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July 10, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-10

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THE MICHIGAN IAILY

Sigler Delays
Rent Control
Nppointments
Wants 'BestQualified'
For Local Committees
LANSING, July 9-(JP)-A delay
f several days in the appoint-
nent of local rent control commit-
ees in order to get "the best qual-
fled representatives" was fore-
ast today by Governor Sigler.
"I intend to recommend the ap-
ointment of advisory committees
n the 12 Michigan rent control
,reas just as soon as possible,"
rid Sigler. "It probably will take
ome time to work out these ap-
ointments. I want to get the
est. qualified representatives of
,he tenant and the landlord plus
rnpartial members of the public
,t large to serve on these boards."
Sigler declared landlords should
et a fair return for their invest-
nent. At the same time, he said,
enants should be protected from
skyrocketing rent increases. The
governor said the rent control
oards should be' able to make rec-
mmendations which would have
, sound foundation in fact.
[rish Culture
Pattern Traced
Prof. Myles Dillon Celtic schol-
,r at the University of Chicago,
peaking last night on the arch-
,ic character of Irish tradition,
leclared that Ireland's strange
eatures "are the result of surviv-
I1 and not borrowing from sub-
tratum of earlier people."
His address was delivered be-
ore the fourth public forum of
he Linguistic Institute, at Rack-
am Building.
"Ireland, on the margin of the
he Indo-Europeanarea," Prof.
)illon said, "has preserved arch-
ic features which have been lost
lsewhere in areas nearer the
enter."
"We must," he said,-"allow for
decreasing rate of change in
mguage and culture as wve go
ickward in time, in the same
ashion as the anthropologists

UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR RETURNS-Dr. Arthur S. Aiton, pro-
fessor of history at the University, and Mrs. Aiton, arrive in New
York, July 2 aboard the Grace Line Santa Rosa enroute to Ann
Arbor. Dr. Aiton has been lecturing on the role of the United
States in the history of the Americas at the Universidad de An-
tioquia, Medellin, Colombia; and the Universidad de Cartagena in
Colombia under the auspices of the Colombian Cultural Center at
Bogota.
NORMAL VISION:
University Students Read Six
Hours Without Fatigue Signs

SPECIAL
STUDENT
RATES

TIME-'
MAGAZINE
1 YEAR 4.50
LIFE
MAGAZINE
1 YEAR 4.25

Recent experiments show that
high school and college students
can read for six hours at a time
without evidences of fatigue ac-
cording to Dr. Walter F. Dear-
born of Harvard University.
Dr. Dearborn, who spoke here
yesterday on "Reading and Visual
Fatigue" discussed experiments
that have been carried on to de-
termine the length of time stu-
dents can read wihout strain.
Groups of high school and col-
lege students were asked to read
books of easy and difficult read-
ing and microfilm reproductions,
he said. Results of the experi-
Vets' Checks
A t Post Office
Checks are being held a the
Ann Arbor Post Office for the fol-
lowing veterans: William C. Gor-
do, Robert M. Lowry, Allen J.
Niebgr.
These checks will be returned to
Columbus July 11.
The Main Ann Arbor Post Of-
fice is holding checks which will
be returned to Columbus July 17
for the following veterans:
Stanford H. Abramovits, David
J. Adams, George Adomian, Har-
vey C. Allison, Charles M. All-
mand, William H. Allison, John P.
Allred, Jr., Edward Arakelian,
William A. Anderson, Frank R.
Arams, Frederick A. Aseltine, Ed-
ward H. Atkins, Charles H. Bag-
ans, George L. Balestri, Orville C.
Barton, Jr., Earl 0. Bates, Harris
F. Beeman, Elwood H. Ball, Duane
Bird, Richard C. Beckett, Charles
B. Benjamin, Ramon M. Block, Ira
Alexander Brede III, Charles F.
Brown.
Additional names of veteran's
for whom the Post Office is hold-
ing checks will be printed tomor-
row.

ment indicate that students with
normal or well corrected vision
can read a book of ordinary dif-
ficulty or a "dry" book for six
hours, and under none too com-
fortable conditions, he said.
Dr. Dearborn explained that
tests to indicate fatigue were made
before and after the reading ses-
sions. The main evidence was
secured through the continuous
electrical recording of eye move-
ments during the entire reading
periods. This was done by means
of light-weight electrodes which
picked up the electrical currents
generated when the eyes moved.
These electrical changes were am-
plified and recorded on tape, in-
dicatingc hanges in the func-
tioning of the eyes resulting from
prolonged reading, he said
Dr. Dearborn used a colored
moving picture film showing the
technique used to illustrate his
lecture.
' Radio Guild
Will Audition
Tonight and tomorrow night
the first auditions for the new
University of Michigan Radio
Guild will be held at 7:30 p.m. in
room 4006 Angell Hall.
The Guild, organized under the
auspices of the University Broad-
casting Service is an all-campus
organization for students interest-
ed in radio. This summer it will
presen a weekly ,series of drama-
tized children's programs.
The Guild will be under the
supervision of Prof. Waldo Ab-
bott, director of the broadcasting
service and associate professor of
speech, and Robert Bouwsma,
program director of the broad-
casting service
Eggertson To Speak
"The Problem of Religion in
Our Public Schools," will be dis-
cussed by Prof. Claude Eggertson
of the education school at 4:05
p.m. today in the University High
School auditorium.

Smith Reports
Teachers Need
Health Work
Michigan teacher training in
public health covers too little that
involves experience, Julian Smith,
chief of the state department's.
public instructors' experimental
division of health and recreation
declared yesterday
Speaking at the three day con-
ference on the health of the
school child, Smith declared that
teachers needed to be taught
more of the aspects of "health-
ful living" while they are being
trained so that "when they talk
about health to their pupils they
will know better what they are
talking about."
In an earlier talk, Mrs. Mar-
jorie Cosgrove, home and living
counsellor in the Highland Park
public schools, said that male
high school seniors are mature
enough to study child care.
"It's good to see a student come
out of a nursery class pretty well
worn out," she said. It will teach
him, among other things, that
when he is a husband and a fath-
er not to come home from work
and ask his wife what she has
been doing all day."
Such teaching has been going
on in the Highland Park High
School for the past five years.
Mr. Congrove revealed. Girls
were compelled to take the course
and boys could take it if they
wished. "At first they were bash-
ful about taking it, but now al-
most all of them sign up."
Mrs. Cosgrove declared that
such training was "worth while"
adding that in one of her classes
last year she had a veteran who
was the father of a six weeks old
child.-
War Surplus
Will Be Sold
At Self rid ge
Articles ranging from a sal-
vaged Plymouth sedan to a 3000
pournd capacity platform scale
will be sold to highest bidders at
a surplus property sale July 14
through 18 at Selfridge Field, near
Mt. Clemens.
Army officials announced that
the War Department property
will be displayed daily from 9:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the base. Sealed
bids will be taken. Successful
bidders will be announced at 2
p.m. July 21 and buyers may re-
move their purchases the same
day.
Other articles to be offered in
the coming sale include one large
air compressor, nuts, bolts, screws,
tools, assorted ladders, steel and
wood filing cabinets, office desks,
chairs and tables, flying clothes,
helmets, goggles aircraft parts.
radio accessories, tires, tubes, and
and trunk lockers.
Any person may bid except War
Department and Army Personnel
The property is on exhibit at the
Small Lots Warehouse, building
723, on the main road at Selfridge
Field.
Chorus Requires
Sopranos, Altos
Sopranos and altos are urgent-
ly needed by the University Chor-
us, Miss M. H. Muldowney, di-
rector of the chorus said yester-
day.
"We have plenty of men, but
there is still a lack of women's

voices", she said.
Students from all departments,
as well as the music school, are
eligible to join the chorus which
meets at 3 p.m. daily in Haven
Hall
Two concerts are planned for
the summer, Miss Muldowney
said, adding that the group will
sing both modern and classical
music.

JEANETTE GRANDSTAFF-
Abby Brewster, one of the kind-
hearted Brewster sisters whose
benevolence runs to gentle hom-
icide in Joseph Kesselring's
"Arsenic and Old Lace", will
be played by Jeanette Grand-
staff. The play will open at 8
p.m. today at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Mixer PlatRnifed
For Graduates
Social Will Be Held
Saturday at Rackham
A graduate mixer, first in a
series of social events planned by
the Graduate Student Council,
will be held at 8:30 p.m. Satur-
day in Rackham Assembly Hall,
Leo Lutwak, social chairman, an-
nounced.
Featuring dancing on the
Rackham terrace, the mixer will
also include bridge and refresh-
ments.
The mixer is the "opening gun"
in a series of graduate social
events, which will later include
more mixers and a picnic in con-
junction with the Graduate Out-
in Club. It will conclude with
the annual semi-formal Graduate
Ball, Lutwak said.
Other activities planned this
summer by the Graduate Student
Council include compiling of a
comprehensive guide to the grad-
uate school and departments of
interest to the graduate student,
he added.
The Graduate Student Coun-
cil, representative body of the
graduate students on campus, will
continue to meet informally
through the summer session.
League Bridge Night
The League will sponsor an
evening of duplicate bridge at
7:30 p.m. today.

(Colitilitted from Page 2)

ly. informal
10, at 4:30
persons are
attend,

Thursday Tea. July
p.m. All interested
cordially invited to

A Square Dancing Class, spon-
sored by the Graduate Outing
Club, will be held Thursday July
10(.h at 7:45 p.m. in the Lounge of
the Women's Athletic Building.
Everyone welcome. A small fee
will be charged.
There will he a secial meeting
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity to
complete plans for the Summer
Session on Thursday. ,July 10, at
7:00 p.m. at the Union.
The French Club will hold its
third meeting on Thursday, July
10, at 8p m. in the second floor
Terrace Room of the Michigan
Union. There will be games,
group singing of modern French
songs and refreshments. All stu-
dents interested are cordially in-
vited.
I n t e r n a t i o na I Center: The
eekly. informal Thursday Teas
will continue in the Int erna tional
Center during the Summer Ses-
sion. Teas will start promptly at
4 :30 *pin. Language tables will
convene.
Coming EVents
Delta Kappa Gamma, honorary
education society, will hold a pic-
nic at North Lake on Friday, July
11. All members who are on the
campus this summer are invited
to attend. Transportation will be
provided. Reservations should be
given to Miss Sarita Davis, Uni-
versity Elementary School, phone
1121, Extension 360, or 5382, by
Wednesday, July 9.
The Art Cinema League pre-
sents "The Stone Flower" in new
Russian Dialogue. Also Soviet
newsreel and short subject "Life
color process. English titles;
at the .Zoo," a study in animal
behaviorism. Thurs., Fri., 8:30
p.m. Box Office opens 3 p.m.
daily. Tickets phone 4121, Ext.
475. Hih Auditorium.
The third Fresh Air Camp Clin-
ic will be held on Friday, July 11,
1947. Discussions begin at 8 p.m.
in the Main Lodge of the. Fresh
Air Camp located on Patterson
Lake. Any University students
interested in problems of indi-
vidual and group therapy are in-
vited to attend. The discussant

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN

SCEmiAnnual
CLEARANCE SALE

Rcgular
$42.50
35.00
25.00
18.00
17.95
15.00
7.95
16.50
2.25

All Wool Covert Topcoats
All Wool Covert Topcoats
All Wool Sport Coats .
All Wool Sport Coats .
Corduroy Sport Coats
Tropical Worsted Slacks .
Rayon Slacks . . . . . . .
Zelon Raincoats . . . . .
and 2.00 Colored T-Shirts

Sale
. . $36.50
. . . 29.95
... 19.95
. .12.50
.. . 15.00
. . . . . . 12.95
, , , , , 6.50
. .r, ,r12.50
. .. 1.69

,r

will be Dr. Howard M. Burkett,
Neuropsychiatric Department of
the University Hospital.
The Graduate Outing Club will
meet for outdoor activities on
Sunday July 13th at 2:30 p.m. at
the Northwest Entrance of the
Rackhamn Building. P1ease sign
up before noon on Saturday at
the check desk in the Rackham
Building.
A Graduate Student Mixer will
be held on the third floor ter-
race of the Rackham Building-
inside if weather is inclement-
on Saturday July 12, 8:30 to 12.
Dancing, bridge, and refresh-
ments. Nominal fee .
Dr. Yuen-li Liang will hold the
first of four conferences on the
United Nations, Tuesday, 'July 15,
3:10 p.m., East Conference Room,
Rackham Building. These con-
ferences are part of the Summer
Lecture Series, "The United
States in World Affairs."
Dr. Robin Humphreys will hold
the first of four conferences on
Latin America, Wednesday, July

16. at 4:10 p.m., East Conference
Room, Rackham Building. These
conferences are part of the Sum-
mer Lecture. Series, "The United
States in World Affairs."
Professor Gottfried S. Delatour
will hold the first of four confer-
ences on European affairs, Thurs-
day, July 17, at 3:10 p.m., East
Conference Room, R a c k h a m
Building. These conferences are
part of the Summer Lecture Ser-
ies, "The United States in World
Affairs."
Visitor's night will be held at
the Observatory Friday, July 11,
beginning at 8:30 p.m. Jupiter
and star clusters will be shown.
If the evening is cloudy or nearly
cloudy, the Observatory will not
be open. Children must be ac-
companied by adults.
International Center: The
weekly Friday evening movies will
be resumed this Friday, July 11,
in the International Center.
"America: Land of Liberty" will
be shown, starting at 8 p.m. The
public is cordially invited to at-
tend.

SPECIAL

All Boxer Swim Trunks..
All Straw Hats . . .
All Lounging Robes . .
All Short Sleeved Sport Shirts .

1/3 off
1/3Off
/ off
. . .20% off

t

mIlElZ TOGGERY
521 EAST LIBERTY -Michigan Theatre Bldg.

a

SUBSCRIBE NOW
AT

FOLLETTS
State at.N. University

,[
,r
4.

I

PERSONALLY RECOMMENDED
FINE iECOfDINGS
NOW IN STOCK
BACH: BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS
Busch Chamber Players
Vol. 1 MM 249 .. . . . . .. . . . .$92
Vol. 2 MM 250........................$7.35
BRAHMS: SONATA NO. 3 IN D MINOR
Szigeti, Violin and Petra, Piano
M M 324 .......... . .. ............ . $4.20

SUMMER
CLEARANCE SALE

CHOPIN: SCHERZOS
Artur Rubinstein, Pianist
DM 189 ............ .........
HANDEL: WATER MUSIC
Ormandy and Philadelphia Orchestra
Xx 279 .... ........
MAHLER: SYMPHONY NO. 4
Walter and New York Philharmonic
MM 589 ..

.$5.08
$3.15
$7.35

.. t t w
l r t

of
cotton dresses
and
seersucker suits
designed
for your fun
this summer.

..

Many complete operas, e.g. Aida, Tosca, La Boheme,
Carmen, Faust, and others are now again available.
'We cordially invite you to come in and browse.

/off

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