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July 18, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-18

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

General Mihailovic

Dies Before Firing Squad

SUNLIGHT SEARCH:
Spectroscopy Studies Help
Effect Advances In Science

C

Yugoslavs Execute Nine Chetniks
For Collaboration with Germans

v

By The Associated Press
BELGRADE, July 17-Gen. Draja
Mihailovic died at dawn today before
a firing squad.
The bearded, 50-year-old Chetnik
leader who electrified the Allied world
in 1941 by organizing the first Yugo-
slav resistance to the Nazi invaders,
was executed less than 48 hours after
Sturtevant Tells
Of Translations.
Explains Relations of
Old, New Languages
How the linguist is able to translate
the records and documents of early
history by studying the relations be-
tween ancient languages and between
the ancient and the modern was ex-
plained yesterday by Prof. Edgar H.
Sturtevant.
Prof. Sturtevant, a professor emer-
itus at Yale University, is working
with the Michigan Linguistics Insti-
tute as a visiting professor at the
University. He is a specialist in the
Anatolian languages, spoken in anci-
ent times in Asia Minor.
"Our knowledge of ancient langu-
ages such as the Hittite, which was
spoken in the second millenium B.C.,"
Prof. Sturtevant explained, "comes
from several thousand clay tablets
inscribed with cuneiform characters.
Prof. Sturtevant commented that
although Hittite and several related
languages are not spoken today, some
modern tongues were developed from
the san'e "language ancestor" from
which the Anatolian group came.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Ladies gold wrist watch on
University golf course. Saturday,
July 13. Liberal reward offered.
Call Mr. or Mrs. Carey, 7895. (26
LOST: Green Eversharp pen with
gold cap. Sentimental value. Re-
ward. Call room 403, Mosher Hall.
(25
LOST: Eversharp fountain pen in
auto of Willow Village resident.
Contact Don Baker, 24591. (28
LOST: Greenish-blue Parker "51"
fountain pen with silver cap. Li-
beral reward. Contact Dick Bil-
lings. 1923 Geddes. Phone 26674.
(30
WANTED TO RENT
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W. Bancroft, Toledo, Ohio. (23
FOR SALE
PHILCO PORTABLE Radio. Should-
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beautiful. 333 East William. (29
WANTED
WANTED: Sewing-alterations and
refitting of young women's cloth-
ing. Miss Livingston, 315 S. Divi-
sion. 2nd floor, front.
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED: Sewing-alterations and
refitting of young women's cloth-
ing. Miss Livingston, 315 S. Divis-
ion. 2nd floor, front.
PLAN for your fall suits and formals
now. Expert workmanship on cus-
tom-made clothes and alterations.

Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669. (10
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A
better price paid. Sam's Store. 122
E. Washington St. (4
WHAT? Only $3.00! I must have
Dean McClusky of 417 8th Street,
Ph. 2-7360 string my tennis rac-
quet. (27

a Yugoslav military court found him
guilty of treason and collaboration
with the Germans.
Eight others who were convicted
with him were executed in the same
private military ceremony.
People Lose Interest
In this capital, the people appar-
ently lost all interest in the convicted
men once the death sentence was
passed. The only official comment
this morning was this terse an-
nouncement:
"Since the presidium of the Yugo-
slav Parliament rejected the appeals
of the accused men, all 'the death
sentences have been carried out."
Otherwise, Yugoslav authorities re-
mained silent and adopted the atti-
tude that the news of the executions
was unimportant. The sentences had
been carried out swiftly in accord-
ance with the Yugoslav custom of
exacting the death penalty within
two days of its imposition.
Eleven Sentenced
The military court had sentenced
11 men in all to death, but two had
been tried in absentia. They are Pet-
er Zhivkovic, former Yugoslav gen-
eral who once served as a member
of King Peter's government-in-exile
in London, and Maden Jujevic, 51,
former Chetnik commander who now
is believed to be living in Paris.
Twenty - three other defendants
were convicted and sentenced to pri-
son for terms ranging from 18 months
to 20 years.
Formed Guerrilla Band
The guns of the firing squad rang
down the curtain on a tense drama
which began in April, 1941, when
Mihailovic, a regimental commander
with the rank of colonel, fled to the
hills before the advancing tide of
German might and organized a band
of guerrillas.
His exploits in the mountain fast-
nesses won acclaim throughout the
allied world.
Sheldon Warns
Allergy Drugs.
Not Cure-Alls
Despite the development of a new
group of antihistamine drugs, Dr.
John M. Sheldon, of the University
Hospital Allergy Clinic, cautioned
hay-fever sufferers against undue
optimism. .
The drugs have benefitted some
cases of hay fever, hives and asthma,
but often cause drowsiness and fati-
gue, he declared.-
Dr. Sheldon added that the outlook
for hay fever relief isn't entirely pes-
simistic, since victims can be aided
by being hypo-sensitized. This pro-
cess involves the injection of pollen
into the individual's systefn to build
up immunity.
The doctor also pointed out that
the region in Michigan above the
Muskegon-Bay City line is a haven
of relief to many subject to hay fever,
particularly from mid-August to the
first frost.
Womer Veterans
Name Two Officers
Lucille Schultz and Janet Roth
were chosen temporary chairman
and secretary respectively, and work
was begun on a constitution at the
first meeting of the new women
veterans' organization last Monday
at the Michigan League.
Of the 126 women veterans on
campus, more than 30 were present,
and at least 10 more have indicated
an interest in joining the group.
Primarily intended as a social or-
ganization, the group plans to aid
Michigan's ex-servicewomen in or-
ienting themselves to campus life by
providing a medium through which

they can integrate their activities. As
an initial move, a picnic has been
planned for Friday evening, July 19,
at the "Island."
The next meeting of the organi-
zation will be held Monday evening,
July 29, in the Michigan League. All
former servicewomen have been in-
vited to attend.

Ever since the day when a curious
investigator passed a beam of pure
sunlight through a prisim to form a
brilliantly-colored rainbow, on the
wall of a darkened room, the study
of the spectrum has fascinated and
served men of science.
Spectroscopy has made sweeping'
changes and advances in all fields
of science. In the field of chemical
analysis the sensitivity of this type
of test is exceeded by no other ana-
lytical procedure. Silver, for ex-
ample, can be detected in con-
centrations of one part in 10 bil-
Mexicatn.Fih
Oes Tonight

Del Rio Heads
Of 'The Wild

Cast
Flower'

INTERLOCHEN MELODY-MAKER-This eye-opening photo from the National Music Camp at Interlochen,
directed by Dr. Joseph Maddy, of Ann Arbor, reveals that the fame of the camp has spread far and wide.
She's Margot Levy, 16, of Medellin, Columbia, in South America. .Margot's making music in her own South
American way as she can say only "Thank you'" in English. A two-day plane trip carried her from Columbia
to the camp.

Lederle Airs
Views On New
PAC Leader
'More Conservative'
Head Recommended
In choosing Sidney Hillman's suc-
cessor as head of the CIO Political
Action Committee, Philip Murray
should consider a "more conservative,
American-born" leader, Prof. John
W. Lederle, of the political science
department, declared yesterday.
Prpf. Lederle pointed out that this
view of the situation merely consid-
ered the "public relations" stand-
point of PAC. "If this group intends
to influence politics," he stated, "it
would be better not to appoint a lead-
er who might have connections with
the left-wing Communistic labor ele-
ments."
In addition, Prof. Lederle said,
Hillman was criticized because he
was foreign and there is no reason
to believe his successor would not al-
so receive unfavorable comment if
this were the case.
Howeverhe contended, if there is
no suitable labor leader available who
fills these requirements, any "able"
man, foreign-born or otherwise,
would be "a good choice."
Only time will tell what effect
Hillman's death will haveon the
future of PAC, Prof. Lederle declared,
but it is certain that the "personal
relationship and loyalty" that existed
between Hillman and President
Roosevelt, and later President Tru-
man, will no longer be present.
It is quite possible, he said, that
the PAC may move in the direction
of a straight labor third party now
that their personal ties with the
Democrats are weakened.

BY-PRODUCT OF WAR:
Use Of Microfilm Resulted
From Lack Of Nazi Journals

Delores Del Rio will appear in the
Mexican film that is her major dra-
matic triumph, "The Wild Flower"
which will be shown at 8:30 p.m.
today and tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre, sponsored by Art Cin-
ema League.
One of the greatest movies pro-
duced in a foreign land, "The Wild
Flower," is a tragedy of a Mexican
revolution and land reforms.
Contained in the plot are feuds,
revenge killings between families,
conflicts between fathers and sons
and a marriage between a land-own-
er's son and a peasant's daughter.
The story of the Mexican revolu-
tion is told in retrospect as the mo-
ther of the major character relives
the happenings of the revolution.
A short film, "Le Mystere de Mon-
siour de Chateau du De, will be shown
preceding the feature.
Tickets can be obtained in the
League, the Union, and all bookstores.
Persons wishing to obtaii tickets
immediately preceding the perform-
ance, may purchase them in the
League.
Rep. Crawford Replaced
As House OPA Conferee
WASHINGTON, July 17-(0P)-Rep.
Frederick Smith, (Rep.-Ohio) was
named by Speaker Rayburn (Dem.-
Tex.) today to replace Rep. Craw-
ford (Rep.-Mich.) as one of the
House conferees working with a
Senate group on a compromise OPA
bill.

lion and arsenic In one part in 10
million!
The cost of a spectroscopic labor-
atory may easily run to $25,000, but
the equipment soon repays the in-
dustries which employ it by the time
saving afforded. It is thus of tre-
mendous advantage to the industrial
metallurgist and chemical engineer.
Much research has been com-
pleted here at the University's
Spectrographic Laboratory. The air
interrupter, which is a device for
timing electrical sparks in un-
varying intervals, and the analy-
sis of trace elements in iron and
steels were perfected on the cam-
pus. The feasibility of quantitative
spectrochemical analysis in con-
centrations running as high as40 %
was first shown in the laboratory,
which is under the direction of
Prof. Ralph A. Wolfe of the De-
partment of Engineering Research.
Present research. Prof. Wolfe
pointed out, is concerned with, the
development of direct-reading in-
struments, such as Geiger-Mueller
Counters, electron multiplier tubes,
etc. Thes would eliminate the tedi-
ous photographic plate processes now
employed in spectrographic analy-
sis.
The most valuable application of
spectroscopy, however, is its use for
chemical analysis. In practice, the
sample is burned by means of an
arc or spark; the light emitted in
combustion is flashed through the,
instrument, defracted, and photo-
graphed as a characteristic spectrurr,.
The science of spectroscopy may
not seem to directly affect the lives
of those who are not in scientific
fields, but it vitally affects the host
of sciences whose ramifications touch
the daily lives and welfare of all of
the peoples of the world.
Library Exhibits
Rare Manuscripts
An exhibit, "The Bible and Its
Transmission" is on display on the
first floor of' the General Iibrary
from now until the middle of August.
The exhibition, prepared by Ella
M. Hymans, Curator of Rare Books,
shows the evolution of the Bible
from its earliest forms to the present
editions.
Highlighting the exhibition is an
original leaf from the manuscript of
a third century edition of the epistles
of Paul. This is part of the Beatty
manuscript which is owned partly
by the British Museum and partly
by the University.
Part of the exhibition was donated

The wide need for technical in-
formation contained in German doc-
uments whose supply was very limit-
ed, led to the rapid development of
the use of microfilm during the war,
according to Prof. W. G. Rice, Direc-
tor of the General' Library.
Prof. Rice said that important Ger-
man technical journals were neces-
sarily obtained secretly, and usually
only a single copy at a time. Micro-
film came into wide use, he explain-
Plane Pilot Pest
Spotting System Set
DETROIT, July 17-(P)-Oldtim-
ers probably will have little difficulty
recalling this sign on yesterday's au-
tomobiles:
"If you can read this you're too
close."
Now the advice applies to air-
planes.
If you can read the "NC" numbers
on a low-flying plane, call the police.
Dudley C. True, chief of the en-
forcement division of the State Board
of Aeronautics, said that it means
the-plane is .violating the 1,000-foot
legal ceiling over congested areas.
I) Diamonds
,. 1 and 0
Wedding
$'s s RJ NGS
717 North University Ave..
c c> c c

ed, as a means of bringing this in-
formation to those engaged in simi-
lar projects. By making use of 35
mm. film, it was possible to record on
a single roll the contents of a num-
ber of journals.
The role of microfilm and other
photo techniques in the progress
of research will be the subject of
a conference on photographic aids
to be held Friday. The meeting will
be highlighted by two public lee-
tures at 4:10 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
In Rackham Amphitheatre and an
exhibition of photographic material
and equipment.
A second important photographic
aid is lithoprinting. This is more
familiar tok Michigan students for
it is the process used in the publica-
tion of our humor magazine, "Gar-
goyle".

Republican Leader Martin of Mas- to .th University by William Charles
sachusetts asked that the change be Holland, former University Book-
made. Crawford is on a Pacific tour. binder, in memory of his son.
1

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