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July 28, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

________ THE MICHIGAN DAILY__

Eck

titnesses Hampers

Probe of Georgia Murders

MONROE, Ga., July 27-(P)-The
head of the Georgia State Police told
newsmen today that he had been
hampered in his investigation of
the massacre of four Negroes near
Returns After
Party Squabble
By The Associated Press
The nearest thing to a Leon Trot-
sky in Chinese Communism is a short,
erratic, florid-faced man in his fifties
named Li Li-San.
His name may become well-known.
because like Trotsky he lost out in a
bitter party row years ago-but un-
like Trotsky, he has gone back.
That is, he has gone back as far
as Manchuria, where Associated
Press correspondent John Roderick
found him the other day in Harbin.
Li was using another name, but read-
ily admitted he was the one-time
radical tough guy of Chinese Com-
munism.
He may have changed, as he seems
to be getting along all. right with
Communist Commander Lit Piao.
but he arrived from Russia not long
ago and already his influence seemE
apparent in Manchuria, says Rod-
erick.
Li was educated in France and was
one of the founders of the Chinese
Communist Party along with Mao
Tse-Tunan the present Stalin of
China. After the conservative fac-
tion of the Kuomintang outlawed all
Communists in 1927, friction develop-
ed between the two as to how to fight
the Communist battle.
Li Li-San o'iginated what was
known as his "line" of tactics and
strategy. He wanted to attack cities;
fight big. battles, and be tough with
the people who lagged in the revolu-
tion. Mao said no, that Chinese
Communists had to work slowly and
carefully with the people-particular-
ty the peasants-win their support;'
and not waste strength in big battles
against better-armed enemies.
Li was blamed for the unsuccess-
ful Communist attack on the city of
Changsha in 1930, which got Chiang
Kai-Shek's Kuomintang Government
so steamed up that he launched his
first big military campaign against
the Communists. Both sides host
heavily, and Li's uncautious line was
discredited enough that he found it
advisable to go to Moscow to "study."
H3e stayed there until he recently ap-
peared in Manchuria with a Russian
wife...
How close he is to the Kremlin
ienains to be seen. At the time he
went to Moscow 15 years ago he was
supposed to be in the doghouse be-
cause he had declared that China,
not Russia, was the center of Com-
munist Revolution.

here Thursday because "the best
people in town won't talk about
this."
"They have an idea who it is,"
the police head, Major William E.
Spence said. "We've been out on
things like this before, but never
anything like this."
Major Spence met newsmen short-
ly after the release of a man who he
said fitted the description of the
leader of the armed band which way-
laid J. Loy Harrison, a prosperous
farmer, and theNegroes on the banks
of the Appalachee River.
Man Not Identified
Spence said Harrison failed to
identify the man and said the leader
of the mob was "20 pounds heavier."
In Atlanta, Governor Ellis Arnall
announced he was offering rewards
totaling more -than $10,000 for a
solution of the mob killing of two Ne-
gro farm hands and their wives.
Grimly, he said "I am directing the
Georgia Bureau of Investigation to
keep its investigators in Walton
County, until the guilty parties
have been identified and turned over
to law enforcement officers."
The only comment to come from
Talmadge was that "such incidents
are to be regretted." Talmadge is
vacationing in , Cheyenne, Wyo.
Meanwhile, preparations for the
burial of Roger Malcolm, his wife,
George Dorsey and his wife, victims
of the lynching, .were attracting
scores of visitors to the funera' par-
lor in which their bodies lie. (See'
cut.)
3ureaus Investigate
Shortly after the shooting was
made public yesterday, agents of the
Georgia Bureau of Investigation and
the Federal Bureau of Investigation
swarmed into the county. In the
course of routine work, bullets were
taken from the bodies for checking
by ballistic experts.
Meanwhile, there were expressions
of public concern over the lynching.
Grand Dragon Samuel Green of
the Ku Klux Klan said his organiza-
tion "had nothing to do" with the
mob action, but that he expected Ar-
nall "will try to pin it on us."
Klan Denies Connection
Green also declared "we have no
Klan chapter in Monroe. I know the
Klan had nothing to do with the
killings."
The National Association fort the
Advancement of Colored People,
through Secretary Walter White in
New York, charged in a telegram to
Attorney General Tom Clark that re-
ports of actions of officials in Walton
County indicated they had knowledge
lynchings were to take place.
To this charge, Sheriff E. S. Gor-
don of Walton County replied: "You
just tell 'em it's a damn lie. I don't
care who said it."

Austrian Party
Members Held
By Russians
VIENNA, July 27-(AP)-Two mem-
bers of the Peoples Party were arrest-'
ed last night by the Russians while
on their way home from the meeting
at which Parliament nationalized 81
industries, including some claimed by
Russia as reparations, Austrian gov-
ernment sources said officially today.
The legislators were Hans Kot-
tulinsky and Ferdinance Prirsch, both
of Styria.
Austrian government officials said
they had been unable early today to
learn why the men were detained and
on what charges. They said the men
were taken to Russian headquarters
at Aspern at midnight and held until,
early morning.
A government protest to the Rus-
sian commander is planned.
The Parliament stood defiantly
against Russia in approving the pro-
gram of nationalization,, for 13 of the
81 key industries involved are claimed
by Russia for reparations. Russia
holds the industries, including the
Zistersdorf oil! fields, were German
assets. Austria disputes this conten-
tion.
Today Thru Tuesday
'THE SAILOR TAKES A WIFE
with Robert Walker-June Ally-
son-and-
THEY MADE ME A KILLER
with Robert Lowry

Deputy Ministers In Disagreemei
On Publication of Treaty Texts

PARIS, July 27-UPT)-The Big Four
Deputy Foreign Ministers were in
"complete disagreement" tonight on
their policy in publishing the texts
of proposed treaties with former
enemy states in Europe.
French sources said that sharply
divergent views were expressed this
afternoon at the deputies second
meeting of the day after all four
had agreed at a morning session to
release for publication the agreed
portions of the Italian treaty before
the opening of the general peace
conference Monday.
Acting on this agreement concern-
ing the Italian pact, the British Cent-
ral Information Office distributed the
agreed sections for publication at 11
p.m., Greenwich Mean Time (f p.m.,
Eastern Standard Time), Sunday in
Washington, Lo ndon, Paris and Mos-h
cow.
Just how the split among the de-

puties which developed this after-
noon would affect the ultimate de-
cision on publication of the Italian
text was not clear tonight.
Following their agreement on the
Italian text, the deputies met again
to decide their policy on treaties with
Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and
Finland.
Dr. Francis Gravit
pe~s Tomiorrow
The French Club will meet at 8:00
p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 305 in- the
Michigan Union.
Dr. Francis Gravit of the Romance
Language Department will give an
informal talk on his remembrances
from Provence, France. Group sing-
ing and a social hour will follow.

BODIES OF VICTIMS AT FUNERAL HOME--Coroner W. T. Brown,
places a sheet over the body of une of four Negroes killed by an armed
mob near Monroe, Ga. The two men and two women were seized while
riding with Loy Harrison, a white farmer, who was taking them to his
farm. The farmer was held at gun point while the four Negroes were
taken into some bushes and shot, the first lynching in the nation in
nearly a year.
THRILLS, CHILLS, HORROR!
Set Design for 'Angel Street'
To Instill Psychological Fear

I'

Because "Angel Street" is a psy-
chological mystery drama, every part
of the set and its furnishings are
designed to heighten and inspire fear,
Dean Currie, set designer, said yes-
terday.
The whole set is dark, Currie ex-
plained. The action takes place in
the living room, and that, plus door-
ways to the hall and to the upstairs,
is all that are visible to the audience.
Some of the things that will height-
en the reaction of the audience are
the set color, particular furnishings,
the floor plan of the big house, and
the gas lights, Currie said.
The predominant set color is dark
red, the color of Victorian wall pap-
er. Furnishings of the Victorian
period will be strange to the audi-
ence, and that strangeness, he point-
ed out, will excite some reaction.
Drapes in the doorwaysand the many
objects in the room will afford an
absence of the plain lines that en-
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able one to sweep a room in a glance.
The many objects are characteristic
of the Victorian period, Currie said,
but drapes in doorways heighten fear
in a mystery play.
The floor plan of the huge house
will also frighten actors and the audi-
ence. Action takes place in the living
room on the second floor, Currie said.
The kitchen, dining room and allied
rooms are on the first floor, bed-
rooms on the third, and the attic is
the fourth floor. A large house of
course affords less security because
there are more entrances and door-
ways to watch. Actors will look out
windows and down to the street.
Finaly, he explained; a few well
placed flickering gas lights, will not
only cast shadows, but will add other
interest to -the play. Action always
begins at dusk and continues on well
into the night. Outside light will
drift through the windows, dim and
darken, and the actors will turn up
the gas lights.
The lighting afforded a special
problem on this set, Currie said. Two
small, electrically wired gas lights
on the walls had to have small bulbs
and be connected; with dimmers, so
that light can be intensified and
dimmed as actors turn on the gas.
Gasoline Prices Go Up
DETROIT, July 27-(P)-Gasoline
will cost 20 cents a gallon for regular
and .22 cents for ethyl in Detroit
starting Tuesday, Rankin Peck, exe-
cutive director of the Retail Gasoline
Dealers Asssociation of Michigan, an-
nounced today.
The increase, amounting to 1.2
cents per gallon, is made necessary
Peck said, by a rise in wholesale
prices.
North Main Opposite Court House
- Today, Monday, Tuesday -
Kirby Grant
THE SPIDER WOMAN
STRIKES BACK
Bill.Elliott
in
SUN VALLEY CYCLONE
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