a tine athlete, Gee was an honor student. He
could have had a scholastic scholarship to collc;e prooably, but
when a major league scout pushed that nice fat contract under
his nose, it was, understandably, more than he could resist. But
a baseball career only lasts so long, and players like Detroit's
Dick Wakefield and the Dodgers' Ralph Branca realize this and
go to college during the "off" semester. I hope Gee will think
this over seriously.
IN FOOTBALL, the problem of signing a high school player does not
exist, since college football is the proving ground for the future pro.
The pro football scout waits until a boy has developed in college before
signing him, but college baseball has not yet reached these propor-
tions.
Commissioner "Happy" Chandler, a major league commit-
tee, and a group of college coaches recently tried to solve a sim-
ilar problem. The coaches asked for a rule prohibiting the sign-
ing of a college player until the graduation of his class, unless the
Commissioner granted special permission. The major leagues
would not agree to this, saying they felt the college student was
mature enough to use his own judgement. What they did not
say was that four good baseball years would be subtracted from
each player's career by such a rule. . The problem of the high
school graduate with the mental ability to get a college degree
was untouched.
THE SOLUTION might be to allow the major league clubs to send
a scholastically deserving young player to college, where he could
play on the college team (he can't now if he has signed a contract),
and stay in school as long as he could meet the scholastic require-
ments. In the summer, he could not play professionally, but he could
play on an amateur team.
A responsible group, such as the National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation, would have to draw up specific and rigid scholastic require-
ments and scholarship limits to which all schools in the Association
(which includes most of the better schools in the country) would have
to adhere. This would prevent some college baseball teams from be-
coming mere "major league teams." If you think this is a radical
idea, you ought to get a line on some of the methods of athletic sub-
sidization being practiced by colleges these days.

yASP -ORTSCRI BBLES
By AR.CHIE PARSONS

Ex-M' Captain
Gains in State
Amateur Golf
Ben Smith, '38, Nips
Wolverine Mort Cohn
Port Huron, July 11-(')-A
former University of Michigan
golf captain, Ben Smith, advanced
to the third round of the Michi-
gan Amateur Golf Championships
here today, defeating another cur-
rent Wolverine Morton Cohn, win-
ner of the Trueblood Trophy this
year, in the process.
Smith faces Dick Whiting, a
former Notre Dame links captain,
tomorrow, while Woody Malloy,
another ex-Maize and Blue golf-
er who hails from Ann Arbor,
meets Forrest Groenleer of Sag-
inaw in his third round battle.
Wolverine Ed Schalon, newly-
elected .captain of the 1948 team,
decided not to play, while his
teammate, Rog Kessler, withdrew
suffering from a cold.
With the defending champion,
Lou Wendrow, a first round upset
victim, the 1947 tournament was
a wide open scramble as 16
of the state's top "play for fun"
shot makers-more than half of
them Detroiters-paraded into the
third round of match play at
Black River Country Club.
Belloise Finishes
Abrams in Fifth
NEW YORK, July ll-(AP)-
Steve Belloise, a belter out of the
Bronx who knows very little else
about the art of scrambling ears
except to toss haymakers, tossed
enough of them tonight to stop
Georgie Abrams in five rounds of
a scheduled ten-round in Madi-
son Square Garden.
In a bout marked entirely by
clouting and confusion, Abrams
was floored once each in the first
and second rounds, and was drop-
ped again in the fifth before Re-
feree Johnny Burns stepped in
and halted the proceedings just
as the bell sounded ending the
fifth.

Shirley Spork of Normal Wis
Women's Collegiate Golf Title

COLUMBUS, O., July 10-(A)--
A 20-year-old Detroit redhead
who refused to let a missed 20-
inch putt disturb her smooth
swing won the 1947 National
Women's Collegiate Golf Champ-]
ionship today.
Shirley Spork, Michigan Norm-]
al sophomore, downed her favored
rival, 19-year-old Grace Lenczyk
of Arnold College, one up on the
18th green at the Ohio State Uni-
versity course. It was an upset
for the Detroit girl who had been
expected to wilt under the pres-
sure from Miss Lenczyk, the 1947
Tam O'Shanter Champion.
Miss Spork came through aft-
er losing both the 13th and 14th
'Old-Timers'
Lead Golfers
TOLEDO, O., July l1-(P)-_
The 10th Inverness Four-Ball
Matches settled down to a two-
team race at the end of three of
the seven best-ball rounds today,
with defending champions Ben
Hogan and Jimmy Demaret fir-
ing a pair of 62 totals to take a
one-point lead.
The defending kings, two of the
nation's veteran campaigners and
top money winners, failed how-
ever to shake off the sensational
sophomore pair of Ed Furgol of
Pontiac, the 28-year-old with the
withered left arm, and George
Schoux, 27-year-old from San
Francisco.
A nine-hole edge in two
matches today gave the champ-
ions a "plus 11" under the unique
scoring system.

holes and going one down. Sport-
ing a one-up margin on the 13th
tee, she laid an iron .shot on the
green below the pin. Miss Len-
czyk went down in the regulation
three and Shirley was only about
20 inches from the pin withther
her first putt. She missed that
little second putt, however, and
took a four.
Still upset, she lost the 14th
to Miss Lenczyk and the gallery
whispered the Detroit red-head
was through. But she got down
on the 400-yard 15th in par while
her opponent hooked into a fence
and wasted a stroke getting out.
The two girls, playing steady de-
liberate golf, halved the 16th in
one-over-regulation five.
The break came on the 180-
yard 17th. Miss Lenczyk hooked
her tee shot into a trap while
Shirley was down the center and
on the green. The Connecticut
girl made a brilliant shot out of
the sand within six feet of the
cup, but her putt looked into the
hole and ducked away. Shirley
was down in three, and when they
halved the 18th, she was the
champ.
For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Try
MILLER'S
Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-Made Rolls
and Individual Pies
Call 2-7171
We Deliver
Anywhere, Anytime

Brooklyn
Boston
New York
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia.
Pittsburgh

W L Pet.
45 31 .592
41 33 .554
39 32 .549
39 36 .520
39 39 .500
36 39 .480
32 45 .416
29 45 .392

Correction!
For STOLL BICYCLE
& MOTOR SALES.
Their correct address is
424 SOUTH MAIN
NOT...
424 South State

41
11* * -* * * * * * * * *

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

____ _ _ .. _ m_ _ . .
I

(Continued from Page 2)
p.m. in Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall, 309 East Washington Street.
Supper will be served at 6:00 and
the program will follow. Prof.
Bennett Weaver of the University
of Michigan will be the speaker.
Bible Study Class will be held at
the Center, 1304 Hill St., at 9:15
a.m. Worship services in Zion
and Trinity Lutheran Churches
will take place at 10:30 a.m.
First Baptist Church
512 East Huron--C. H. Loucks,
Pastor & Student Counselor,
Guild House-502 East Huron
(7332)

10:00-Church School for all
ages. Student Class Discusses the
"23rd Psalm" iri the Guild House.
11:00 - Church Worship. Ser-
mon-"The Lord's Prayer". Nur-
sery for small children.
6-8 Baptist Student Guild. "Ad-
ventures in Inter-racial Friend-
ship" will be presented by the
Good Will Team of the Michigan
Council of Churches. A cost
supper will be served in the gar-
den.
First Congregational Church
10:45 a.m.-Dr. Parr's subject
is: "The Great Business of Life."
4:30 p.m. Student Guild picnic
(Continued on Page 4)

SPECIAL
STUDENT
RATES

R s.
Yo
ASTN AnuDOR

3ANK
. by. .
MAIL'
i me-saving,
Step-saving,
oney-saving,
nd especially
nvenient for
hat summer

t

TIME
MAGAZINE
1 YEAR 4.50
LIFE
MAGAZINE
1 YEAR 4.25

I

I

trip.

i

BANK
SOUTH STATE

LUTHERAN STUDENT
1304 Hill Street-Henry
For National Lutheran

ASSOCIATION
0. Yoder, Pastor
Council Students

9:15 A.M.:. Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches.
11:00 A.M.:CWorship Service in Christ Luth-
eran Chapel, Willow Run.
5:30 P.M.: Meet in Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall, 309 E. Washington. Prof. Bennett
Weaver, speaker.
4:00 P.M.: Wednesday - Tea and Coffee
Hour at the Center.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D., Minister
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr's sub-
ject will be "The Great Business of Life."
4:30 P.M.: Congit~gational-Disciples Student
dent Guild will meet at the Guild House,
then go to Riverside Park for a picnic sup-
per and out-door worship service.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and Robert
H. Jongeward
,Music: Lester McCoy, guest choir director
Irene Applin Boice, associate organist
Student Activities: Kathleen M. Davis,
director
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon, "Love
Worth Four Cents." Rev. Jongeward.
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild. Supper. Prof.
Wesley H. Maurer will speak on "Sky-
scraper Religion,"-Part of Summer Com-
munity Workshop.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Church School for all ages. Stu-
dentGClass discusses the "23rd Psalm" in
the Guild House.
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon, "The
Lord's Prayer." Nursery for small children.
6-8 P.M.: Baptist Student Guild. "Adven-
utres in Inter-racial Friendship" will be
presented by the, Good Will Team of the
Michigan Council of Churches. A cost
supper will be served in the garden.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Mis-
souri, Ohio, and Other States)
11:00 A.M.: Service, with Holy Communion.
Sermon by the pastor, "Enlightened Zeal."
5:15 P.M.: Supper meeting of Gamma Del-
ta, Lutheran Student Club. Guest speak-
er: "The Rev. Kurt Voss, missionary in
China the past seven years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., and James Van Pernis,
Ministers
-Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
Ruth Kirk, Church Worker
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship Sermon by Dr,
Lemon, "The Promises We Live By."
5:00 P.M.: Summer Program in the Social
Hall. Prof. H. Y. McClusky will speak on
"As the World Looks to an Educator."
Supper will be served at the Council Ring
out-of-doors at 6 p.m.

+ Classified Advertising

+

101 SOUTH MAIN

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

I

ROOMS FOR RENT
SUMMER AND FALL rooms for men.
Singles, doubles. Two blocks from
campus. 1346 Geddes. Immediately
available. )37
FOR SALE
BABY PARRAKEETS. $4, $6, can learn
to talk and whistle. Canaries, bird
supplies3and cages. 562 S. Seventh.
Phone 5330. ) 66
'37 TERRAPLANE, $250 cash. Phone
27096. )19
PUREBRED Doberman Pinscher pup-
pies 8 weeks old. 8433 Fosdick Road,
2 miles west of Ypsilanti State Hos-
pital. ) 12
FOR SALE-Special value, white ox-
ford shirts. Button down collar, $3.0{)
All sizes, call 8768.
WITE PALM BEACH suit. Size 38.
In good condition. Call 8702 after
6:00 p.m. )33
MISCELLANEOUS
ALTERATIONS, custom-made clothes,
remodeling of clothes. Prompt serv-
ice. Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4666.
SEE! August issue of Ebony Magazine.
Especially law students. Copies:
Gencial Library: Rackham study
hall. ) 35
WANTED
WOULD LIKE to exchange two good
seats for Thursday night's perform-
ance of Arsenic and Old Lace for
any two seats Friday night. Call
2-8488. )13
WANTED-15 more men for board. Psi
Upsilon, 1000 Hill Street, phone 6490.
)25
QUALIFIED TUTOR for Physics. Call
WGrant, 2-1297. )31
WANTED TO RENT

HELP WANTED

330

BABY SITTERS with references.
7253 1-or information 6 to 9 p.m.

Call

SUBSCRIBE NOW
AT

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Small brown leather purse on
Willow village bus Thursday eve-
ning. Reward. Phone 2-2501, ext.
31. , )34
LOST: Small address book, on June
27, in Union cafeteria. Finder please
call 8030. 544 So. 1st St. )36

FOLLEtTS
State at N. University

I

I

Popcorn Pete Says:
Approved social events for the coming week-end (our
apologies to the Daily Official Bulletin) : "walky-
talky" dates with a sack of popcorn.
CARMEL CORN SHOP

TOO&~
f~c
s

INTERDENOMINATIONAL
CHURCH SERVICE
West'Court, Willow Village
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon topic,
"When the Going Is Hard." Nursery and
Primary Church School held during same
hour as church service.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Diyision at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. John M. Shufelt, Curate
The Rev. John H. Burt, Student Chaplain
Miss Maxine J. Westphal,
Counsellor for Women Students
Mr. George R. Hunsche,
Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M.: Nursery and Kindergarten, Tat-
lock Hall.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by Dr.
Lewis.
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club picnic and dis-
cussion led by the Rev. Henry Lewis at
Kennedy home, 3595 Geddes Road. Those
desiring to swim may meet at the Student
Center, 408 Lawrence St., at 4 p.m. Trans-
portation provided from the Student
Center at 4 and at 5 p.m.
Wednesday, 7:15 a.m. Holy Communion (fol-
lnweri hv breakfast at Student Center.

621 E. Liberty St.

Phone 5975

21 Steps from State St.

i

--- __ _ ._ . .1

i'i'/ ' -ate

'f"h

I

i T

3-4 ROOM apartment, furnished or un-
furnished for medical student and
wife. Sept. 1 or sooner. Call Te-
cumseh 311 collect. )2
GRADUATE teaching fellow desires
room for fall term. Please contact
Richte;, 514 Forest Avenue, 2-7128.
)18
2-3 ROOM apartment wanted now or
in fall for veteran graduate student
and wife. No smoking, drinking,

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS,
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
COTTAGE I N N
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.
Closed Saturdays 512 East William

Whether the shortest route to good fish-
ing leads along pavod highway, graveled
road, country lane, over the meadow, or
thru the woods-your sturdy, dependable
Servi-Cycle will get you there and back
home again, surely and safely. Ends
worries about personal transportation
for recreation trips ... Servi-Cycle meets
every safety requirement of the Inter-
national Powercycle Association as to
weight, speed, lights,
and brakes... See Model

1. 0Icluded

14

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to Congregation

H on display. Ready for
delivery NOW. Ask for
demonstration.

Fed'(eral Tax I

11

I

I

II I

T eDAklArA f'AC

i

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.. ",1

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