100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

wmm

Confusion: Four

Former Grid Captains Return

to

Mic

C

By ALYS GEORGE
If Head Coach H. 0. "Fritz" Cris-
ler wanted to add a little more con-
fusion to the football picture at
Michigan this fall, he could put in
his starting line-up three former
captains and a captain-elect, besides
the already chosen leader of the Wol-
verine eleven for 1946.
Returning to the scene of many
of his spectacular touchdown runs
after a three-year absence, will be
Paul White, captain of the 1943
pigskin squad.
White came to Michigan after
capturing all-state honors in high
school and lived up to his advanced
notices, becoming an elusive back
and a star southpaw passer. While
opponents found it difficult to stop
"Phantom," old man injury slowed
him up in his first year of var-
sity competition, when he hurt his
shoulder in the opening game of
the gridiron campaign.
White was not able to enjoy the
honor of captaining the Michigan
eleven for a complete season, With
only half the schedule played in
1943, the Marine trainee was trans-
ferred and his football days at Mich-
igan were over for three years.
For the fullback spot on the Wol-
verine eleven this fall, Crisler could
call on another former captain of
the football team, in the person of
Bob Wiese. Along with being selected

leader for the 1944 season, Wiese was
also voted the most valuable player
on the squad for the 1943 campaign,
when such gridders as Elroy Hirsch

and Bill Daley were playing for the
Wolverines.
During most of the successful
1943 campaign, when Michigan
ended up at the head of the Big
Ten football parade, Wiese showed
his versatility by moving over to
the quarterback spot to make room
for All-American- Daley, until the
ex-Minnesota star was transfer-
red in mid-season.
Running from his accustomed
fullback position for only the last
three games, Wiese compiled a
total of 341 yards gained from
scrimmage. Defensively, his edu-
cated left foot kept Maize and
Blue opponents well in their own
territory.
Like White, Wiese was only around
to captain the Wolverine eleven for
half a season. Nevertheless he es-
tablished himself as one of the out-
standing exponents of Crisler's spin-
buck play, which was usually good
for those last few yards.
One of the mainstays in the line
behind which Wiese operated was
left end Bruce Hilkene, who was
selected to lead the Wolverines in
1945. He was one of the few sopho-
mores ever to be honored with the
captaincy, of a Michigan athletic
team.
But Hilkene's name never ap-
peared in the programs as the

gridiron captain for 1945. He was of a young and inexperienced Wol-
transferred by the Navy before the verine team.
next season rolled around and Joe The lack of seasoned material was
Ponsetto took over the leadership felt by Crisler when the last gridiron

campaign got underway. Seven fresh-
men broke into the starting lineup
and the quarterbacking of Captain
Ponsetto helped a green Michigan
team through a back-breaking sched-
ule.
An outtanding defensive back as
well as a reliable place-kicker, Pon-
setto sustained a crippling knee in-
jury in the Illinois game last year and
was sidelined for the rest of the sea-
son. However, he hopes to be in
condition this fall to call the signals
for Michigan.
At right end Crisler can call on
the services of Art Renner, 1946
captain-elect. He has held down
the right flank for the last three
seasons, although he was only dis-
charged from the Marines in time
to see action for a part of last
season.
* * *

In the uphill battle staged
an .inexperienced Michigan elev
against the powerful Army jugg
naut last fall, Renner scored t
only Wolverine touchdown, one
the five times Army's goal line w
crossed all season.
Teninga launched a pass from t
Cadets' eight yard line. The b
was tipped in the air by the Ar
defenders and deflected into the at
of Renner, who was waiting in
end zone.
With the backlog of material fr
the war years piling up, this pigs
campaign will see some strange sig
on the gridiron. Michigan's en
in the oddities derby will be a pote
ial starting lineup featuring five c
tains, one on each flank and thi
in the backfield.

Crisler Invites 156 Grldders
To Participate in Fall Practic

JOE PONSETTO . . . who cap-
tained and called the signals on
the 1945 Wolverine eleven, returns
to the gridiron wars this fall.

I.

Harmon Strains Muscle

I OPERATION PIGSKIN

Coach Crisler and Captain Art Renner ... who will guide the fortunes
of the Michigan football team through its nine game schedule this sea-
son. Renner holds down the right end spot.
Top In tra=Muraxl Su ads
. "
C lash in Softball Finals,
Chi Phi, Vets Housing, Chem. Dept. Share
Favorite's Role in Elimination Tournament

D-DAY ., . WISCONSIN

j

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third in a series of articles on the football pros-
pects of Michigan's scheduled 1946 opponents.'
By JACK MARTIN
A DARK HORSE is being groomed up in Badger-land. It was born last
Spring in the pastures of Camp Randall, where Harry Stuldreher got his
first glance of the 1946 Wisconsin football squad. It will reach full maturity
when the clan ifegathers in the pre-season sessions late this month; and by
the time the Badgers come to Ann Arbor November 16 they'may well be one
of the top contenders for the Western Conference crown.
For coming home to Madison are eight of the 1942 regulars which
Coach Stuldreher fashioned into one of the greatest Badger elevens in
history, the team that rudely interrupted the victory march of a power-
house Ohio State machine which "nobody could stop; Also returning
is the substantial part of last year's undermanned squad. Add to both
these groups a liberal sprinkling of stars of 1943-44, and even '41, and
one sees the ingredients of a champion.
The deciding factor, of course, will be the presence or absence of the
'42 greats. Badger coaches'are counting on the return of Fred Negus, all-
Conference }center, Jack Wink, one of the smartest quarterbacks in the
business, Ashley Anderson, another quarter, Don Pfotenhauer, and Wally
Dreyer, halfbacks, Earl "Steamer" Maves, stocky fullback, ends Hank 01-
shanski, Bob Rennebohm, and Farnham Johnson, guards Johnny Galla-
gher, Bob Dean, Men Currier, and Jerry Frei.
HALF THE NAMES in that list were house-hold terms to Wolverine
fans back in 1943. As Marine trainees, transferred here from their
Badger home-land, they proved a strong foundation for that season's.
Michigan champions. Many second-guessers reflect that had this collection
of sophomore stars not been disintegrated by war they might have been
undefeated National Champions in their last two years, for included in
the array were Elroy Hirsch, and Pat Harder.
Now, a good part of these potential Champions are back to take up
the reins again; the question remains whether or not they can be re-
stored to their former greatness.
Last season's returning backs should not be overshadowed by the vets,
however. Both tackle Rex John and halfback Don Kindt will be on hand to
provide Coach Stuldreher with the best kicking department in the con-
ference. George Fuchs, quarterback, and Ben Faverty, Larry Lauer and
George Urbanis will be around to give Negus some competition.
THE SCATTERED COLLECTION of '41, '43, and '44 stars will serve as the
final binding element making the Badger gridiron structure solid. If the
hoped-for return of Earl 'Jug' Girard materializes, Wisconsin will have one
of the most dangerous passing threats in Conference circles. Girard
plagued opposing defenses all during 1944 with his unerring aerials.
Stuldreher has the nucleus of at least three complete lines composed
of tested veterans. At center are Negus, Faverty, Urbanis, and Lauer,
plus Joe Keenan, '43 pivot man, John Galloway and Tom Lacey; at
guards are Gallagher, Dean, Currier, Frei, and Don Alvarez, Gordon
Suber, and Nick Collias, who are reportedly returning; at tackle there
is a host of vets, including Don Lee, '43, Dick Loepfe, '41, Frank Lopp,
'41, Dave Donnellan, '42, and Bruce Elliott, '43.
The, ends may be Wisconsin's weakest position. Hal Haberman is the
only letterman present; but there is always the possibility of converting,
keeping in mind what happened when a certain fullback named Dave
Schreiner was once switched to the flanking task.
Such is the raw material Coach Stuldreher will possess come August
15, when fall practice begins. The raw material is outstanding. The finished
product should be excellent.
PEACE-IT'S WONDERFUL .. .
Cleveland Olive Branch Wilts

COMPTON, Calif., Aug. 10-
Tom Harmon, the flying ex-Mich-
igan hack, was grounded indefin-
itely today by a pulled muscle.
The ex-AAF pilot, returning to
football for the first time since
the war, suffered muscular strain
last week in early workouts with
the Los Angeles Rams, but con-
tinued to play. Today Coach Adam
Walsh said a muscle in Harmon's
right thigh was tied in a tight
knot and ordered him out of uni-
form until it responds to treat-
ment.
Robinson's Two
Homers Nullify
Williams' Pair
NEW YORK, Aug. 10-P)--Aaron
Robinson, tabbed the most improved
player in the major leagues this sea-
son, demonstrated today why he.
has replaced manager Bill Dickey as
the New York Yankees' number one
catcher when he smashed two home
runs against the 'Boston Red Sox,
the second coming with twoeondin the
12th inning to defeat the American
League leaders 7-5.
Rube Melton pitched the Brook-
lyn Dodgers to their 12th win with-
out a defeat against Philadelphia
this year with a three-hit 6-0 shut-
out. Cookie Lavagetto and Howie
Schultz paced the Dodgers 13-hit at-
tack against Ken Raffensberger.
The cellar-dwelling Pittsburgh Pi-
rates won their first game for their
new owners, edging out the Chicago
Cubs 3-2, although outhit 11-6.
The American tail-end Philadel-
phia Athletics who snapped a seven-
game losing streak, won the second
8-3, after dropping the opener 4-1.
Jesse Flores limited Washington to
10 hits in winning his third game in
the nightcap after Early Wynn out-
pitched Dick Fowler in the first game.

V

One of the most successful intra-
mural softball seasons in years will
be culminated next week when the
top teams of all the leagues come
together for a battle to decide the
all-campus championship.
From comparative records, three
nines emerge as definite pre-tourney
favorites. Chi Phi in the Fraternity
loop, Vets Housing in the Inde-
pendent, and the Chemistry Depart-
ment of the Faculty League have all
enjoyed undefeated schedules.
The Chemistry team may well be
the dark-horse outfit of the compe-
tition. While the Faculty League,.
itself, had experienced some diffi-
Peterson Out,
Dixon Advances
In State Tennis
FLINT, Mich., Aug. 10-(R)-Top-
seeded Rex Norris of Lansing whip-
ped Wendel Chapin of Bay City 6-2,
6-4 here today to move into the semi-
finals of the men's singles division
of the Michigan Closed Tennis
Championships but second-seeded
Kimbark Peterson of Ann Arbor fell
in a decisive upset.
Eric Pratt of Kalamazoo toppled
Peterson handily, 6-3, 6-2, to roll into
the semi-finals, which were post-
poned until Sunday morning becausej
of rain.
Bob Dixon of Ann Arbor whipped
Fred Otto of Detroit, 6-2, 6-0, and
Alex Hetzeck of Hamtramck had to
hustle to down Leonard Johnson of
Detroit, 3-6, 8-6, 6-2 in other quar-
ter-final matches.
Semi-final matches in both men's
and women's singles will be played
tomorrow morning with finals in the
afternoon.

culty in arranging a satisfactory
schedule, the Chemistry squad vent-
ured out on its own and defeated
some of the highly-touted teams from
the other loops in unofficial con-
tests.
Managed by Beacom
Managed by Lloyd Beacom, the
team is composed of graduate fel-
lowship students in the department.
The other two fraternity nines in
the tournament are Sigma Chi and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, while Rumsey,
Prescott, and Tyler Houses form the
contingent from the Residence! Hall
League. Each of the latter ,teams
won five games and lost two in
scheduled competition to tie for the
league title.
The first round contests will be
played on Tuesday, .the winners meet-,
ing Wednesday in the semi-finals.
The final championship game is on
Thursday. All games begin at 6:15
sharp.
All Tourneys Near End
Howard Leibee, summer intramural
director, declared yesterday that all
the I-M tournaments will be com-
pleted next week.
The tennis' singles semi-finals are
scheduled to get under way Tues-
day, and the final match to de-
termine the campus champion will
be played by the end of the week.
The doubles finals will be played
Tuesday.
Mr. Leibee also said that a plan
was considered which would pit the
four flight champions from the golf
tourney in an individual match for
the all-campus title.

104 Spartans
Summoned -to
Fall Practice
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING, Aug. 10-Invita-
tions have been sent to 104 Michi-
gan State football prospects and a
hundred others are expected to re-
port when Coach Charley Bachman
blows his whistle for the initial prac-
tice session of the Spartan gridiron
candidates on August 26.
With a 10-game schedule in the
offing, Bachman has announced that
he will hold two practice periods a
day, one in the morning and the
second in the afternoon.
The two-hundred player turnout
will be the largest in East Lansing
history, and just to make sure that
all the players get their fill of action
this year, the Spartan coachhas
arranged a junior varsity schedule
of at least six games.
Bachmman's passing ace, Russ Rea-
der will be included among the rec-
ord turnout. Reader, a transfer stu-
dent from Michigan placed second
among the nation's passers last fall.
In addition to Reader, Bachman will
have ten lettermen back from last
season's squad.
The State forces will open with
Wayne on Sept. 28, and afterwards
will follow with Boston College, Mis-
sissippi State, Penn State, Cincinnati,
Kentucky, Michigan, Marquette,
Maryland, and Washington Sate.

Warns Candidates of
Hard Schedule Ahead
Invitations to report for the ope
ing of fall practice, Monday, Aug
26, were mailed yesterday to :
candidates for the 1946 University
Michigan football squad.
Sixty-nine prospective play
were invited to return as memb
of Coach H. O. (Fritz) Crisler's nb
Wolverine eleven while the rema
der were welcomed back and invi'
to try out for the team.
Grueling Schedule
In asking candidates to report A
gust 26, Crisler reminded them
the grueling nine-game sched
Michigan faces, starting with :
diana here, September 28, and rL
ning . through Iowa, Army, Nor
western, Illinois, Minnesota, Mic
gan State, Wisconsin and Ohio Sti
He asked that candidates sp
up their individual preliminary tra
ing and make every effort to rep
in first class physical condition.
reminded them that many were i
GI's who had .been away from fo
ball anywhere from one to f
years.
"Lot of Work"
"It is going to take a lot of w
for many of you to gets into con
tion," Crisler "said. "Some play
have been away as long as f
years. One doesn't gain football sp
and endurance overnight."
Thirty-five of the 156 men s
invitations are previous letter-w
ners. Nineteen are from last ye:
squad, seven from 1944, two fr
1943's Conference champions,
seven from 1942.

Ir

i

'Jo

CAev 3A x4/wagjJ

p
[4/ f
',

A diamond ring of
unsurpassed elegance -
A wedding band that
speaks eloquence -

IT'S YOUR HAIR!!
Let us blend and shape
your hair to your features.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State & Michigan Theatres

I

11

I

Major League Standings

I

1E

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Brooklyn ......
St. Louis......
Chicago.......
Boston. ........
Cincinnati ....
New York ....
Philadelphia ..
Pittsburgh ....

W L
65 40
61 41
55 47
51 51
48 53
47 57
43 59
39 61

Pct. GB
.619
.598 22
.539 81/
.500 121/z
.475 15
.452 17%/
.422 20%/
.390 232

DANCING at the Famous
Blue Lantern Dance Pavilion
to BUDDY BRUCE and Orchestra
THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY - Starting at 9 P.M.
RESTAURANT and REFRESHMENTS
ISLAND LAKE - 2 Miles East of Brighton on U.S. 16

CHOOSE HER RING from our complete selection
of White Rose and Blue White Diamonds. Our
matched sets in solid gold are constant remind-
ers of your' love.,

I

I1'

69itlA

p.

1 31,

SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York at Boston (postponed)
Philadelphia 6, Brooklyn 0
Chicago 3, Pittsburgh 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE

2 2 1 EA S T LI BERT Y

STREET

r

E1

GREEN BAY, Wis., Aug. 10-(P)
-Ted ritsch, who hopped to the
Cleveland Browns of the All-
American Conference, rejoined the
Green Bay Packers today and
Coach E. L. (Curly) Lambeau said
there "absolutely had been no deal"
with the rival league on a player
exchange.
* * *
BOWLING GREEN, 0., Aug. 10-
(A)-The Cleveland Browns today
tossed the All-America Conference's
first player-deal "olive branch" at
the National Football League in a
proposal involving ex-Green Bay
Packer fullback Ted Fritsch-but
the branch appeared to be withering
in blasts emitted by two senior cir-
cuit clubs.
Paul Brown, general manager-
coach of the Browns, said the Cleve-
land eleven would return Fritsch,
who signed a contract with the team
,=0=0=0=0 0=07

after bolting the National League,
to Green Bay "on condition that the
Packers and Los Angeles Rams com-
plete a three-way deal."
The proposal involved transfer of
contract rights to a Green Bay play-
er now in service to the Los Angeles
Rams, who would complete the "trip-
le play" by withdrawing their suit
for a court order restraining ex-Ram
tackle Chet Adams from playing with
the Browns, the Cleveland coach
said.

W
Boston ........ 76
New York .. .62
DETROIT .... 59
Washington .... 54
Cleveland ......52
St. Louis ...:...46
Chicago .......46
Philadelphia .. 31

L
32
44
44
54
56
59
61
76

Pct. GB
.704
.585 13
.573 14 V
.500 22
.482 24
.438 29
.430 29 V
.290 44 V

We Have Loads of New Books

FOR SUMMER RELAXATION

SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Boston 5
Philadelphia 1-8, Washington 4-3
Cleveland 5, St. Louis 3

. __ . . .
_ r

-.

DO SOME1'HlN6! JOE OH,HE~ ALWAYS DOE~S
JUST JUMPED DOWN THAT WHEN HE'S INJ A
'rHE l.EVATOQ SNAF1T' HURRY 'ro GET HOME
TO LISTEN TO
WPAG

I

II

on the Air
7:00 A.M.
to 7:30 P.M.
in August
Dial 1050
r

We suggest such titles as:
THE SALEM FRIGATE - BY JOHN JENNINGS . . .
THE ADVENTURES OF WESLEY JACKSON - SAROYAN
LAST CHAPTER -- ERNIE PYLE . . . . . . .
THEN AND NOW - W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
OUR OWN KIND - EDWARD McSORLEY . .
THE FUTURE IN PERSPECTIVE - SIGMUND NEUMANN .
A MOTH OF TIME-- NOLAN MILLER .
BELL TIMSON -MARGUERITE STEEN . . . .

. '$3.00
2.75
2.50
2.50
. . 2.50
4.00
2.75
. . 2.75

_..
"=-{
~~

o O.r

And many others for your warm weather enjoyment.

lod

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan