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July 03, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC

IGA

LY

'THERE IS NO BASIS WHATEVER FOR WAR':
Soviet Ambassador Optimistic About World S

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THIS CZECH YOUNGSTER seems to be afraid someone may take
away his weak soup and bread crust. It is his one meal for the day.
There are millions of others in Europe and Asia who have not even
}this meager ration. You can help save them from starvation by1
giving money or food "in tin cans to the Emergency Food Collection.'

WASHINGTON, July 2-(AP)- So-r
viet Ambassador Nikolai V. Novikov
expressed belief today that "there
is no basis whatever for war" between#
his country and the United States,
and declared he was confident all
differences between them will be
"ironed out."
In his first interview with an Amer-
ican reporter since he presented his1
credentials to President Truman a
month ago, Novikov said with feel-
ing:
"I know this-that the people of7
the United States do not want to wage
a war against the Soviet Union or
any other country. I know the Soviet
Union will never start a war against
the United States or anyone else.
Admits Optimism
"Thus, any differences between us
must be ironed out. I believe they
will be ironed out.
"To that extent, you might say I
am an optimist," Novikov added with
a grin. He had been asked if he were
optimistic about the world situation
and particularly about American-
Soviet relations.
However, the ambassador empha-
sized his belief that solutions for all
existing world problems would not
be hammered out overnight. Many
would require time and patience, he
said.
"Europe is now in its most difficult
period-the transition from war to
peace," he said. "Problems inevi-
tably will be difficult."
Wants Deliveries
Asked how the United States could
best assist the Soviet Union in re-
building areas devastated by German
aggression, Novikov said
"First of all, we wish the Allies,
including the United States, would
carry out the agreements on repara-
tions from Germany, especially in re-
spect to deliveries from the western
areas of Germany to the U.S.S.R. It
would facilitate our reconstruction
Troops Fire at
Rioting Hindus
AHMEDABAD, India, July 2-(P)
-Troops fired rifles into rioting
crowds of Hindus and Mslems in
Ahmedabad today to suppress "ar-
son and looting" and the toll in
continued communal clashes rose to
33 dead and 250 injured.
Crowds fought with stones and
knives in new clashes starting after
the lifting of the curfew at 6 a.m.
The 25th Rajputana rifles opened
fire at noon to control some "fla-
grant cases of arson and looting" ac-
companying the riots, a Bombay pro-
aggression, Novikov said:
One person was reported killed in
similar disorders in Monghyr in Eas-
tern India, 250 miles northwest of
Calcutta.
'U' Alumnus Heads
New Philippine Post
Dr. Bernabe Africa, new Philippine
commissioner of foreign relations, is
an alumnus of the University of
Michigan.
The new commissioner will be the
first undersecretary of the Philippine
Department of State when the Philip-
pines are given their independence
this week.
Dr. Africa before the outbreak of
the war was professor of foreign ser-
vice and political science in the Uni-
versity of the Philippines.

of the devastated territories of the
U.S.S.R."
He said deliveries of industrial re-
parations from the western occupa-
tion zones to Russia-now halted en-
tirely-had amounted to little, so far
as Soviet rehabilitation purposes were
concerned.
Some devastated Soviet areas, par-
ticularly the Ukraine, could make
good use of equipment from plants in
the western zones having to do with
manufacture of iron, steel and related
products, he added.
In reply to a question, the am-
bassador said he believed the Soviet
fear that the Western Allies did not
actually intend to destroy Germany's
war-making capacity would continue
until the plants actually were dis-

mantled or made available as repara-I
tions.
Novikov did not mention the talk-;
ed-about billion-dollar American loan
for Russia, but said a "more inten-
sive trade" between the two nations,
could be "of great importance" in,
the Soviet rehabilitation program.-
This, he said, would be "of no less;
advantage for the U.S.A., itself."
Predicts Russian Tours
For half an hour, the ambassador
-who has seemed reluctant to talk
to newsmen during his State Depart-
ment visits-chatted easily in a soft,
high-pitched voice on a variety of,
subjects. He seemed eager to answer
all questions completely and to make
his position absolutely clear.,
He said he presumed it would be

I, "o

possible for Americans to travel in
all parts of the Soviet Union as soon
as facilities "essential for the normal
service of tourists" are restored.
Novikov added he hoped to travel
widely in the United States, but said
this would depend on circumstances
of his work as ambassador and as
Soviet representative on the Far East-
ern Commission. He mentioned his
recent trip to Detroit.
Asked what was needed most to
build greater understanding between
Russia and the United States, Novi-
kov in his written answers listed "A
careful handling of that which has
already been achieved by both count-
ries as the result of their mutual co-
operation during the war and of the
victory over the common enemy."

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