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August 15, 1947 - Image 17

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-08-15

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1947

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I PAGE

Mark Abend Leads 'M' Cie Squad
To National Collegiate Billiards Title

Michigan's sharp-shooting
pocket billiards team edged past
highly-favorednMinnesota and
eight other national contenders
last March to capture the National
Intercollegiate Championship.
The Wolverines amassed 406
points for ten innings of play,
three ahead of the Gophers.
Kentucky was third, followed by
Ohio State, Wisconsin, Utah,
Purdue, Florida, Oklahoma, and
St. Joseph.
The Michigan cuemen gained a
berth in the finals by virtue of a
second-place rank in the New
England and Eastern Section's
opening competition. They chalked
up a better than 80% accuracy
range.
Mark Abend, Detroit billiard
Varsiti ,es Lead
in Scholarship
2.73 Average Tops
All-CampusGrade
A survey of first-semester
grades of University of Michigan
athletes in all sports has revealed
that Track Coach Ken Doherty's
40-man squad turned in a record-
breaking average of 2.73, equiva-
lent to a high "B-minus," which
easily surpassed the over - all
campus average of 2.54 for the
past two semesters.
Two-Miler Hits Four Point
Highest ranking among the
trackmen was John Morrison, a
two-miler, and an engineering
student, who collected 17 hours of
"A" grades. Four of the squad's
top ten ranking classroom stars
were pole vaulters-Charles Laur-
itsen, graduate student; Ed Ulve-
stad and Eugene Moody, engineer-
ing students and Haskell Coplin,
student in the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts.
Other team averages, which in-
cluded only lettermen who were
involved in more competition than
non-lettermen and reserves,
shows that wrestlers had 2.60;
basketball players 2.53; hockey
iplayers 2.52; football players 2.44
and swimmers 2.35.
Fullbacks Lead Gridders
Fullbacks led the football play-
ers with Jack Weisenburger, ed-
ucation, leading with 12 hours of
"A" and six each of "B" and "C."
Dan Dworsky, architecture, with
three "A's," a "B" and a "C" was
second. Bob Wiese with six hours
of "A" and six of "B" also ranked
with the highest in the group as
did End Ed McNeill with eight
hours of "A" and seven of 'B"
and Tackle Bob Ballou with eight
hours of "A" and eight of "B."
In the case of the football squad
Ernest B. McCoy, assistant to the
athletic director, pointed out that
the gridders had made their rec-
ords while going through a full
nine-game season with two-hour
daily practice sessions, plus games
both away and at home.

ace, led the Wolverine outfit. He
was high man with 87 points,
and had a high run of 55. Andy
Paton, also number-one man on
the tennis squad, was on his
Crisler Lands
NCAA Rules
Against Pros
Denies Subsidization
Of Michigan Athletes
"Probably the greatest accom-
plishment of the year" was the
manner in which Athletic Direc-
tor H. O. "Fritz" Crisler's annual
report to the University described
the approval of six resolutions for
the preservation of amateur stan-
dards in inter-collegiate athletics
at a National Collegiate Athletic
Association meeting earlier this
year.
While these resolutions are
merely approved principles, the
report states that it was further
decided at the meeting to make
them part of the constitution,
possibly taking the form of re-
qtuirements for membership in
the NCAA. If such changes are
made, the report continues, "in-
stitutions which fail to support
these principles will be unable to,
schedule games with those that
do."
Crisler's report cited the ath-
letes of this University for their
fine scholastic achievements, and
scotched any speculation about
subsidization of athletes at Mich-
igan.
"Unlike many institutions,"
the report say, "Michigan has
no athletic scholarships. All
scholarships to athletes are a-
warded through duly constitut-
ed University officials in exactly
the same manner, as if they
were not athletes."
On the matter of jobs held by
Michigan athletes, the report
said: "Contrary to general be-
lief, these jobs do not consist of
clock winding and guarding cam-
pus monuments.
"Some are employed in pri-
vate homes and in stores, but the
greater number find employ-
ment as waiters and dishwash-
ers in fraternities, sororities and
restaurants. The compensation
in all instances is in keeping
with services rendered."
Professor Ralph Aigler, the
University's faculty representative
to the Western Conference, said,
in a special statement quoted at
length in Crisler's report that "the
year 1946 marks the initiation of
two signnificant steps . . . (1) the
agreement by our Conference with
the Pacific Coast Conference for
the joint operation of the Rose
Bowl game . . . for a period of
five years and (2) the adoption of
a series of 'Principles' by the
NCAA."

heels with 86. Joe Sobeleski,
guard on the Wolverine eleven,
had 83, Andy Sullivan 82, and
Jim Mummey 68.
The University has received a
gold cup emblematic of the na-
tional crown, which has been
placed on display in the Union.
The trophy is presented by the
Billiards Association of America,
and will be retained by Michigan
until next year's competition.
It is the third time in 12 years
that the Wolverine cuemen have
gained possession of the cup, a
record equalled only by the Uni-
versity of Florida.'
The nation-widebilliardsdcom-
petition was interrupted during
the war but was resumed this
year. Michigan's five-man team
took the premier honors against
a field of 26 other colleges and
universities.
Each college team performs on
its own campus and wires its
scores to the Billiards Association
headquarters. Competition is also
held in straight-rail and three
cushion billiards.

Yost Awards
For Students
OfferedAgain
Granting of Fielding H. Yost
honor awards, discontinued in
1943 because of the war, will be
resumed this year, it was an-
nounced this spring by the Board
of Regents.
The awards go to the students
selected on the basis of'moral
character and good citizenship,
scholastic ability and intellectual
capacity and achievement, physi-
cal ability, vigor and =vitality, and
capacity and promise of leader-
ship and success.
The committee in charge of the
awards was reconstituted to in-
clude the director of the Office
of Student Affairs as chairman,
the Director of Physical Education
and Athletics, the Registrar of
the University and two members
of the University Senate to be
appointed by the Board of Re-
gents on recommendation of the
president.
The two University Senate
members named were Prof. A. E.
R. Boak and Prof. Robert G. Rod-
key.

'M' Swimmers Capture
Nine Ali-A merican Spots
Holiday Wins First Place in Backstroke;
300 YardRelay Sets New World Record

LES REMINISCES:
Michigan Athletics Publicist
Recalls Top Thrill of Career

The University of Michigan
captured nine places on the 1947
All-Americaneswimming team se-
lected by the College Swimming
Coaches of America, while Ohio
State led with 19 places, it was
announced by Coach Charles Mc-
Caffree of Michigan State College.
Harry Holiday, NCAA back-
stroke record-holder and Wol-
verine ace, won first place in his
specialty, the 150-yard back-
stroke, while the Wolverine 300-
yard medley relay, composed of
Dick Weinberg, Bob SohI, and
Holiday ranked first in their
division, writing a new world's
record into the books with a
2:50.5 performance.
They also set a national record
in the 300-meter medley relay,
swimming the distance in 3:15.3
in the National AAU meet in Ty-
ler, Tex.'
Weinberg w a s awarded a
place in the 50 and 100-yard
free style on the basis of his

23.2 and 51.8 performances,+
while Sohl took a spot in the
Z00-yard breaststroke with' a
time. of 2:21.4. Wolverine Gil
Evans won a spot in the one-
meter diving, and he and his
teammate, Alex Canja, won hon-
orable mention in the three
meter board event.
Michigan's Gus Stager won a
place in the 220-yard free style
event, and another one in the 440-
yard free style with 2:11.8 and
4:48 clockings. The last Michigan
place came in the 400-yard free
style, where the Maize and Blue
relay of Holiday, Bill Kogen,
Charlie Moss, and Weinberg cap-
tured the honors.
Coach Mike Peppe's Buckeyes
showed their power by placing in
all 11 events, with Bill Smith
snatching first places in three-
100, 220, and 440-Miller Ander-
son winning both diving events.

In describing his most thrilling
experience of more than 20 years
of newswriting, Les Etter, head
of the publicity department of the
University athletic association,
relates the incident which won the
second of a two-game series be-
tween Michigan and MinnesotaJ
during the 1926 season.
"It was late in that game,"
Etter begins, "that the great All-
American, Bennie Oosterbaan,
whom I have come to know quite
intimately as a Michigan coach in
the last two years picked up a
free ball inside the Michigan 40-
yard line and romped 60-oddl
yards for the score that tied the
ball game."
Biggest Thrill
That play, coupled with the
conversion for goal by the other
member of the Bennie-to-Benny
combination, Benny Friedman,
was the most thrill-packed of his
life, Etter related. "I was a fresh-
man at Minnesota at the time and
was full of the old college spirit.
It was a serious blow to my morale,

for with that play, Michigan wor
the game 7-6," he added.
Ends Fourth Year Here
Etter, who has seen quite a few
thrilling sights duringhis career
as news reporter and publicity
man, is now entering his fourth
year at the University, having
marked his third anniversary here
Aug. 8.
As head of the department
Etter's responsibilities are num-
erous. He sends all Michigar
sports news to more than 60C
newspapers and radio station,
throughout the country. In addi-
tion a five-page monthly summary
of sports events was compiled an
sent during the war to' more than,
150 former 'U' men in the Arme
Forces.
'Lions Sign ThIree
Former Wolverine gridders Pau
White, Bob Weise, and Elmer Ma.
dar have signed contracts to play
for the Detroit Lions this fall
White was traded to Pittsburgh
recently in the deal that bring,
Bill Dudley to the Lions.

...

1-

i

--,.

14

SA'FFELL

&11

BUSH

STATE

STREET

ON CAMP-US

I

\AHETHER OR NOT FATE

OR Wl

YOU AT MICHIGAN WITH ALL ITS

PRESTIGE--THERE IS NO

REASON

'BUM' PRESJDENT:
'M' Alumnus Branch Rickey
OnceCoached Michigan Nine

CAN'T LOOK T HE PART OF A TRADITIONAL
MICHIGAN MAN, AND LOOKING THAT PART HAS
PLACED MANY A MAN IN AN ENVIABLE POSITION.

By GLORIA VREELAND
.If you're one of those "interest-
ing facts picker-uppers" and a
sports fan to boot you'll no doubt
appreciate learning that Branch
Rickey, that superman in the
baseball trading and scouting bus-
iness not only graduated from the
University of Michigan law school
(with honors) but also was head
baseball coach for the Wolverines
for four years.
The current president of those
lovable "Bums" from Brooklyn re-
ceived his law degree in 1911 and
was soon afterwards offered a
professorship at his alma mater,
all of which proves his wizardry
extends beyond his chosen field
of judging and handling baseball
talent.
Discovered Sisler
While piloting the Michigan
diamond outfit from 1910 to 1913
Rickey made one of his first great
discoveries-heconsiders it his
best. In 1912 a young freshman
by the name of George Sister
caused a sensation by tossing

shut-out ball and contributing
some powerful stick work in an
intramural game and in the an-
nual varsity-alumni tilt. Rickey
took the future Hall-of-Fame
first baseman in hand the follow-
ing season.
Calls George Tops
According to Rickey, who is
noted as the greatest connoisseur
of baseball ability, Sisler, was the
greatest natural, all-around base-
ball player who ever lived. He
could do everything-pitch, field,
hit, and catch.
Indirectly Rickey's influence
still exists on the Ferry Field
diamond for it was he who recom-
mended Ray Fisher for the base-
ball coaching post which he has
held here since 1921.
RIDER'S
THE PEN HOSPITAL
"See Doc Rider!"
115 WEST LIBERTY ST.

SAFFELL

UBUSH HAVE BEEN THE

EXCLUS

. v
"44
A

HEADQUARTERS FO
MAN FOR TWENTY

)R THE WELL-DRESSED MICHIGAN

YEARS.

WHEN

"YOU COME TO

MICHIGAN IT'S

SAFFELL

& BUSH FOR THE

BALL & THRASHER
"Everything for the Office"
211 South 4th Ave. - Ph. 2-6503M4
STIID NT IIPPI IiF

PROPERLY

DRESSED

UNIVERSITY MAN.

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II .

I

I

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