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July 27, 1947 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1941

t

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Illinois Homecoming Boosted;
Corson Plan Rejected at State

The Illinois-Michigan Home-
coming game is leading all sales
of football tickets at the Univer-
sity of Illinois at the beginning of
the 1947 sales campaign, the tic-
ket manager announced this week.
All 80 broadcasting booths for
the game have been sold, he re-
ported.
Flying disk news is not dead
on the campus. Paper plates, with
attached ,omplimentary tickets
for the summer prom, have been
cut loose from an airplane.
The university has acquired a
new decompression chamber, the
chemical engineering department
announced. It is capable of pro-
ducing a simulated altitude of
over 40,000 feet.
At the University of Minnesota,
Communists and members of
other "anti - American" groups
were banned from the campus
AVC membership this week.
"It isn't intended as a witch-
hunt," the chairman said. "How-
ever, this amendment will let the
public know how we stand on the
Communist situation."
About 350 students received de-
grees from the university at com-
mencement exercises Thursday.
The address, "Battle of Educa-
tion," was given by Clemens M.
Granskou, president of St. Olaf
College.
The University Theatre pre-
sented "The Male Animal," the
story of a college professor who
wanted to live a quiet life.
Union trouble still occupies
campus attention. Pending a
strike notice by service employes,
the university charged this week
that "Public Building Service Em-
ployes union is= failing to live up
to a January agreement." The
union disagreed.
Robert E. Christine, manager
of the Union billiard room, was
given a birthday party celebrating
his twenty-fifth year as a Union
employe. He doesn't play billiards.
* * *
At Michigan State College, the
controversial Corson social plan,
for creation of a centralized of-
fice of student social affairs, was
N; deferred by the summer council
this week. That means it was re-
jected.
The plan proposes the hiring of
:. Industrial Survey Held
HOUGHTON, Mich., July 26-
()-More than 40 communities
are included in the industrial sur-
vey program now under way
throughout the Upper Peninsula,
members of the Michigan Press
Association were told here today
at the closing session of an Upper
Peninsula newspaper conference.

a Director of Student Social Af-
fairs to handle all arrangements
connected with the scheduling of
student dances, productions and
benefits.
Administration objections to the
plan were on the grounds that it
failed to "embody definite respon-
sibility to the college."
The second in a series of arti-
cles cabled to France from East
Lansing last March by Eve Curie,
"Chaque G.I. Recoit 672.000 Fr.
'D'Instruction' " appeared last
week in the college paper. The
articles give Mlle. Curie's impres-
sion of college life.
The following is excerpted from
the article: " . . . America helps
the G.I. to get educated 'at the
expense of his rich uncle' . .
still . .. poor students earn money
by doing material tasks . . . no
one finds this degrading . . . with
the extra money, a courageous
couple can rent a charming apart-
ment in a pre-fabricated house.
These were put together by the
dozens on the campus.''
By the hundreds, Mlle. Curie.
* * *
At Ohio State University, beards
are a rare sight on campus, des-
pite a local beard contest in con-
nection with Franklinton Sesqui-
centennial. Hovever, one man on
campus was found with a beard
last week. He said it proved to be
an obstacle to love-making, but
that he had more time for sleep-
ing.
Dr. Allan C. Barnes has been
named chairman of the depart-
ment of obstetrics and gynecology
in the College of Medicine.
Lack of student interest in in-
door swimning closed the Nata-
torium on Sundays, the director
announced.
Festival Slated
For August 10
Colorful folk dances and the
songs of many countries will be
presented during "A Festival of
Nations" at 8 p.m. August 10 in
Hill Auditorium.
The festival will be presented
as part of the Summer Session of
events, according to Director
Louis A. Hopkins. It will be di-
rected by Dr. Hugh Norton of the
speech department.
Purpose of the festiva will be
to show the cultural contributions
made to the American way of life
by other countries, Dr. Hopkins
explained. It will serve as a fit-
ting complement to the Summer
session series of lecture on "The
United States in World Affairs,"
he said.

Coal Contract
Within Limits
Of Labor Law
Smith Questions
Some Provisions
(Continued from Page 1)
ion and two management repre-
sentatives."
"Another important provision
sets up a mine safety committee
at every mine. The committee of
miners is empowered to 'close
mines where the committee be-
lieves immediate danger exists.'
This provision could prove a very
strong weapon in the hands of the
miners," suggested Prof. Smith,
"for apparently the operator's on-
ly recourse under the contract is
against the personnel of the com-
mittee, not against a committee
decision."
In appraising the contract in
its entirety, Prof. Smith said that
the parties have studiously sought
to comply with the provisions o
of the new Act.
"An accurate appraisal of the
effects of the contract at this
time is very difficult," said Prof.
Smith, "but I don't think charg-
es that the new contract violates
the Taft-Hartley Act are valid."
~ummary..
(Continued from Page 1)
gram; setting up a long-range
housing program; broadening so-
cial security coverage to reach
many not now covered; establish-
ing a statutory program to check
the loyalty of federal workers and
job applicants.
International:
It passed: bills authorizing a
$400,000,000 aifl program for
Greece and Turkey and a $332,-
000,000 relief program for needy
nations; a measure for U.S, par-
ticipation in the International
Refugee Organization. The Sen-
ate ratified peace treaties with
Italy, Hungary, Bulgaria and Ro-
mania.
It deferred action on: Inter-
American arms standardization
and cooperation; The St. Law-
rence Seaway; a bill giving legal
status to the State Department's
"Voice of America" broadcasts of
foreign countries, although it fi-
nanced limited operation of the
program; a bill to admit 400,000
displaced persons.
Military: It passed: The Armed
Services Unification Bill; a meas-
ure allowing veterans to cash
terminal leave pay bonds Sept. 1.
It deferred action on universal
military training.
In General:
It cut appropriations deeper
than in any recent year; passed
the labor-management bill over a
veto; twice failed to pass income
tax reduction bills over a veto;:
and yielded to a veto on legisla-
tion to permit import quotas and
fees on foreign wool.

TUG OF WAR THRIVES:
Hope Dims for Four-Power
Agreement on German Unity

Sound Films
On Teaching
To Be Shown

4

'U' DISCOVERY:
Old Wooden Locks Thwarted
Primitive Egyptian Thieves

By WES GALLAGHER
Chief of AP Staff in Germany
BERIN, July 26-(A')-Virtually
all hope has faded in authorita-
tive quarters here that Germany
will be united by four-power
agreement this year or even next.
The economic tug-of-war be-
tween the United States and Rus-
sia over the Marshall Plan clear-
ly splits Germany down the mid-
dle, with Western Germany f all-
ing into the orbit of the Mar-
shall Plan and Eastern Germany
aligned in the Soviet bloc.
Authoritative sources here do
not expect to see this split healed
until one of the two programs
embarked upon by the two powers
is proved unworkable. They do
not expect this proof to be forth-
coming this year, and probably
not even next year, since the Mar-
shall Plan cannot even come into
operation until next winter when
Congress meets again.
Consequently, these sources be-
lieve the coming foreign ministers
conferences on Germany in New
York in September, and in Lon-
don in November already are
doomed to failure.
They point out that the split
over Germany already has wid-
ened since the foreign ministers
conference at Moscow this
spring as a result of Russia's re-
fusal to join in the Marshall
Plan, and that there is nothing
in prospect to change this sit-
uation between now and No-
vember.
On the other hand, these sourc

es say, everything indicates the
differences will widen.
The more gloomy of these sourc-
es even believe that the four-pow-
er machinery in Berlin may col-
lapse, and that the Russians may
request the Western Powers to
withdraw from this shattered cap-
ital. The Russians could make
western occupation of Berlin un-
tenable at any time by simply cut-
ting off the traffic arteries lead-
ing '"to this city through their
zone.
Veterans diplomats here feel,
however, that such a breakdown
will not actually occur. They base'
this feeling on the belief that both
the Russians and the western na-
tions will shrink from closing the
last door to an eventual settle-
ment.
Generally speaking, veteran al-
lied negotiators and diplomats
who havehbeen in Berlin since the
end of the war, are more pessi-
mistic than at any time since the
four-power government of Ger-
many was undertaken.
Not a few for the first time
talk unofficially and among
themselves of a possible war
between east and west. They
liken the propaganda attacks
between east and west and the
rising nervous tension of Eur-
ope to the war of nerves of
1937-39.
But the more thoughtful point,
out that Europe is unprepared and
unfit physically and mentally for,
a showdown of force, and further-
more, that all powers, both east
and west, do not want a confict.

Five
teach"

sound films on "how to
will be given their first

showing at 7:30 p.m. Monday in
the Rackham Amphitheatre. Prof.
P,aleigh Schorling of the educa-
tion school has announced.
The films were developed by
Prof. Schorling, director of super-
vised teaching in the University
High School, in cooperation with
commercial concerns.
Each of the 20-minute films'
takes up specific teaching prob-
lems or schoolroom situations and
demonstrates their solutions by
teacher and pupil. Designed for
use in courses in student teach-
ing, the films may also be useful
in refresher courses for teachers,'
Prof. Schorling said.
The program, which is spon-
sored by the education school is
open to the public.
'Arrowsmith' Filim
To Be Presented.
"Arrowsmith" the movie version
of Sinclair Lewis' novel will be
presented August 3 and 4 at Hill
Auditorium under the sponsorship'
of the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
cil.
The film, which stars Ronald
Colman, Helen Hays and Myrna
Loy, tells the story of a crusad--
ing young doctor .
Tickets may be obtained at the
Hill Auditorium box office.

By TED MILLERj
Thievery, a trade at least as old
as the pyramids, ran into some
stiff competition in thc form of
locks apd keys as early as the
third century, A.D., an exhibit of
early Egyptian life in the arch-
aeology museum shows.
The carved, wooden locks and
keys, designed to thwart house-
breakers, are a part of the dis-
coveries of a University expedi-
tion at the ancient site of Karan-
University Orchestra
Beethoven's "Prometheus Over-
tur' will open the annual sum-
iner concert of the University
Symphony Orchestra which will
be presented at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day in Hill Auditorium.
Works of both modern and
classical composers will be played
by the all-student orchestra, con-
ducted by. Wayne Dunlap of the
music school. Music by Mozart,
Samuel Barber, Faure and Robert
Ward will be included

is, Egypt, a town under Roman
rule in the first four centures, A.
D.
The fact that modern locks op-
erate on the same principal em-
ployed in the wooden models on
display attests to their technical
excellence. Movable pegs, acting
as tumblers, are drawn out of slots
in the door bar by the revolving
key, permitting the bar to slide
freely back. Although the keys
were rude, only the locksmith
could make them. He was the on-
ly one who knew how far apart to
make the projections on the key
in order to match the grooves,
which varied in distance and num-
ber from lock to lock.
Other features of the exhibit's
division on homes are tapestries,
utensils and furniture one might
find in an Egyptian house 2,000
years ago.
Religion, trade and taxes, child-
hood and agriculture are other
phases of Egyptian life treated in
the exhibit, with a separate room
being devoted to each heading.

4I

Al

Continuous

STARTS
TODAY!

Continuous CO
from 1 P.M. COOL!

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Publicationin The Daily OfflciaA
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Summer Session, Room 1213 Angell
Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day pre-
ceding publication (11:00 am. Sat-
urdays).
SUNDAy, JULY 27, 1947
VOL. LVII, No. 24S
Notices
Notice of Regents' Meeting: The
next meeting of the Regents will
be on September 26, 1947, at. 2
p.m. Communications for consid-
eration at this meeting must be
in the President's hands not later
than September 18.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Secretary
Fellowships for Research and
for Creative Work in Fine Arts,
including Music. The John Simon
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
offers a limited number (forty
to sixty) Fellowships for research
and for creative work in the fine
arts with an annual stipend not
to exceed $2,500. Citizens of the

United States, men or women, mar-'
ried or unmarried, between the
ages of twenty-five and forty, who
have demonstrated unusual ca-
pacity for research or who possess
unusual creative ability are eligi-
ble to apply irrespective of race,
color, or creed. Applications must
be made on or before October 16,
1947. For more complete details,
consult the Scholarship Division,
Office of Student Affairs, Room
205, University Hall.
Lee Pattison's lecture recital
scheduled for Monday, July 28,
will be heard at 4:15 in the after-
noon, instead of 8:30. This is the
only program in the Monday ser-
ies to be given at that hour. En-
titled "Action and Reaction," it
will cover compositions by Ravel,
Debussy, Rachmaninoff, and Hin-
demith.
The public is cordially invited.
The Classical Coffee Hour.
..There will be no meeting this
week. The next meeting will be
held on Tuesday, August 5.
Veterans receiving government
educational benefits and who are
enrolled for either the 51/2 or 6
weeks Summer Session are re-
minded that their absence reports
are due by July 28th and may be
deposited at any one of the sta-
tions designated on the reverse
side of the absence report card or
may be mailed to the Veterans
Service Bureau, Rackham Build-
ing.
Veterans are further reminded
that the filing of an absence re-
port is a University regulation and
must be complied with.
Robert S. Waldrop, Director
. Veterans Service Bureau
Doctoral Examination for Bur-

ton Thomas Ostenson, Zoology;
thesis: "Ecologic and Geographic
Variation in Pelage Color of the
Mammals in the Nebraska Sand-
hills and Adjacent Area," Tues-
day, July 29, at 2 p.m. in Room
3091, Natural Science Building.
Chairman, L. R. Dice.
Ralph A. Sawyer
Seniors: College of Literature,
(Continued on Page 4)

Classified
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