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July 31, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-31

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senate Fasses
Social Security
Tax Freeze'
Knutson Blocks Efforts
For Joint Conference
WASHINGTON; July 30--OP)-The
Senate approved a Social Security
Tax "freeze" today after adopting an
amendment providing a sliding scale
of Federal grants for needy aged,
the needy blind, and for dependent
children.
The measure provides that
throughout 1947 the, Social Security
payroll tax shall remain at the pre-
sent rate of one per cent each on
employes and employers. Unless the
freeze is enacted, the tax will go up
to 212 per centeach the first of the
year.
The bill went back to the House,
where it immediately bumped into
trouble. Rep. Knutson (Rep., Minn.)
bl)c1ed an effort by Chairman
Doughton (Dem., N.C.) of the Ways
and Means Committee to send it to
a House-Senate Conference Commit-
tee for adjustment of the differences
beween the two Houses.
Knutson objected to a unanimous
consent request to send the bill to
the conference committee. The Min-
ne;ota member is fighting the Sen-
ate sliding scale' provision, which
would result in larger Federal pay-
meits for the needy in low income
states.
The provision was designed to eli-
minate some wide differences in in-
dividual case grants now existing in
ich~ and poor states. At present the
Fcicral Government matches state
msney for such cases on a 50-50 basis.
Other sections of the bill would
provide survivors insurance for vet-
erans' families, extend unemploy-
mwent compensation to cover mari-
time workers, increase child welfare
expenditure and provide for study of
lhe Social Security program by an
internal revenue commission.
Bennett To Attend
MSA Conference
Dean Wells I. Bennett of the School
of Architecture and Design will at-
tend the midsummer conference of
the Michigan Society of Architects
on August 2 and 3 on Mackinac
Island.
Dean Bennett will be accompanied
by Prof. Ralph W. Hammett and
Pn-of. Walter V. Marshall, also of the
architecture school.
A member of the Michigan State
Registration Board of Architects,
Engineers and Surveyors, Dean Ben-
nett will also attend a meeting of
that group on August 2 on the
Island.
f ,

Field Marshal Wilson Reveals
Southern France Assault Plans

BOARD - Roy L. Thompson
(above), president of New Orleans
federal land bank, was nominated
by President Truman to head the
Price Decontrol Board established
under the revived OPA.
Helicper Plant
Called Feasible
The proposed helicopter service be-
tween Willow Run Airport and De-
troit awaits development of a larger
helicopter before the project can be
declared practicable. 4
Experiments' with two three-pas-
senger and pilot helicopters com-
pleted last month, were declared "en-
tirely satisfactory" by D. B. Kirk,
spokesman for the Greyhound Bus
Lines, which are considering the new
service. .
The plan is quite feasible, accord-
ing to Kirk, but will probably not go
into action until the larger helicop-
ter is developed. Igor Sikorsky, Kirk
said, is now working on -the type
which may ultimately be used.
Sikorsky, the inventor of the heli-
copter, witnessed the Greyhound
practice tests early this month.

WASHINGTON, July 30-(J)-Bri-
tain's Field Marshal Lord Wilson dis-
closed today that the final decision
for the 1944 invasion of southern
France came just five days before it
struck.
With troop and supply ships al-
ready loading for the long-planned
assault,*the combined chiefs of staff
over-ruled the idea of shifting the
whole thing to Brittany in western
France. The rapid sweep in the North
had brought up the possibility at the
last minute that an unopposed jump-
off into Brittany might be mote pro-
fitable.
Go-Ahead Came Aug. 10
Wilson, then General Sir Henry
Maitland Wilson, supreme Allied
Commander inthe Mediterranean,
recounted in .a report to the com-
bined chiefs that their go-ahead came
on Aug. 10 and that the Allied assault
on the Riveria was launched on Aug.
15. In two weeks the Germans were
almost completely swept from south-
ern France.
Wilson had suggested in June a
drive through northern Italy would
be more effective, the report related.
But General Dwight D. Eisenhower's
view ultimately prevailed that Mar-
seilles must be taken to provide addi-
tional port capacity to support the
decisive Battle of France.
Wilson's report, a 20,000-word doc-
ument released through the War De-
partment, sheds new light on the
high-level strategic planning. Among
his disclosure were:
Clark First Choice
1. Lt. Gen. Mark W. Clark, then
American Fifth'Army commander in
Italy, was Eisenhower's first choice
to command the southern France
operation. Lt. Gen. Alexander M.
Patch, who since has died, later was
chosen.
2. General DeGaulle and General
Giraud urged that a French'general
command the expedition, but were
overruled since the three assault di-
visions were American, and language
and command difficulties might
cause complications.

3. Several times preparations for
the invasion were cancelled outright
chiefly because of the demands of the
Italian campaign and the shortage of
shipping to transport an expedition
of some 250,000 men.
Lee To Speak on
Handicapped
Children Today
The Exceptional Child Below Six
Years of' Age will be discussed by
John Lee, Dean of the Graduate
School of Wayne University at 3
p.m. today in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Lee has been active for years in
the field of special education for the
handicapped child. The exceptional
child, in Lee's field is one who does
not have requirements that would
enable him to fit in with other chil-
dren.
Lee, who has been making an in-
tensive study of the problem of the
handicapped child, is the best known
sponsor of legislation for the edu-
cation of the handicapped child in
Michigan. Legislation sponsored by
Lee establishes training schoolstfor
the handicapped all over the state.
When a minimum number of such
children gather at a school, a special
teacher qualified to teach the speech
handicapped is hired. The teacher's
salary is then paid by the State De-
partment of Public Instruction, the
Division of special education.
The Department of Special Edu-
cation also finances training of the
orthopedically handicapped, the
blind, the deaf and the hard of
hearing, epileptics and cardiac pa-
tients.
Lee is past president of the Inter-
national Council for exceptional chil-
dren, and was general advisor in
special education at Wayne Univer-
sity, and in the Detroit public school
system.

Will Feature
Edwards' Band
A semi-formal dance featuring Jer-
ry Edwards' orchestra will be held
by the Graduate Student Council at
9 p.m. Friday on the Rackham Build-
ing terrace.
The orchestra will play Cuban
numbers and a wishing well will be
the central theme of the decorations.
Refreshments will be served.
The dance is an annual affair,
according to Dallas Hawkins, of the
council, and is open to graduate stu-
dents and their friends. Tickets are
being sold at the League, Union and
at the checkroom in Rackham.
General chairman of the dance
committee is Arvillamae Chick, tick-
ets are being handled by Paul Coy,
and Ruth Stein is in charge of decor-
ations.
Rae To Leave
For Washington
Prosecntor John W. Rae will leave
today for Washington, D.C. with an
extradition warrant for Maynard
H. (Snuffy) Smith signed by Gov.
Kelly.
Smith, a winner of the Congres-
sional Medal of Honor, is charged
with failure to payalimony. His
hearing comes up Friday in Wash-
ington. He has resisted returning to
Ann Arbor, where the divorce was
granted, fbr five months.
Attempts to settle the case out of
court have proved unsuccessful.
LAST DAY TODAY
heWas All in Clove
Was Feeling HIS Oats/
-1 r
Bdr

HIGH ABOVE HUDSON'S WATERS - Carol G. Warren, one of the
crew of 60 men painting the George Washington bridge over the Hud-
son River between Manhattan and New Jersey, walks up one of the
bridge cables. The job, which will cost $400,000, will take four years
to complete.
RECOMMENDS UN ACTION:
Prof. Slosson Terms British
Pales tine Proposal Inadequnate

-aL-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

e
.._..

,.

Nll

CLASSIFIED
DIR ECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
EVERSHARP PENCIL: Black and
gold plate. Sentimental value. Re-
turn to J. E. King, Rm. 4300A, E.
Engr. Bldg. Reward. (13
WANTED
WANTED: Passenger to share driv-
ing aneI expenses to San Francisco.
August. References exchanged. Box
52, Mich. Daily. (1
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Car to buy outright or
hire from August to September.
Apply Dadachanji, 921 South State
or phone 2-4634. (9
MISCELLANEOUS
WILL TRADE 4 single $1.20 seats for
"Angel Street" Thursday night for
4 together or 2 pairs anywhere in
house. Leave word for Virginia at
4759. (12
PLAN for your fall suits and formals
now. Expert workmanship on cus-
,om-made clothes and alterations.
Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669. (10
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A
better price paid. Sam's Store. 122
E. Washington St. (4
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Zeiss-Ikon portrait cam-
era, 1:6.3, size 9 by 12 cm. Includes
pack adapter, viewer, film. Call
C. E. Boston, 8232 after 7 p.m. (12
FOR SALE: Three-speed Schwinn
man's bicycle, excellent condition.
inquire at Apt. 7, Veterans' Hous-
ing Project, Hill and Fifth, after-
noon or evening. (11

Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Summer Ses-
sion, Room 1213 Angell Hall by 3:30 p.m.
on the day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 206
Notices
Notice to Faculty and Veterans:
Requisitions for Veterans' books and
supplies will be honored only through
Wednesday, July 31, for Summer
Session.
Veterans' Wives' Club will not
meet during the remaining summer
months. The next meeting will be
on October 7.
All Veterans enrolled in the Univer-
sity under Public Law 16 or 346 who
are not receiving subsistence allow-
ance are requested to report to Rm.
100 Rackham Building Monday, Aug-
ust 5, between the hours of 8:30 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., so that action can be
taken to expedite payment of sub-
sistence due.
Mr. Scallan of Proctor and Gamble
will be at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 201 Mason Hall, on Friday,
August 5, to interview any young
men who are interested in sales work.
Call extension 371 for an appoint-
ment.
The fourth clinic will be held at
the Fresh Air Camp Friday, August 2,
at 8:00 p.m. The visiting consultants
will be Dr. Wilma Donahue, Director
of the Psychological Clinic and Mrs.
Margaret Pintler, Chief Psychologist
in charge of the childrens' division
of the Psychological Clinic.
Lectures
There will be a lecture by Sumner
H. Slichter, Professor of Economics,
Harvard University, on Wednesday,
July 31 at 4:10 p.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheatre. The topic will be
"Economic Changes Produced by
Modern Technology."
The public is invited to attend.
Professor Slichter's lecture was
changed from August 13 to July 31.
Professor Eugene A. Nida of the

Summer Institute of Linguistics at
the University of Oklahoma, will lec-
ture on Wednesday, July 31, at 7:30
p.m., at the Rackham Amphitheatre.
The topic will be, "Systems of For-
mal Syntactic Structure." This lec-
ture is under the auspices of the
Linguistic Institute of the University
of Michigan, and the public is in-
vited to attend.
The regular meeting of the Uni-
versity Women Veterans Association
will be held at 7:00 Monday evening,
August 5, at the Michigan League.
A discussion of the coming year's
activities will be held, and all inter-
ested service women are urged to at-
tend.
Forum: The Unrest in Palestine:
A lecture and discussion, led by the
Rev. Bernard Heller, Ph.D., author
of "The Odyssey of A Faith," former-
ly will Hillel Foundation, in the
Rackham Amphitheatre, Sunday,
August 4, at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture: "Problems of Exceptional
Children below Six Years of Age."
John Lee, Dean of the Graduate
School, Wayne University. Wednes-
day, July 31, at 3:00 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Lecture: "Homeostasis and the Ed-
ucational Process." Willard C. Ol-
son, Professor of Education. Wed-
nesday, July 31, at 4:05 p.m., Uni-
versity High School Auditorium.

There will be a lecture by G. Max
Wingo, Assistant Professor of Edu-
cation on Thursday, August 1 at 4:05
p.m. in the University High School
Auditorium. The topic will be "The
Fundamental Working Idea of the
Activity School."
There will be a lecture by Howard'
B. Lewis, Professor of Biological
Chemistry on Thursday, August 1 at
4:10 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre. The topic will be "Nutri-
tion."
Linguistic Institute Luncheon Lec-
turer for this week, Mr. Douglas Rae
Taylor, will speak on "The Creole
Language of Dominica," in Rm. 308
of the Michigan Union, at 1:00 p.m.,
Thursday, August 1. The public is
cordially invited.
(Continued on Page 4)
Today and Thursday
DIARY OF A CHAMBERMAID
with Paulette Goddard
Burgess Meredith, Hurd Hatfield
and
STRANGE IMPERSONATION
with Brenda Marshall
Willima Gargan

Referring to Britain's recent prob-
lems in Palestine and India, Prof.
Preston W. Slosson, of the historya
department, said that "there's one
sure remedy for a headache and
that's decapitation."
Speaking in his regular Tuesday
afternoon lectures on current events,
Prof. Slosson pointed out that Brit-
ain is unable to use this method
because she is bound to her respon-
sibililies after having assumed them.
Eiven if Britain did leave, the basic
problem of war in India and Pales-
tine, would still remain.
The latest British proposal for the
settlement of the Palestinian prob-
lem, one which divides the country
up into three parts, the Trans-Jordan
for the Arabs, Jerusalem for the
British, and a northwestern area, nat
larger than Rhode Island, for the
Jews, had the unusual effect of unit-
ing the Arabs and the Jews in a
joint denunciation, Prof. Slosson said.
The essence of Britain's difficulty
in India, he declared, is that the
Hindu majority wants a united In-
dia, while the Moslem League, the
most articulate, if not the most repre-
sentative of the Moslem minority, de-
mands Pakistan, a separate Moslem
state.
This seems to present a hopeless
picture, but it has its own remedies,
stated Prof. Slosson. He suggested
that the problem be handed over to
the United Nations Organization for
a solution which Britain alone could
not find.
The enormous omission on the pre-
sent Paris Peace Conference agenda,
Prof. Slosson said, is the outlining
of the treaties with Germany and
NotthMain Opposite Court House

!r ctwrc i0tmOdern G

Japan. The United States has pro-
posed an economic merger with any
and all of the occupational forces
in Germany. This has met with ap-
proval by the British, approval with
reservations from the French, and
no answer from the Russians. The
greatest difficulty in the decision of
Germany's future, declared Prof.
Slosson arises not from misgovern-
ment, but from four different types
of government which amount to mis-
government.

~~i~~ii1

r4
! M U w -.ate _!

Ending Today

I

y FROM
oson in
Kathryn GRAYSON
June ALLYSON
With Lourix: Melchior
___- Thursday-
"A YANK IN LONDON"

Extra !
JAN SAV I
Cartoo

ITT and BARD
Dn -News

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It

STARTS TODAY

SMILEY BURNETTE IN
"TWO FISTED STRANGER"

- Thursday
Sronge Love
JOHN HIJIAK,
NANCY GUILD
with
*ly Nol"n 'Rich 'd Cote r "

Plus

TOM NEAL IN
"BLONDE ALIBI"

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.

The University Musical- Society Presents

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and

BAB

1

IN RECITAL FOR TWO PIANOS

TN

RS.,

6.pIe8

. .... .

ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
HEART OF THE NATION
with .
RAIMU,- MICHELE MORGAN
- ~ * ' 1 1 T

1

8:30 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

lasaiamm

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