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July 02, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-HOPEFUL FUTURE:
Edmonson Sees More Fundls
To Improve Public Education

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ii
a a

More funds for the support of
public education with a resulting
increase in additional facilities
are probable in the coming years
according to Dean J. B. Edmon-
son of the education school.
Dean Edmonson spoke on the
topic "What Is Ahead in Educa-
lFaculty. . .
(Continued from Page 1)
ing Mechanics); Maurice J. Sin-
nott (Chem.-Met. Eng.);' Cedomir
M. Sliepcevich (Chem.-Met. Eng.);
Matthew Van Winkle (Chem.-Met.
Eng.); and Jesse L. York (Chem.-
Met. Eng.)
Medical school -- William H.
Beirwalters, M.D. (Internal Medi-
cine); Reynold L. Haas, M.D. (Ob-
L. finerman,G M.D (Pathlog1y);
Muriel C. Meyers, M.D. (Internal
Medicine); Frederick E. Shideman
(Pharmacology); and Chris.J. D.
Zarafonetis, M.D. (Internal Med-
icine).
Forestry school --Louis A. Pa-
tronsky (Wood Technology).
Music school-Theodore E. Heg-
er (Music Literature); and Russell
S. Howland (Woodwind Instru-
Architecture school-Grover Dee
ole (Modeling and CDe ramics);
Public health school-Otto K.
Egelke, M.D. (Public Health

tion" Monday at a lecture for
graduate students in education.
Predicts Changes
He predicted changes which
"though not revolutionary in char-
acter" would bring improvement
to the educational system. Many
of these changes will involve
bringing the school in closer con-
tact with community needs. Prob-
lems such as poverty, housing,
sanitation and health will have a
greater part in the instructional
program he said. The schools will
attempt to provide a more exten-
sive program of guidance for all
youth, including those out of
school and to make programs of
vocational training more general-
ly available. More effective con-
sideration of the educational needs
of minority groups will also be
given in the future he believes.
Dean Edmonson emphasized the
importance of vigorous efforts to
modify the attitudes and condi-
tions that h a v e handicapped
American education. A program
of information for the public to
acquaint it with the aims and pur -
poses of education and to combat
the feeling that it is an excessive
drain on the national income is
necessary, he said.
Weakness of System
Other failings of the education-
al system which Dean Edmonson
di s c u ss e d iclude overcrowdd
teachers, the disadvantage voca-
tional instruction hashigen paed
tige claimed for academic subjects
and the internal disagreements
among various groups within the
system.
Educational workers must face
the responsibility for capitalizing
on the possible bright prospects
for schools and at the same time
work to eliminate weakness Dean
Edmonson said.
The Student Directory
THE L. G. BALFOUR
- STORE
Your Official Jewelers"
Open every day -
Mnay through riday
1:30 until 5:00
Home of the Official
Unwversity of Michigan ring
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
1319 S. University Ph. 9533

Yuen Ren Chao
Explains 'Alh'
Of Language
How thc Chinese use interjec-
tions such as "oh" and "ah" was
explained yesterday by Prof. Yuen
Ren Chao, of the Academia Sinica
in Nanking, at the second Ling-
uistic Institute luncheon confer-
ence.
Thie problem of giving interjec-
tions and emotional pitch tunes to
utterances in Chinese is especially
difficult, because it is a language
which makes a pitch tune an in-
tegral part of every word, Prof.
Chao explained.
One of the means by which
Chinese solve the problem, in
addition to extra-grammatical de-
vices, is by treating interjections
with special and invariant tones
which are different from those of
more regular words. Thus, Prof.
Chao said, many Chinese inter-
jections have a special rising tone
in all dialects, whereas the tones
of other more regular words are
subject to dialect variation.
Emphasis on particular words in
the sentence is secured, Prof. Chao
declared, by increasing the range
of the tones of words. As in-
dividual words are emphasized, the
tone patterns are stretched so that
the low tones are lower and the
high tones higher.
A final device described by Prof.
Chao consists of adding a suffix
of a special nature, such as an ex-
tra falling tone at the end of the
wd, sounding somethilikete
an English period, This is added
is complete, Prof Chao comet
ed, and is used for such things as
expressing satisfaction or approv-
al, or informing the ignorant.
* ~~* '
On Linguistics
A discussion of "The Nature of
Linguistics" will be given in the
second public lecture of the Uni-
versity Linguistics Institute at
7:30 p.m. today.
The speaker, Prof. Martin Joos,
of the University of Wisconsin, is
conducting courses in phonetics at
the Institute this summer.
Dr. Murray B. Emaneau, of the
University of California, will speak
on "The Synchronous Treatment
of Borrowed Words, with Special
Reference to the Anna mese'' at the
Institute's third lecture in the
series at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow.
Prof. Emaneau has been the
ograph son Sanskri and ote
Indian subjects. He is an editor
othe Journal ofanhe sAmerican
publications committee for the
Linguistic Society of America.
The Student Directory
On Sale July 9

MINES ADMINISTRATOR SIGNS NOTICE--Navy Capt. C. H.
Collisson, federal coal mines administrator signs a copy of an or-
dcr announcing the return of soft coal mines to private ownership
after more than a year of government operation. Comndr. E. D.
Doyle, Collission's excutive of fier looks onl. Notice will be dis'
played at the affected mines.
'MIKE' PRACTICE:
By U' Broadcasting Service

For All Around Service

U

I

UNKOGRAPGU$2-.W
Writes a; smoothly as a soft lead
pencil on any quality of paper
wakes answering of cortespond-
ence a pleasure instead of a task.
Unequaled for making carbon
cppies with original in ink.
Dlraws lines to ruler without
$mudge or blot
Suits any hand-loan it freely-
hard pressure cannot bend,
smooth ball-like 14 kt. solid
gold point.
ANN ARBOR'S
BUSY BOOKSTORE

GIFTS OF LASTING BEAUTY!
Come in and see out; newly arrived shipment of beautiful
iported gifts.
imported Buttons.
Delicate Benares cups and saucers.
Beautiful hand-woven straw mats.
And a host of other imported gift items.
ACROSS FROM THE ARCADE - 330 MAYNARD

Diainondsfj
and
s a Wedding -
Rings 11

All University students interest-
ed in radio will have a chance to
gain experience in it this summer
by joining a Radio Guild, which is
to be organized by the University
Broadcasting Service under the
direction of Professor Waldo Ab-
bott, Associate Professor of Speech
and Director of the Broadcasting
Service, and Robert Bouwsma,
Program Director of the Broad-
Durting tei summer the Guild
will present a series of dramatiz-
ed stories for children at 5:45
p.m. each Wednesday over Station
WPAG. The organization will in-
clude those interested in acting in
such plays, in sound effects, ini
narration, and in the writing of
iadio plays.
While th~e immediate project
lies in the field of radio plays for
children, in the future all types of
radio plays will be presented by the
Guild. Students unable to enroll
in the University radio speech
classes will receive microphone ex-
perience a~nd instruction as mem-
bers of the Guild, and those inter-.
sionally will haveO anm opprunt
to try out their efforts over the
University station.
S"Miracle on 34th Street," now
playing at the Roxy Theatre in
|New York, is a film version of the
book by Valentine Davies, who
gauated from the University in
Davies, whose story is dubbed
by Time as "A sure-fire, brightly
cynical bit of whimsy about a man
who thinks he's Santa Claus, and
his effects on Manhattan's retail
Christmas trade," wrote the Un-
ion, opera "Tamborine" in 1925
with Walker G. Everett, Several
ofhi Bpay yhave since appeared
Mrs. Davies, formerly Elizabeth
Strauss, daughter of the late Prof.
Louis Strauss, of the English do-
partmen t, graduated from the
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(contnud -ro Pae2
rector of the Bureau of Psycholog-
ical Services.
hostesses needed for Campus
Cashali dances at the League Fri-
day and Saturday nights. All
Girl interested inbeing hostesses
the Undergraduate Office of the
League, at 4:00 today Wednesday.
If unable to come call Catherine
Tillotson 2-2539.

phone auditions will be
that time. During tho
rehearsals will be held
between 3 pm. and 'ip
times to be arranged,

StAIl ullts Wi
Sell()aISN liI)S
Tlhree forestry students have
wnsholarsip stablished b
the National Association of Furni-
ture Manufacturcirs.
Winners of the a wards are
Charles 0. Swanson of Jamestown.
N.Y., John E. Langwig of Albany,
N.Y. and Harold E. Worth of
Knightstown, Ind.
Enrolled i n t h e "furniture
course", officially designated as
the Wood Technology curriculum,
they are studying to equip them-
selves for careers as administra
the furniture industry. All three
ae marie iveterans whose wivcs
First graduate student here to
receive an NAFM Scholarship,
Swanson has just been awarded
his Bachelor of Science degree in
Wood Technology and now plans
studies leading to a Master of sci-

given at
s ummne].
lMondlys
io. ut in

'The first meetings of the Gi I
will be held Thursday and Friday
evenings, July 10 and 11. at 7:30
in Room 4007 Angell Hall Micro-

Prof. Slosson
Says World Is
Not in Danger
Civilization is not in danger of
extinction at the hands of the
atomic bomb or bacteriological
wvarfare, according to Prof. Pres-
Ion W. Slosson. of the history do-
lpartment-
Speaking on "'As The World
Looks To A Historian" at the First
Pres.byterian Church Sunday, Prof.
Slosson said that because our civ-
ilization is global instead of re-
gional, it would be next to impos-
sible to destroy it with one blow.
Otu last two wars, while in sheer
magnitude the greatest in history,
were not the worst viewed in pro-
portion to population, Prof. Slos-
son emphasized. During the
Thirty Years War. Germany lost
almost half its total population.
"But the human race is a hardy
lot", Prof. Slosson commented.
Te seod inte serie of tak
ional men expressing the view-
points of thcir professions will be
delivered by Dr. Herbert T.
Sc] unale. instructor in psychiatry
at University Hospital. The topic
of his lectu]'c will be '"As The
World Looks To A Psychiatrist,"
Ahiini Attack
Al ta kin ti -desti yn n
sects from the ar is th e .ob o
tWo ex-forestry studenits, John F.
Wear, '41F, and Fred Walker, '41F
('urrently employed with the Bur-
eau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.
Wear is experimenting with
mieti ods of di sting and spraying
over Oregon forests. Flying a bi-
plane of antique vintage, he has
also staged aerial blitzkriegs on
sugar beet aphids arid mosquitoes
in the area.
Walker. who has been working
for more than a year in different
parts ot' the country, is now on
the lookout for new methods of
fighting forest- insects. In the past
he has used aerial spraying and
d usting successfuily against loop-
ers. spruce-bud worms, and other
leaf and bud eaters.
The over-all Army malaria rate
(luring World War II was 19 pci.
thousand per year. Among over-
seas tr'OOls, the iatc was 49 per
thouand pci year
~SUMME R
WEATI-JER 6
SAnd timec for a more exciting,
ltj teriing hair-do. See the
newfeaherfluffs, up-sweeps 0

) todav!
ANN 6
BEAUTY ARBOR
13b5 S. University Ph. 7156

N.
C ~
"4 7
,'---.
N
~"-

Frenche lu rb Talk ***
"L'existentialisme," the recent
literary movement in France, will
be the subject of a talk by Prof.
Albert J. Salvan at the second
meeting of the French Club at 8
p.m. today in the Terrace Room
of the Union.
A social hour of games and
i'efreshments will follow the lec-
ture. The meeting is open to all
students interested in speaking
the French language.
* * *
aLigisltics Lectufre . ..
Linguistic problems for Amer-
icans and Mexicans visiting each
other's countries will be dealt
with by Adrian Leon Marquez
at a meeting of the Spanish
Club at 8 p.m. today in the
East Conference Room of the
Rackham Building'.
Marquez, formerly of the Na-
tional University of Mexico, is
now with the linguistics depart-
ment here. The lecture is open
to the public.
* * *
(;ermalL Picntic . ..
A picnic at Portage Lake July 9
will initiate the informal summer
meetings of the German Club.
Paronize You Sti

swimfling and other outdoor
sports will feature the outings this
summer which will offer German
students an opportunity to prac-
tice the language.
The picnic is open to all stu-
dents. Reservations must be made
before noon Tuesday at 204, Uni-
versity Hall.
* * *
Rugen ToSpeak..
Prof. Mabel E. Rugen of the
Education School will speak on
"School Health Department Re-
lationships for Health Educa-
tion" at 4:05 p.m. tomorrow in
the University High School aud-
itorium.
The lec'ture is open to, the
public.
Education Spcec . . .
Albert K. Stevens of the Exten-
sion Service will speak on "Work-
ers' Education" at a meeting of the
Men's Education Club at 7:15 to-
day in the Union.
Officers for the summer ses-
sion include William Beach, pres-
ident; Philip Proud, vice-presi-
dent; Gerrit Wiegerink, Albert
Hyde, Arthur Lean, Jack Begel-
man and Harold Vroman, mem-
bers of the executive committee.
elit Book Exchange!

Campus Highlights

ri( ..~
'.4
A

4
Al
I

what girl wouldn't feel glamorous
in this tummy-reducing ice blue
satin paneled Vassarette .. .
designed to wear for your cocktail
hours or to do heavy duty
under shorts . ..

ii

A~~~Hlbum SHO UE
.. . FOR SUMMER LISTENING .. .

BUSINESS TRAINING
* Secretarial
Accounting
Ste notypy
Offic Machines
E ffect're Placement Sen ice.
Lxpencc, fredyfcly
Plea ai, clarJOom I/s
NIoen IiUSamahns
Writ or hon egis
Learn how quickly you
Scan qualify for a busi
ness career. No obliga-
Stion.
BUSINESS COLLEGE
William at State Ph, 78A1

7.50
shop early; store
wilbe ced on
July 4th and 5th

OLD AND NEW

FAVOR ITES

from OPERETTA and
BERLIN
MUSIC OF iRVING BERLIN
GERSHWIN
MEMORIAL ALBUM
HERBERT
SWEETH EARTS
MUSIC OF VICTOR HERBERT
. VICTOR HERBERT MELODIES
KERN
MUSIC OF JEROME KERN
SHOW BOAT
ROMBERG .
STUDENT PRINCE
MUSIC OF SIGMUND ROMBERGC

MUSWCAL COMEWY
BLUE SKIES
PORGY ANlD BESS "
RED MILL
BABES IN TOYLAND -
EILEEN
JEROME KERN (Al Goodman)
ROB ERTA
BLOSSOM TIME
iDESERT SONG

c~9

.~.' -~

4

0

(( ((Zf I

/71

THE NINE BAD SHOTS

(

FINIAN'S RAINBOW - BRIGADOON - ANNIE GET YOUR GUN -
CALL ME MISTER - MUSIC OF IRVING BERLIN - COLE PORT ER
AND MANY OTHERS A T THE

And What to Do About Them
By JIM DANTE and LEO DIEGEL,
with Len Elliott
T'his unique book shows that there are nine and
only nine truly bad shots to golf. Once these nine
have been licked, you can take ten or more

SICING.
HOOKING

(4

TOPPING
SMOT HERING

Set off your suntan! Wedt
cushion- platform'd
comfort, style and quality ..
as se en in Gla mour.

PULLING
PUSHING

I

II

1)AI~

II

,

WI I

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