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July 12, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHI GAN DIILY

-I

IODERN ART IN AMERICA:
Prof. Slusser Lauds Rackham Exhibit

Z

COMMENTS CONTINUED:
Economists Express Opinions
On OPA Price, Wage Controls

H}

By LIDA DAILES
"Pioneers of Art in America" now
on exhibition at Rackham Galleries,
provides a "wonderful opportunity"
for both the professional and lay
viewer, Prof. Jean P. Slusser, of the
School of Architecture and Design
and acting director of the Museum
of Art, said yesterday.
"This exhibition," Prof. Slusser
stated, "has today some of the nos-
talgic charm of dangerous experi-
ences safely lived through and now
beginning to take on the pleasant
coloration of the past. Most of the
battles," he continued, "of which evi-
dence is here presented have long
since been won or lost, and in any
case the fighting has shifted to other
quarters of the field."
Whether to be or not to be a cu-

bist, Prof. Slusser declared, is scarce-
ly a living issue for any contempor-
ary American. Other less mechanical,
more humanly significant forms of
non-objectivism are claiming the at-
tention of our experimental painters
of today. Surrealism, of which no
trace can be found in the work of
the present show, has everywhere put
in appearance, and colors heavily
many current directions.
Prof. Slusser pointed out that it
was interesting to observe the paint-
ers in this relatively early group who
have best withstood the intervening
decades. Marin and Prendergast, both
of whom worked out a rich, personal
idiom of their art, are if anything,
more valid today than ever.
"Many people," he continued, "find
modern painting baffling because

they try to find meaning which it
never intended to give them. Modern
art is the farthest removed from the
illustrational. It makes small at-
tempt to reproduce as such the beau-
ties of nature or of natural forms,
and it has almost no traffic with
sentiment or story telling.
Modern art places its faith in the
beauty of form,, that is, in the de-
signed use in color, line, texture,
mass, a type of beauty which art has
always possessed in healthy periods
and which largely disappeared from
the debased naturalistic academicism
characteristic of painting just before
Cezanne."
The exhibition ,which has been
sponsored by the University's newly
founded Museum of Art, has been
brought here from the Whitney Mu-
seum of American Art in New York
where it was on exhibition through
April and May of this year. The dis-
play will continue at the Rackham
Building weekdays from 2-5 and
7-10 p.m. through July 20.
New Members
Join Flying Club
New members were taken into the
University Flying Club and club poli-
cies were 'discussed at the second
meeting of the season held Wednes-
day evening.
Of the 60 active members of the
club for the summer session, 25 per
cent have commercial pilot licenses,
20 per cent are in the pre-solo class
and another 20 per cent have soloed.
The remainder are possessors of pri-
vate licenses.
A special call for instructors has
been issued, but all those interested,
whether beginners or not, are invited
to join.

(Continued from Page 1)
The experience of this country and
of other countries after the first
World War, when an inflated money
supply, accompanied by deferred de-
mand for civilian goods, set off an
inflationary spiral with the aban-
donment of price controls, should not
be overlooked in making forecasts of
future developments, Prof. Palmer
pointed out. Although historical par-
allels are frequently misleading, eco-
nomic conditions today are suffi-
ciently akin to those of 1919 to give
one cause for alarm.
In a period when it is imperative
that we achieve as quickly as possible
a balanced production and a balanced
price structure, he concluded, stabili
ty in the price level, rather than ar
appreciable rise thereof, should be
the objective.
"I am substantially in favor o
the continuance of the OPA," Harol
M. Levinson of the economics de
partment said when questioned, "ant
feel that the present policy of Con
gress will be detrimental to our eco
nomy in the long run."
Since we have been quite success
ful in keeping prices under contro
during this war, as compared wit]
the last, it is unfortunate to let then
get out of control now, Phillip Brown
visiting lecturer in the economics de
partment, declared yesterday.
Brown was recently in Washing
ton, D.C. with the State Departmen
in the Office of Research and In
telligence. He is teaching interna
tional trade for the summer.
Taking off, price controls at thi
time is deplorable, Brown stated. I
is probable that the increase in price
particularly in food, will lead to ne
wage demands, and higher wages wi
further increase prices. In additio
to higher wages, stoppages in produc
tion will also result, and restricte

production in turn means still higher
prices, he pointed out.
In order to combat this tendency,
Brown declared, we must put pres-
sure on Congress to offset the pres-
sure of those desiring to remove con-
- trols.
t
r Dance Features
Ton Desmond
Tony Desmond and his orchestra,
e formerly the Klaus Kuiper organiza-
e tion, will be featured at informal
d dances from 9 p.m. to midnight today
- and tomorrow in the League Ball-
room.
e Sponsored by the League, the
dances will be held every weekend
f and will replace the Union dances
d of the regular terms. Students may
- attend in couples or without dates.
d Miss Ethel A. McCormick, social dir-
- ector of the League, explained that
- this procedure had been adopted be-
cause the summer term was too short
- for an acquaintance program similar
il to the one which operates during
h orientation week.
m
-, Mexican Dancing
To .Be Demonstrated
t Instruction in Mexican dances will
- be given by Oscar Castillon, author-
ity on industrial recreation and Pan-
American sports, at 10 a.m. today in
is the Women's Athletic Building.
It Castillon is director of recreation
s, for the steel mills of Monterey, Mexi-
w co, and is a guest lecturer of the
ll Department of Physical Education
n and Athletics in its series of lectures
3- on "The Post-war Problems in Phy-
d sical Education."

Swift's Drug Store

U.S. FLAG LOWERED IN PHILIPPINES-American flag comes down
and Philippine flag is raised in Manila, P.I., as the Philippine Islands
become independent. Ambassador McNutt lowered the U.S. flag and
President Manuel Roxas raised the Philippine emblem.
Church Activities Will Include
Discussions, Outings, Canoeing

PRESCRIPTIONS -- STATIONERY

STUDENT SUPPLIES

DRUG SUNDRIES

MAGAZ I NES

Lane Hall activities for the week-
end include the association coffee
hour which will be held in the Lane
Hall Library from 4:30 until 6 to-
day, and the Saturday luncheon dis-
cussion which will begin at 12:15.
Kamla Chowdhry will speak on
"India Today". Reservations may be
made by calling Lane Hall, Univer-
sity Ext. 2148 before 5 p.m. today.-

Games, food, and fire-side singing
will be a part of the Michigan Chris-
tian Fellowship's Bar-B-Q to be held
at the Island today. Anyone who
wishes to attend is instructed to meet
MCF members at 5:30 p.m. in Lane
Hall.
, * * *

Paramount Printing and
Developing of your films

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Two outings have been, included in
week-end plans for the Congrega-
tional Disciples Guild.
A canoe trip on the Huron River
followed by a weiner roast at the
"top of the world", a hill so-named
by guild members is scheduled for
Saturday night. Members will meet
at 7:45 p.m. at the Guild House on
438 Maynard St.
The Sunday evening program of
recreation, supper and worship will
be held at 4:30 p.m. in Riverside
Park. Guild members will return at
6:45 for the Cooperative Religious
program held at the First Congrega-
tional Church.

LIGHT LUNCHES SERVED
AT OUR FOUNTAIN

THE REXALL STORE
ON THE CAMPUS

340 S. State St.

Phone 3534

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: 6-20 Kodak camera at Grad-
uation. Finder please call Vonal
La Rowe, Beal Residence. Phone
2-2521, ext. 132. (16
LOST: Eversharp pen. Name print-
ed "Leonard A. Parr." Reward.
Phone 2-1679. (11
WANTED
WANTED: Sewing--alterations and
refitting of young women's cloth-
ing. Miss Livingston, 315 S. Divi-
sion. 2nd floor, front.
WANTED TO RENT
MARRIED VETERAN desires one or
two furnished rooms for fall se-
mester. No children. Excellent re-
ferences. Junior in Engr. College.
Address, W. Burmeister, 403 Doug-
las Ave., Elgin, Ill. (3
WANTED: Veteran graduate stu-
dent and wife urgently need $a
small, furnished apartment im-
mediately for fall and spring se-
mesters.hNo children, wife em-
ployed..Phone 6286. (14
FOR SALE
BOIS BLANC ISLAND: A beautiful
cabin with 2-story living room and
cobblestone fire place completely
furnished. 12 acres overlooking
Mackinaw Island. Ready to move
in. Complete book of pictures
available. A bargain. Don't miss
this one. Inquire Wm. G. Kirby,
Realtor, 500 Michigan Bank Bldg.,
Detroit.

MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED: Sewing-alterations and
refitting of young women's cloth-
ing. Miss Livingston, 315 S. Divis-
ion. 2nd floor, front.-
WANTED AT ONCE. The names and
addresses of all Alpha Kappa Alpha
women on campus and in Ann Ar-
bor. Call 9247 at once. Roberta
Ellis Britt. (19
MEALS: Excellent, home-cooked, for
students. 604 E. Madison, Phone
4489. (18
BUYING A NEW CAR? See me first
for an economical plan of insur-
ing and financing it. Bob Craw-
ford. Phone 2-7521 in Ann Arbor.
Res. 1662 Monson, Willow Run. (13
PLAN for your fall suits and formals
now. Expert workmanship on cus-
tom -made clothes and alterations.
Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669. (10
"WHY PAY MORE than $3.00 for a
tennis restringing," said over 50
happy customers. Ph. 2-7360, Dean
McClusky, 417 8th St. (6
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A
better price paid. Sam's Store. 122
E. Washington St. (4

l
I
a

DON'T BE SELF-CONSCIOUS-
Use Contact
Lenses
-THE INVISIBLE EYE GLASS

Round table discussions preceding
the Cooperative Forum "What Is
Christianity" will be h'eld at 5:30
p.m. in the Presbyterian Church and
at the Wesley Foundation Lounge by
Presbyterian and Methodist groups
Sunday.
Members of the Lutheran Student
Association will hold a picnic and
out-door meeting at West Riverside
Park Sunday afternoon, it was an-
nounced today.
Persons desiring to attend the pic-
nic will meet at the Zion Lutheran
Parish Hall at 3:30 p.m. and will
leave' from there. Regular Bible
School will begin at 9:15 a.m. in the
Student Center on Hill Street.
A new Bible Study Class that will
meet from 9:30 to 10:30 on Sunday
mornings has been founded by the
Congregational Disciples Guild. The
purpose of the class is to acquire a
new understanding of what the Bible
can give. Rev. Pickerell will head the
discussions.

.A
A4<'.
f
.-
4
.., -^^'
} "' r,
+.a..
Mr

410
Wolverine
Building

Te .
Fp a r

Phone
6019

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!..

DOBBS
Presents
MADAGASCAR

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NOW OPEN!

A-1 CONDITION, Underwood Cham-
pion portable typewriter. Phone
9034 afternoons or evenings. (9
DICTAPHONE (used), Universal
Mercury Candid Camera (new).
Both reasonable. Call 2-7232 or
813 Granger. (7
FOR RENT
FURNISHED APARTMENT avail-
able until Sept. 1. Four rooms and
bath. Call 2-3343 after 5:30 p.m.
(20
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED:' Experienced lino-
type operator in union shop. Per-
manent position. No layoffs. For-
ty hour week. Scale, $1.55 an hour,
highest in state for comparable
cities. Modern plant in residential
suburban city. Daily Tribune, Roy-
al Oak, Michigan.
TUTORING
TUTORING: Private Spanish les-
sons and conversation. $1 per hour.
Call phone 8435. (17
{ G0<=>)0<=>0>0> U
Cottage Inn
Restaurant
512 EAST WILLIAM
8 I

Al. GR2
; rESTAU oir

11

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