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June 26, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'layers Will
eature Two
Jnusual Plays

To Give Millay Drama,
New Broadway Show
Two unusual plays by Ameri-
can authors will be featured by
the speech department's Michi-
gan Repertory Players this season.
"The King's Henchman", by the
noted poetess Edna St. Vincent
Millay will receive one of the few
Sperformances it has known in its
original form July 17-19. It was
adapted as an opera by music1
critic Deems Taylor shortly after
its publication and was produd'ed
in its musical setting for three
consecutive seasons by the Metro-
politan Opera Company.
The play, which follows the
Tristan motif, is set in England
in the tenth century. It deals
} with the disloyalty of Aethelwold,
friend of King Eadgar of England,
and its tragic results.
"Temper the Wind", a current
Broadway play on contemporary
problems in occupied Germany
will be presented by the Players
July 31 through Aug. 2.
The play was written first hand
by Edward Mabley and Leonard1
Mins who were stationed in Ger-
many for many months with the
armed forces.
Depicting the struggles of a sin-
cere, far-seeing American officer
to plant everlasting peace, the
play shows not the Nazi, but a
bored soldier and an ambitious
business man as posing the great-
est obstacle in the officer's suc-
cess.
Tickets for both plays may be
purchased at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre box-office..
Helps Students
In Costuming
Prof. Berneice Prisk of Iowa
State University will direct the
costuming of the Michigan Reper-
tory Players for the summer sea-
son.
With a staff of student assist-
ants Miss Prisk will design and
create the elaborate costumes for
the tenth century English "The
King's Henchmen", the Spanish
gypsy costumes for Carmen and
the late Victorian wardrobe for
"Candida."
Union Cards Ready
Union membership cards will be
available at the desk to men en-
rolled for full-time summer pro-
grams, Franklin Kuenzel, Union
executive manager, announced
yesterday.

STAR IN 'CANDIDA'--Beth Laikin and Roger Cleary will star
in the Speech Department's production of Shaw's popular comedy.
*, , 'I. * *
SHAVIAN COMEDY:
Repertory Players Rehearse
For Performance of 'Candidu'

Opera Will Be
Final Offering
Of Summer
'Carmen' Features
Speech, Music Group
The speech department's Mich-
igan Repertory Players, collabor-
ating with the music school for
the thirteenth consecutive season
will present Bizet's "Carmen" as
the final offering of the summer
series.
Although now one of the most
popular of all operas, "Carmen"
was coolly met at its first perform-
ance and its composer died before
it gained its universal popularity.
The opera is set in Seville in the
1820's with the colorfully brilli-
ant music revolving around the
varied activities of the heartless
coquette Carmen whose love of the
excitement of the moment leads
her eventually to her violent
death.
Based on Merimee's romance of
Spanish gypsy and peasant life,
"Carmen", although Spanish in
music, costumes and sets is writ-
ten in Bizet's native French.
Prof. Valentine Windt of the
speech department will direct the
opera assisted by the full Univer-
sity orchestra and music school
students.
Season Wickets
On Sale Now
Season tickets for perform-
ances of the speech depart-
m e n it's Michigan Repertory
Players are on sale now at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
box-office.
Tickets for single perform-
ances will go on sale at 10 a.m.
Monday at the box-office.

(Continued from Page 2)
Faculty Recital: Joseph Knitzer,
Violinist, will present a recital in
Hill Auditorium at 8:30 Tuesday,
July 1. Head of the Violin Depart-
ment of the Cleveland Institute
of Musical Art, Mr. Knitzer is a
member of the summer session
faculty in the School of Music. His
program for Tuesday evening will
include Sonata in D major by Vi-
valdi, Chaconne for Violin Alone
by Bachl, Sonata for Violin and
Piano by Herbert Elwell, Buncome
County, N.C. by Ernst Bacon, Hoe-1
down, from "Roedo" by Aaron
Copland, and Ruralia Hungarica,
by Ernst von Dohnanyi. He will
be accompanied by Marian Owen,
Pianist.
The general public is invited.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Thursday, June 26, at 3:00 p.m.
in Room 3201 Angell Hall.
Algebra Seminar, 3201 Angellj
Hall. Thursday, 3:30 p.m.: S. A.
Jennings: Representations of cer-
tain groups in rings.
La Sociedad Hispanica will meet
at the International Center for
tea on Thursday, June 26 at 4
p.m.
La p'tite causette today and ev-
ery Thursday at 4 p.m. in the In-
ternational Center. All foreign
students interested in speaking
French are cordially invited to
join "La p'tite causette", that
meets also every Tuesday and
Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. in the
Cafeteria of the Michigan League.
Charles E. Koella
A meeting will be held Thurs-
day at 4:00 p.m. at the League for
all girls interested in being hos-

tesses and assistant teachers for
the dancing classes. Classes will
be held each Tuesday at 7:00.
There will be both beginning and
intermediate classes.
There will be a special business
meeting of the Christian Science
Organization Thursday evening,
June 26. at 7:30 in the upper roon
of Lane Hall.
The first presentation of the
Regular Thursday Evening Rec-
ord Concerts will include a group
of Bach's Toccatas and Fugues,
Schuberts Symphony No.5 in B
flat, and Mozart's Divertimenti in
E flat. All graduate students are
cordially invited. The concert be-
gins at 7:45 p.m. in the Rackham
Building.
French Club: The first meeting
of the Summer Session French
Club will take place on Thursday,
June 26, at 8 p.m. in the second
floor Terrace Room of the Mich-
igan Union. Election of officers,
"roup singing of popular French
songs, social hour and on inform-
al talk by Professor Charles E.
Koella entitled: "La grave re-
sponsabilite de la France". All
(Continued on Page 4)
IELD OVER

CLARIBEL BAIRD
. . . visiting director
* * *

Rehearsals are now underway
for George Bernard Shaw's, com-
edy-drama "Candida", to be pre-
sented July 3-5 at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre by the speech de-
partment's Michigan Repertory
Players.
Beth Laikan and Roger Cleary
Players Will
Give 'Arseici
And Old Lace'
Mixing gentle homicide with
gleeful, if slightly murderous,
madness the speech department's
Michigan Repertory Players will
present Joseph Kesselring's now
classic comedy "Arsenic and Old
Lace" July 10-12 at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
The maniacal saga of the two
mild and benevolent maiden la-
dies whose distress at seeing any-
one lonely and unhappy leads
them to kindly administer poison
to such unfortunates all but sways
the audience to the benign theory
of their "charitable" work.
Wtih their brother who is con-
vinced that he is Teddy Roose-
velt, that the staircase is San Juan
Hill and that the basement is Pan-
ama where is building the Pan-
ama Canal lock by lock, the gen-
tle murderesses lead an interest-
ing life.
The long New York run, road
tours and the motion version have
prevented earlier presentation. of
the comedy by the Players..
Tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m.
Monday at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre box-office.

will star in the play which opens
the nineteenth summer season of
the players.
One of the best known of the
S h a v i a n comedies, "Candida"
deals with the home life of the
Reverend Dr. James Morrell an
unimaginative a n d ungracious
"old school" gentleman who is a
stickler for form and dignity, and
his tactful and intelligent wife
Candida.
Candida's personality is an im-
portant factor in the success of
her narrow-minded husband but
the situation is complicated when
Candida tries to help a maladjust-
ed poet and Morrell, misunder-
standing the relationship, declares
that she must choose between
himself and Marchbanks, the
young poet.
The play's ending comes as a
surprise when Candida chooses to
stay with Morrell, saying that
since he is the weaker of the two
he needs her most.
Tickets for the production,
which will be directed by Prof.
Valentine Windt of the speech de-
partment, will go on sale at 10
a.m. Mcapday at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre box-office.
League To Offer
Evening of Bridge
The League will sponsor an eve-
ning of contract bridge for all
students interested at 7:30 p.m.
today in the League.
The sponsors advise students to
come in pairs, although an effort
will be made to find partners for
those who come alone. The room
location will be posted on the main
bulletin board.

U' Graduate
Will Produce
'Millay Drama
Prof. Claribel B. Baird of Okla-
homa Women's College, University'
of Michigan graduate will return
to Ann Arbor this summer to di-
rect the speech department's
Michigan Repertory Players in
their production of Edna St. Vin-
cent Millay's drama "The Kings
Henchman".
The Players' managing director
this summer will be Prof. Valen-
tine Windt of the speech depart-
ment. Prof. Windt has been in
charge of the group since its in-
ception in 1929. He will direct
George Bernard Shaw's "Candida"
and Bizet's "Carmen" this season.
Prof. Windt will be assisted by
Prof. William Halstead, also of the
speech department.
"Arsenic and Old Lace" and
"Temper The Wind" will be under
his leadership this season.

Exhibit: Through June. Rotun-
da of University Museums Build-
ing. "Michigan Fungi".
Events Today
Mathematics S e m i n a r s. All
those interested in Seminar work
in the Summer Session will meet
DRIVER to CALIFORNIA
WANTED
New 1947 Air-Conditioned
Lincoln-12 Sedan. Due to
illness, owner must return
by train. Contact Dr. Aus-
tin, Phi Rho Sigma, 25695,
with references.

Exhibitions

-

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TAVERN

CAFETERIA
LUNCH 11:00-1:30
DI NNER 5:00-7:00
338 MAYNARD STREET
Opposite the Arcade

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CONTINUOUS DAILY FROM 1 P.M.

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Now
Showing

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QUICK WORK ON
PRINTING NEEDS
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RAMSAY-CANFIELD
Ite.
Opposite P-Bell
119 E. Liberty Phone 7900

DRU

at ,
LOWEST POSSIBLE
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Next to State Theatre
Save up to 30% on
DRUGS - COSMETICS
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ON A
Also
Alladin's Harvest News
Lamp of the Sea

Coming
Sunday!

"STALLION ROAD"

..

1

I

THE

DEPARTMENT

OF

SPEECH

presents

THE

MICHIGAN

REPERTORY

PLAYERS.

.

#I

WEEKS

OF

SUMMER

THEATRE

FIVE

PLAYS

I1

JULY 3 TO AUGUST 11

CANDIDA

July 3-5

" George Bernard Shaw once remarked that unless a
play improved with forty years wear it was not worth
writing. Candida is now 47 years old, and remains one
of the major classics of the modern theatre, standing
with Saint Joan and Heartbreak House as Show's best
plays. The resilient humor and high relish of Shavian
dialogue and characters have made this touching
portrait of human intangibles a perennially popular
comedy.

EVENINGS AT 8 P.M. - SAT. MATINEES (Except Carmen) 2:30 P.M.
Superb Entertainmnent
SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE
$4.80 -$4.20 - $3.00Qax Inc.
Single Admissions on sale June 30
Plays $1.20, .90; .60-Oper$1.50,$1.20, .90Tax Inc.
Box Office Hours -]OA.M.-5 P.M. Daily Fxcept Sunday Phone,6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

The Kings Henchmen July 1719
*.The King's Henchman is one of the few plays by
the brilliant American poetess Edna St. Vincent Mil-
lay. It was written in 1.927 and served as the libretto
for Deems Taylor's opera of the same name. It pro-
vides a spectacular portrayal of the court of England
in the tenth century,.and tells the story of tragic love
which other poets have dramatized with the names of
Paola and Francesca, Pelleas and Melisande, Tristan
and Isolde, and Launcelot and Guinivere.

11

Arsenic and Old Lace July10-2
* Critics agree that the theatre, which is several
thousand years old, never produced anything quite

CARMEN

August 7, 8, 9, and 11

Temper the Wind July 31-Aug. 2
e "By lifting an episode out of post-war history, Ed-
ward Mabley and Leonard Mins have written the most
forceful and absorbina topical drama of the season."

11

eFor the thirteenth consecutive season, the School of
Music will collaborate with the Department of Speech
:-.L. - m..-+;rtinn of rnmM, ,ner CnCrmAn is acol-

1)

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