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August 04, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-08-04

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T. _ --..
awl

AVC Chairman

BULLET

'ICIAL
'IN

11-

Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Summer Ses-
sion, Room 1213 Angell Hall by 3:30 p.m.
on the day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).

Comments on
Veterans' Riots
'Battles over Ballots'
Are Not Sanctioned

4

Colloquialisms Are Discussed
By Linguistics Society Expert

SUNDAY, #AUGUST 4, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 24S
Nwo tices

City of Detroit Civil Service Com-
mission Announcements have been
received in this office for:
1. Occupational Therapist, $2,591-
$2,936. Closing date is Aug. 9.
2. X-Ray Technician, $2,373-$2,-
769. Closing date is Aug. 8.
3. Trained Nursing Attendant, $2,-
315-$2,385. Closing date is Aug. 8.
4. Nutritionist, $2,657-$2,930. Clos-
ing date is Aug. 7.
5. Student Technical Assistant
Specialties: Engineering, Business
Administration, General Science,
Physical Education, Social Science,
$1,928-$2,080. Closing date is Aug. 7.
6. Student Social Worker, $2,109-
$2,295. Closing date is Aug. 6.
'7. Social Case Worker, $2,475-$2,-
835. Closing date is Aug. 6.
For further information call at the
Bureau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional information, 201 Mason Hall.
All Veterans enrolled in the Univer-
sity under Public Law 16 or 346 who
are not receiving subsistence allow-
ance are requested to report to Rm.
100 Rackham Building Monday, Aug-
ust 5, between the hours of 8:30 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., so that action can be
taken to expedite payment of sub-
sistence due.
The regular meeting of the Uni-
versity Women Veterans Association
will be held at 7:00 Monday evening,
August 5, at the Michigan League.
A discussion of the coming year's
activities will be held, and all inter-
ested service women are urged to
attend.
The Kamehameha School for Girls
in Honolulu has an eighth and ninth
grade English position. Candidates
should have some training in speech
correction, remedial teaching, and
be able to put on an eighth grade
play. This position is for a woman
between twenty-four and thirty years
of age with two years of teaching
experience. For further details call
the Bureau of Appointments, Miss
Briggs.
The Board of National Missions of
thePresbyterian Church in the Uni-
ted States of America has teaching
v7acancies in Alaska, New Mexico,
Arizona, Utah in the following fields:
English, Home Economics, Music,
Mathematics and Science, Social Sci-
ence, Commercial, Arts and Crafts,
Manual Arts, Elementary, Physical

"The G.I. 'battle over ballots' in
Athens, Tenn. shows the extent to
which veterans will go when con-
fronted by corrupt situations-politi-
cal or economic-at home," Jack
Weiss, chairman of the local chapter
of the American Veterans' Commit-
tee, told The Daily last night.
"Men who were accustomed to the
use of force against tyranny abroad,
find it easy to use such methods when
faced with no other alternative at
home," Weiss added.
Weiss emphasized that while A.V.-
C. supports the action of the Tennes-
see ex-G.I.'s in fighting against "ma-
chine" control, it does not necessarily
condone the use of force. He noted
that Charles Bolte, A.V.C. national
chairman, yesterday in Washngton
supported the Tennessee G.J. "non-
partisan group" in their fight against
a corrupt political machine, but did
not aprove the use of force in such
instances, except when there is no
other alternative.
(Over a thousand ex-servicemen
and supporters besieged the Athens,
Tenn, jail on Friday in an attempt to
recapture ballot boxes allegedly stol-
en by supporters of the Tennessee
"Crump" Democratic machine.)

"Shoo-fly pie" was among the Mid-
land regional colloquialisms describ-
ed by Prof. Hans Kurath at the meet-
ing of the American Linguistics So-
ciety yesterday.
The American Midland region, ac-
cording to Prof. Kurath, is composed
of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Dela-
ware and portions of New Jersey,
West Virginia and Ohio. Unique in
that the North and South are the
areas usually recognized by historians
and geographers, this region has de-
veloped a distinctive vocabulary of'
terms relating in the most part to
the farm and house.
Words are considered typical of
AVC To Stage 'Policy
Meeting' in Union
Vic Baum, campus AVC vice-chair-
man and policy committee member,
today urged all present AVC mem-
bers and other veterans interested
to attend a "giant policy meeting" of
the local chapter at 7:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday in the Michigan Union.
The Wednesday meeting, Baum
said, will formulate plans for fall
AVC action, including a membership
drive which will reach "every veter-
an on the campus."
No other meetings of the local
chapter of the American Veterans'
Committee will be held during the
summer session, Baum added.

an area, Prof. Kurath explained, if
they originated there and are little-
used elsewhere. Typical of the Mid-
land region are such terms as "snake
feeder" for dragon fly, "spouts" for
guttes, "poke" for a paper bag. "you
'ns" for the plural of "you," "worm-
fence" for a rail fence built in zig-
zag fashion, and "jack-bite" for a
between-meals snack.
The study of colloquialisms and
regional vocabularies which Prof.
Kurath has conducted are a dart of
a long-range project of the American
Council of Learned Societies, which
plans to publish a linguistic atlas of
the United States. The atlas will
show the various speech regions of
the country, comparing them with
geographical and historical regions.
Other speakers yesterday included
Professors H. Penzle of the Univer-
sity of Illinois, J. K. Yamagiwa of the
Universit yof Michigan, E. A. Nida
and F. Frauchiger of the' University
of Oklahoma, T. A. Seboek of the
University of Indiana and B. Elson
and Joyce Jenkins of the Michigan
Summer Institute 'of Linguistics.
Pledge Buyers' Strike
DETOITP, Aug. 3-(,')-The CI0
United Auto Workers said Saturday
that a city-wide buyers' strike is
.planned for Aug. 10th with picket-
ing of all major shopping centers.

i

0.

I
4

KAMLA CHOWDRY, left and William Correa, right, talk to Anasooya Bharatiya, center, about a survey Miss
Bharatiya is making to determine the needs of foreign students in their orientation to U.S. campus life,
FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING:
9-N
U' India'Students Urge Nation's Freedom

U
4

Students from India on the Univer-
sity campus feel that the way is open
for better relations between Ameri-
cans and the people in their land-
but not until after India gains free-
dom from British domination.
Whether Moslem or Hindu, the
students are agreed that this inde-
pendence must come. They maintain
there can be no' full understanding
of India by people of other countries,
nor real industrial or educational
progress in their nation, until it is
an accomtplished fact.
This intense nationalism thus
seems to be a stronger feeling than
religion itself for them. 'One of them
describes it as the "new religion" in
India.
The group is one of the most active
and. colorful on campus. Through
the Hindustan club, it presents lec-
Education. Salaries consist of cash
stipend, maintenance, and traveling
expenses to field. Full details may be
had at the Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
The Ballroom Dancing Class that
regularly meets on Tuesday night
at 7:30, will meet on Wednesday,
August 7.
(Continued on Page 4)

tures, dance recitals and other en-
tertainment programs throughout the
state in an effort to effect a better
understanding of India's internal
problems.
Syed Sibtay Hasan, 31, correspond-
ent for a chain of Indian newspapers
who recently visited Ann Arbor on
a tour. of the country reported that
the views expressed by the local
students are shared by the vast ma-
jority of the people of India.

"Americans simply cannot know
about India because of British re-
strictions imposed upon the informa-
tion that comes out of our country,"
Hasan, a Moslem from Upper Prov-
ince, said. "Added to this is a failure
of American universities and colleges
to offer courses in the rich culture{
of the Far East in an attractive and
sympathetic way."
William Correa, 22, a University of
(Continued on Page 5)

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