100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 06, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-08-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

D ' -;

I _i I,

t~s+ + .. w . - M ta flPVA R! ff1MY- -

k

Hittite Speech
Is Discussed
By Lecturer
Grammatical Ending
Used With Frequency
The Hittite grammatical ending
--za, usually thought to be a re-
flexive pronoun form, greatly in-
creases in frequency in later Hit-
tite and is unparalleled elsewhere
in the grammatical structure,
Prof. E. Adelaide Hahn, first wo-
man president of the Linguistic
Society of America, said yester-
day at the seventh regular lunch-
eon conference of the Linguistic
Institute.
The ending, like the English use
of forms of -elf-as in sentences
like "I did it myself," where it is
only a sort of emphatic or inten-
sive form - cannot always be
translated as a reflexive, Prof.
Hahn said. Hittite, the language
of the ancient Hittite empire of
pre-Biblical times in Asia Minor,
she explained, had remained un-
known until the twentieth century
when the discovery of an exten-
sive series of government records
and other texts, written with
wedge-shaped characters on clay
tablets enabled scholars to study
and translate the language, and
to establish that it is ultimately
related to such modern tongues as
English and French.
Prof. Hahn, who is well known
for her contributions to Hittite,
classical and Indo-European lin-
guistics, holds a chair of Greek
and Latin at Hunter College,
whcre the success of the teaching
of classics has attracted wide no-
tice from educators throughout
the country.
The conference was preceded by
a luncheon for members of the In-
stitute and friends, in the Union.

MusicInstitute,
Meetings Will
BeginToday
Almost 800 music teachers from
the secondary schools and colleges
of Michigan, Indiana and Ohio
and University music school stud-
ents will attend three conferences
here, sponsored by the music
school, today through Friday.
The Conferences are "Bands,
Wind and Percussion Instru-
ments," to be held today; "Teach-
ing of Strings," tomorrow; and
"School Vocal Music," Friday.
Members of the University fac-
ulty participating in the band
conference are Professors William
D. Revelli, William H. Stubbins,
Haskell Sexton, Harold Ferguson,
Albert Luconi and Robert Buggert
all of the music school.
A string trio, composed of Jos-
eph Knitzer, violinist, Oliver Edel,
cellist and Lee Pattison, pianist,
will highlight the string confer-
ence, which will also include a lec-
ture on "Essentials in Strings in
the Teacher-Training Program,"
by Traugott Rohner, of North-
western University.
The conference on School Vocal
Music will feature a series of lec-
tures and a program by the Uni-
versity Summer Session Chorus,
under the direction of Miss Mary
Muldowney.
Student Directory
Summer . Directory sales will
continue through the end of the
summer session at Union and
League desks and at Student Pub-
lications Building at half-price,
50 cents.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

U' Will Hold
Institute Talks
Opening session of the School
Secretaries' Institute, conducted
by the University for public school
and college secretarial personnel,
will be held at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow
in the East Lecture Room of the
Rackham Building.
The morning program will in-
clude discussions by Dean J. B.
Edmonson and Dr. Claude Eggert-
sen, of the education school, and
Otto Haisley, superintendent of
Ann Arbor schools. During the
afternoon members of the Insti-
tute will be taken on a tour of the
campus.
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer will show
his film "Operations Crossroads,"
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the East
Lecture Room. The evening pro-
gram is open to the public.
League Cafeteria
The League Cafeteria will close
at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 15 and reopen
at 7:30 a.m. Sept. 3.
The main dining room will re-
open at noon Sept, 22.

IN SPITE OF WAR:
Decline of Colonialism Seen
As Highlight of 20th Century

By J. M. ROBERTS, JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
Twice within a few days the
the United Nations has been con-
fronted with manifestations of a
great world movement which may
yet stand in history as the trade-
mark of the 20th century-the de-
cline of colonialism-despite two
and possible more general wars.
The Dutch, because world opin-
ion was piling up against them,
and the Indonesians, because they
were in no position to fight, have
adjourned their brief war in fav-
or of continued negotiation. Neith-
er side had a sufficiently tenable
position to embarrass the UN
much.
The Egyptian demand that Brit-
ain be ordered out of Egypt and
the Sudan may be a horse of a
different color.
The Egyptians contend, and the
British have practically admitted
by entering into negotiations, that
the 1936 treaty providing for the

IT CAN'T BE THAT BAD JIMMY-Despite the combined efforts
of a group of circus clowns, little Jimmy Fostor of Chicago, just
couldn't find a thing to laugh at when he attended the opening
performance of a circus in Chicago.
EVIDENCE OMITTED:
Civil Rights Official To Speak
On Retrial of Condemned Gd

presence of British troops for mu-
tual defense has been outmoded.
No unbiased observer can disagree
with the Egyptian contention that
"an alliance of this sort is but an-
other form of subordination."
But there are certain realities
which Britain must consider.
Among them are Suez, the new
British defense line across middle
Africa to which she has been
forced back by the effect of aerial
warfare in the narrow Mediter-
ranean, and the interest of both
Britain and the U.S. in the Mid-
dle East's oil. Sometimes the
blocks of international relations
fall into strange and immoral
patterns, yet they cannot always
be changed arbitrarily without
threatening the necessary as well
as the bad part of the structure.
As in Palestine, Anglo-Ameri-
can fear of Communist influence
among the Moslems is an ever.-
present factor. Just as in the
ancient days of Muscovy, Russia
seeks to move into every weak
spot that develops. The Western
Powers don't want to see any area
left unprotected.
Casbah T o resent
Leap Year Dances
The Casbah is doing its bit to
prepare the campus for leap year
with two Sadie Hawkins dances
to be given from 9 p.m. to mid-
night Friday and Saturday.
Couples and stags may attend.
The only requirement is that ev-
eryone come in jeans or old
clothes. Al Chase and his band
will provide the music.
The dances are being held to
furnish students with pre-exam
relaxation, Catherine Tillotson,
Casbah c h a i r m a n announced.
They mark the official closing of
the Casbah until September 26

Lobby...
(Continued from Page l)
man, of having "sold out to the
real estate lobby."
Brown persuasively presented a
number of arguments against the
Taft housing bill which are in
keeping with the real estate men's
basic aim of "keeping the govern-
ment out of the housing business."
l.) The bill will cost too much.
2.) It extends unsound credit
by authorizing 95 per cent mort-
gages on small homes.
3.) Our economy doesn't need
the expanded credit it provides.
4.) The insurance companies
are opposed to the guaranteed
realty clause which would guaran-
tee them a minimum return in an
effort to stimulate construction.
5.) It gives the federal govern-
ment a blank check to engage in
research.
6.) Private housing can do the
job and do it better.
The effectiveness of these argu-
ments and of the real estate lobby
itself will be tested during the
next session when an election is
in the offing and a large number
of "liberal" groups are lobbying
for the Taft bill on the basis of
the public's need for housing.
II Prices
25c until 5 p.m.
30c after 5'p.m.
Wed, and Thurs.
MERLE OBERON
in
\"TEMPTATION"
and
"BACKLASH"
with JEAN ROGERS

'I

I

+ Classified Advertising + /

I

The retrial of Pvt. Lemas Woods,
jr., who was sentenced to be hang-
ed for the shooting of his tent-
mate on March 23, 1946, will be
discussed by Mrs. Ann Shore, ad-
ministrative secretary of the Civil
Rights Congress, at a meeting of
the Inter-Racial Association, at
7:30 p.m. today in the Union.
The Civil Rights Congress,
which organized the Pvt. Lemas
Woods, jr., Defense Committee,
and UAW attorney Ernest Good-
man, who investigated the case,
were instrumental in securing
President Truman's order that
Woods be granted a new trial on
the ground that the evidence did
not warrent his conviction.
Judged Guilty
Woods, who has been in prison
for more than a year, and in vir-
tual solitary confinement since
April, 1947, when he was returned
to the United States from the
Philippines, was judged guilty of
murder in a three-hour court-
martial, principally on the basis
of a confession he had been forc-
ed to sign. Lt. Robert G. Guenzel,
who conducted the prosecution at
Woods' court-martial, later ques-
tioned the reliability of the evi-
dence leading to conviction. "The
acts of the accused subsequent to
the shooting," he said, "did not in-
dicate a planned murder . . . the
accused was acting as a frightened
man rather than as a calculating
murderer would act."
Despite the fact that the Crim-
inal Investigation Laboratory had
reported that the net covering the
cot of the victim contained holes
with evidences of powder marks
such as a bullet passing through
it would leave, Goodman revealed,
this evidence was omitted at the
court-martial.
Letter to Father
The words " ... sitting here
waiting to be hanged for some-
thing I did not intend to do" in a
letter that Woods managed to
get to his father after the court-

martial, aroused the Civil Rights!
Congress and the UAW attorney.
Woods was cleaning his gun, he
said, when it discharged accident-
ally and killed his tent-mate.
Rev. T. Timberlake, president
of the Baptist Ministers' Confer-
ence, and George F. Addes, Inter-
national Secretary-Treasurer of
the UAW-CIO, are co-chairmen
of the Lemas Woods, jr., Defense
Committee.
Campus
Highlghts
Graduate Mixer...
A mixer for graduate students
will be held at 8:30 p.m. Friday
in Rackham Assembly Hall under
the sponsorship of the Graduate
Student Council, Leo Lutwak,
council social chairman has an-
nounced.
A result of the large response
to a mixer held last month, the
event will again feature dancing,
bridge and refreshments on the
Rackham terrace, he said.
* * *
Piano Recital...
James Mearns, pianist, will
present a recital in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements of
the degree of Master of Music
at 8:30 p.m. today at Rackham
Assembly Hall.
His program will include com-
positions by Mozart, Bach,
Beethoven, Schubert and Cho-
pin.
* * .* *

1115

MISCELLANEOUS
ALTERATIONS, custom-made clothes,
remodeling of clothes. Prompt serv-
ice. Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669.
LEAVING SCHOOL. CALL 6449. We will
help move your baggage and trunks.
Collins Service. )76
FOR SALE
BEAUTIFUL YOUNG PARAKEETS and
Canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
562 South 7th Street, Phone 5330. )93
ARGUS C-3 CAMERA -complete with
case and accessories. Call Ypsi 3596-
J5 or write R. L. Weiss, 1086 Goshen
Court, Willow Run. )98
1939 DESOTO Tudor, Perfect running
condition, $750 cash. 1257 Rutland,
Willow Village, after 5:30 p.m. )57
SIMMONS DAVENPORT-Converts in-
to double bed. Practically new and
in excellent condition. Phone 9785.
)58
WHITE, refrigerator -like ice box.
Holds 75 lbs. $15.00. 313 South 5th
Ave. Tel. 26857. )60
GLOUCESTER Maple bedroom suite,
mahogany coffee table, overstuffed
chairs, maple desk and chair, single
box springs and mattress, maple side
table, maple occasional chair, maple
corner cupboard, Imperial candlewick
glassware. 2301 Pittsfield Blvd.,
Pittsfield Village. )74
37 CHEVROLET coupe. Heater, Sealed
beams. 61,000 miles. Looks and runs
well. 1317 Pontiac. )70
AIR FORCE surplus sun glasses. $2.95.
A4 base lens. Polished ground glass.
The best sun glass buy in the coun-
try. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)69
BEGINNERS Golf clubs. Call between
5-7 p.m. 1446 Washington Height,
Apartment 2. )68
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Small seat foi big person to
west coast leavingivicinity August
15. Telephone P. Eisenhart, 2-2521,
Ext. 434. )48
RIDERS WANTED daily to downtown
Detroit 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. shift.
Phone Bill 8470, )55
DRIVING TO DALLAS, Texas via St.
Louis, Tulsa. Can take 3 riders.
Leaving August 16th. Call 4121, Ext.
308. )59
WANTED-2 passengers to Los Angeles.
Leave afternoon 15 August. Phone
Smith 2-5553,, 4-6 daily. )63
MALE GRADUATE student desires ride
to Miami, Fla. or general vicinity.
Will share expenses and driving.
Willing to leave on or about Aug.
16 or Aug. 23. Call 2-8218. )64
RIDE Washington, D.C. wanted, two
people. Share driving, etc. Leaving
about Aug. 16. Darnell Roaten, 2-
7367. )78
FLORIDA student will share expenses
with driver to Miami or vicinity on
or about August 16. Call Cal Gras-
er 2-6824 or 2-8400. )75
WANTED-A ride to Sault Ste. Marie
around August 15. Please call Jean
Fyfe, Mosher Hall. )71

HELP WANTED
MAGAZINE publisher is seeking secre-
tary who knows shorthand and type-
writing. Also seeking circulation as-
sistant with typing ability. Call
7205 for interview. )62
LADIES-Eearn good income, build
permanent business taking orders
for famous Sheba Ann Frocks. Lat-
est fall creations by America's top
designers-bonus-free portfolio. F.
W. Warrington, 423 Lafayette Bldg.,
Detroit 26. )73
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD FOR blue-gray, plastic rim
glasses lost near campus. Phone
21600. )66
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOM and private bath. 1
mile from campus available Septem-
ber 15. Call 2-7550 between 6 and
8 p.m. )67
WANTED
COED TO EXCHANGE board and room
for part time housework. State ref-
erences Reply Box 25, Daily. I )46
740 TO '42 CAR in A-1 condition. Reply
Box 11, Michigan Daily or 1367 Erv-
ing Ct., Willow Run Village. )47
ROOMS FOR FOUR veterans for fall
term. Willing to pay for August if
necessary. Price is no object. Notify
Box 10, Michigan Daily. )50
BOARD ONLY desired by 2 gradstu-
dents for fall term. Phone 2-0197
evenings. )65
HELP! I need three Carmen tickets;
Saturday evening. Not necessarily
together. Call Ray Olson, 221 Adams,
2-4401. )79
WANTED TO RENT
TEACHING FELLOW and employed
wife need apartment. Call Mrs.
Bond, 4121 Ext. 2299 during day,
2-6779 evenings. )27
MALE GRADUATE student, veteran,
desires single or double room fall
semester. Paul Roten, 207 Winchell
House, 2-4401. )49
VETERAN GRADUATE student and
wife teaching in nursery school de-
sire apartment. Reply Box 9, Mich-
igan Daily. )51
WANTED-Furnished Apartment im-
mediately by reliable graduate stu-
dent and wife. No children or pets.
Have transportation. Call Ypsi. 3047-
W. )61
APT. close' to campus wants exchange
with Detroit as soon as possible. 2
or 3 rooms. Call 6327,.3-5. )77
DOUBLE ROOM for two student vet-
erans for Fall-Spring term. Tele-
phone 8612, Bob Smith. )72
Continuous from 1 P.M.
ALWAYS COOL!

ART CINEMA LEAGUE Presents

(

SAr Mcu cH;sy;
A rMR/LL 19cA'ED
DRAMA OF lUJ/EAffPDAfTh
(CAPITANO TEMPEMTA)
-Compete EnqllshTitles-
Italy during Venetian-Ottoman Turkish War
Also: Short "ETRUSCAN CIVILIZATION"
Thursday, Friday, August 7, 8 - 8:30 P.M.
Box Office Opens 3 P.M. Wednesday
Admission 45c (tax incl.) - Tickets phone 4121 Ext. 479

11

JL~

u

risis in India . .
Gopal Tripathi, president of the
ndian Institute of Chemical En-
ineers, will speak on "The Pre-
ent Crisis in India" at 8 p.m. Fri-
ay at Robert Owen Cooperative
ouse, under the sponsorship of
he Inter-Cooperative Council.

As advertised in Seventeen

COOLERS
for SIZZLING
AUGUST DAYS
at 1/2 Yearly
Clearances
Prices...
8.30 -10.00 - 12.50
Originally 10.95 to 25.00
BEMBERG
PRINTS
Dark Sheers . . Shantungs
. . Cottons.. Sizes 9-15,
10-44,'1612 to 241/2

* M''N
Ii;O

Im-

A CHECK LIST OF DESIRABLE

COLUMBIA MASTER WORKS
AGAIN AVAILABLE
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 5 in C Minor
Walter and New York Philharmonic
MM 498 .. ........................$5.25
BEETHOVEN: Sonata, Op. 101
Walter Gieseking, Pianist
MX 172 ...............................$3.15
HAYDN: Symphony No. 104 (London)
Beecham and London Philharmonic
M M 409 ...................... . $4.20
LISZT: Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra
Gieseking with Wood and London Philharmonic
M X 17 ................................$3.15
MOZART: Concerto No. 24 in C Minor
Cisadesus with Bigot and Paris Symphony
M M 356 ..... .............. .............$5.25
MOZART: Serenade (Eine Kleine Nachtmusik)
Weingartner and London Symphony
MX 187 ...............................$3.15
SHOSTAKOVITCH: Symphony No. 1
Rodzinsk.i and Cleveland Orchestra
MM 472............:..................$5.25
VILLA-LOBOS: Bachianas Brasileiras, No. 5
Sayao ivith Villa-Lobos and Eight Celli
71670-D ..............................$1.05
WEBER: Concertstuck in F Minor
. Casadesus with Bigot and Orchestra
M X 59 .................. .............. .$3.15
These and many other beautifully recorded
COLUMBIA MASTEIRWORKS are currently

a

Greater Movie Season

I

er ecL n37o'r
ENDING TODAY
A MIRACLE
OF FUN,
'ROMANCE
AND
t LAUGHTER!

I

I

{
j
{

i

Playsuits .. .

I

As pretty a plaid as would warm
the heart of a Scotsman! This
full dirndl-y skirt is whipped in
at the waist with a fringed
scarf! In DEXTER'S authentic
and renowned Clan Plaids,
!nnO! VIRGINI A/f\CV..

Others groups
of Cottons and

Sunsuits. . .
Pinafores

Sizes 9 to 15.

III

I

I i

i

11

I

'?

I & -- - ,-- -7 - --

I

I

f

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan