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July 25, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUU

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a 1115 lilloTHE IIIC HIi 111 pAlI11

THEATRE DIRECTOR:
Ivard Strauss Will Address
Speech Department Assembly
Ivard Strauss, director of the Try-Out Theatre, Seattle, Wash., and
visiting staff-member of the department of speech, will be the speaker at a
department assembly at 4 p. im. EWT (3 p. m. CWT) today at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Strauss has been a designer, technical advisor and producing di-
rector for the Try-Out Theatre and is a member of its founding board ofI
directors. He has also been affiliated

i

HIGHLIGHTS
ON CAMPUS

Better Schools Discussed by Education Conference This Week

- I

Films To Be Shown

0 0

Viner..."

with the New England ConservatoryI

(Continued from Page 11)

though both were excellent sets of
resolutions. "The whole meaning of
these documents will be disclosed
by what will happen," he concluded.
The major problems of world eco-
nomic cooperation as listed by Prof.
Viner were the reduction, and elimi-
nation in some cases, of trade bar-
riers, stimulating a healthy flow of
capital, easing of mass unemployment
and of depressions, the regulation of
monopolies, the development of back-
ward areas, and providing access to
raw materials.
He stated that the United States
was taking the lead in the reduc-
tion of world trade barriers by
concluding bi-lateral agreements,
but claimed that reduction of bar-
riers was too slow in relation to the
dimensions of the problem.
Prof. Viner's suggestion to reduce
world unemployment would be the
establishment of an International
Fund with a stabilization fund of
30 or 40 billions.
BOOKBINDING BY HAND
adds a pleasing touch of individuality
to your library. Thesis bound over
night. Free estimates, pick-up and de-
livery.
HARALDdOLSEN, Bookbinder
815 Brookwood - - =~ Phone 2-291 5

The Art Cinema League will pres-
ent a private showing of surrealist
films at 8:30 p. m. EWT (7:30 p. m.'
CWT) tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The three shorts produced in Hol-
lywood are entitled "Meshes of the
Afternoon," "An Experimentation in
Choreography," and "On Land."
The movies are symbolic, mixing
reality with the world of fantasy
and dreams. Individual interpreta-
tion is wide and the films are a new
approach to cinematographic crea-
tion and art form.
Although this showing is on an
invitational basis, a limited number
of invitations have been left open
to the public. Those interested in
surrealist art, new techniques of
photography, and movie production
should call Herbert Otto, Art Cinema
League manager, between 12 noon
and 1 p. m. (11 a. m. and noon CWT)
EWT today at 2-2218 for admittance.
Muaoz To Give Tclk* ,
Jose Ampaio Muaoz will give a
talk on Guatemala before a meet-
ing of La Sociedad Hispanica at 3
p. m. EWT (7 p. m. CWT) today in
Rm. 316 of the Michigan Union.
Muaoz is a doctor of medicine,
studying English at the Linguistic
Institute of the University.
* * *

IVARD STRAUSS
. . . To address speech department
assembly.
of Music, and the New England
Chamber Opera, both in Boston..
He has worked with the Duluth
Summer School of Theatre, the Uni-
versities of Washington and Seattle,
and at Roosevelt High School, Seat-
tle.
Strauss, who holds B. S. and M. S.
degrees in Education from Boston
University, is the author of "Paint,
Powder and Make-up," a textbook on
theatre make-up, and several arti-
zles on educational theatre.

The Sixteenth Annual Summer Education Conference, held under the
auspices of the School of Education, opened Monday and will continue
through Friday.
Theme for the Conference, whose director is Dean James B. Edmonson
of the School of Education, is "Paths to Better Schools," the title of the
1945 yearbook of the American Association of School Administrators.
Topics to be taken up in the Conference will be concerned with educa-
tional reorganization, health education, music, and professional problems
of teachers. In addition to several evening programs which have been
arranged, the Conference is twice daily holding regular lectures at 11 a. in.
EWT (10 a. m. CWT) and 2 p. m., * * *
EWT (1 p. m. CWT). 'I-
Michigan representatives of vari- rowv Lectures
ous publishing companies have pre-
pared an extensive exhibit of new
textbooks and other instructional '
materials to be shown during the
conference. A special exhibit has "Teaching may be included among
also been provided by the University the professions, but it still has some
Library Extension Service. distance to go to qualify without res-
All programs of the Education ervations," Prof. William C. Trow of
Conference week will be open with- the education school stated in a lec-
out charge, and visitors are welcome ture Monday afternoon to the Six-
to attend. teenth Annual Summer Education
__------__-_Conference.
IA IY OFF CIA Educational institutions have in
DAILY OFFICIAL recent years done a good jol in
E "building up a~backround of pro-
ULLETi INfessional knuw ledge, Prof. Trow
asserted, but for the technical
skills that contribute to making a
(Continued from Page 2) teacher a really effective profes-
sional worker they have relied too
evening, July 31, 7:30 p. m. (CWT), heavily on experience and in-ser-
in Pattengill Auditorium of the Ann vice training. That is valuable,
Arbor High School. Captain Mc- Prof. Trow said, but it is an injus-
Closky will present compositions by tice to the communities to send out
Beethoven, Schumann and Mahler. teachers who are impractical the-
The public is cordially invited. orists with little or no mastery of
the techniques of the profession.
Exhibitions Prof. Trow believes that the em-
phasis on research, manifested in the
Clements Library. Japan in Maps master's thesis, is a poor substitute
from Columbus to Perry (1492-1854). for adequate professional training.
ArchitecMture Building. Student ost people, he said, who supposedly
Archtecure uiling.Stuentare being trained to do research are
work,-consequently not qualified for the
Michigan Historical Collections, complex type of investigations that
160 Rackham Building. The Uni- are necessary if adequate solutions
versity of Michigan in the war, to educational problems are to be
________found.
Museums Building, rotunda. Some Emphasizing the need for more
foods of the American Indian.thnasilwhtenquPrf
General Library, main corridor Trow stated that the judgment
cases. Early military science selec- needed for diagnosis of pupils' dif-
tion from the Stephen Spaulding, '27, ficulties, for their prognosis, and
memorial collection, presented by Col. for their treatment calls for a
T. M Spaulding, '02ebhigher level of competence, as does
learning to evaluate the program.
Events Today being employed.
If these items are considered for
Dr. Mischa Titiev, Associate Pro- qualification. Prof. Tow said, ac-
fessor of Anthropology, will speak quaintance with research sources ,
this afternoon at 3:10 (CWT) or 4:10 profe ional techniques, and profes-
(EWT) in the Amphitheatre of the sional judgment, failure on any one
Rackham Building. His topic will item should disqualify a teacher for
be "ThenProblem of Inter-racial Co- admission to the professional cate-
operation." The public is invited, gory, but weakness at any one point
.-- should not. In a school for profes-
Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, Presi- sional training, he said, neglect or
dent of the University, will speak over emphasis of one or more of
this evening at 7:15 (CWT) or 8:15 these criteria should be avoided.
(EWT) in the Lecture Hall of the
Rackham Building. His subject will
be "Problems of Educational Co-op- INVEST IN VICTORY
eration.

'I

Anderson Asks
School Revision
"School children must be taught
the many symbols which permeate
our 20th century culture or all teach-
ing will be sterile," Dr. G.L.Anderson,
professor of education at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, said yesterday
at the 16th Annual University Sum-
mer Education Conference.
"The child who learns to read is
acquiring the process of making blots
of ink on a white page mean some-
thing. The learning of arithmetic is
essentially nothing but a process of
understanding the number system,"
Dr. Anderson pointed out.
Make Concepts Meaningful
"Therefore, the social ntudies must
make such concepts as democracy,
justice, nation, frontier, constitution,
and tolerance, meaningful," he stat-
ed.
Dr. Anderson gave this example of
the "meaning" of education:
"A child who learns that H2SO4 is

I

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1 16

I

Hillel To Hold Picnic

sulphuric acid may still unconcerned-
ly spill it on his-clothes. But to learn
the destructive powers of sulphuric
acid through direct experience makes
the child aware of all acids in the fu-
ture."
Admitting that all understandings
cannot be developed through direct
experience, Dr. Anderson praised the
work of audio-visual aids and sug-
gested that the printed word more
often be considered the aid to audio
or visual material, rather than the
end itself.
Repetitive Drill Useless
"Associations learned through re-
petetive drill without meaning are
virtually useless," Dr. Anderson said.
"Pupils educated in such schools of-
ten give glib answers without aware-
ness of their significance or mean-
ing."
MOSELEY TYPEWRITER CO.
114 So. 4th Ave. Phone 5888
TYPEWRITERS AVAILABLE
Order now for early delivery

0 0f

t's part of a Modern Education
CERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS AND PLANES
AVAILABLE AT ALL TIMES
ENROLL NOW IN OUR LOW-COST CLUB PLAN
Gridley Flying Service
(Formerly Ann Arbor Aircraft Co.)
ANN ARBOR AIRPORT
Phone 25-8825 4320 S. State St.
VISITORS ARE WELCOME
Yi

A picnic will be held by the Hillel
Foundation Sunday at the Saline Val-
ley Farms.
Swimming, volley ball, and baseball
are to be offered as recreation, and
lunch and transportation will be pro-
vided. Cars will leave the Founda-
tion at 11 a. m. EWT (10 a. m. CWT)
and will return by 6 p. m. EWT.
Reservations must be made by Fri-
day. 'Phone the Foundation at 2-6585.
* * *
Center To Hold Dane ...
The bi-weekly tea dances at the
International Center will be re-
sumed for the summer term with a
dance to be held from. 4 to 6 p. m.
EWT (3 to 5 p. m. CWT) Friday at
the International Center.
Foreign students and their Am-
erican friends are invited.
* * *

"MAN
ON THE STREET"~
12:45-1:00 P.M.
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY
broadcast from
Main and Washington Streets.
Tune in or come down
and participate.
1050 VADA 1050
KilocyCles locycles

14

1'

1

IAS To Meet Today

0 0 0

"Some Design Problems in Engi-
neering" will be discussed by Arthur
R. Lambert, Chief Project Engineer
of Stinson Aircraft, at a meeting of
the Institute of the Aeronautical Sci-
ences at 7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30 p. m.
CWT) today in Room 305 of the
Union.
After the lecture, members will
hold a business meeting, elect a
faculty adviser, and plan a dance.

V
F

j
I'
s I

CLUES
fOr
6cc/ei

DRESSES

tA,

I

Club To Hear Payro .

-0

0 .. i4e

theie

Stockiugless?
use Bellin's
lionderstoen!t
the dry method
hair eraser.
for smoother,
more beautiful
legs;
F F'w"

N
{ ' !
: z #j
, 3., ,
fi Y
p $ ?

-

.._ ..

L..

COSMETIC CLEARANCE
-here are bargains in top-brands of HA'D
LOTION, COLD CREAM, COLOGNES, LEG
MAKE-UP, FACE POWDER and LIPSTICK. All
selling at lower sale prices.

"Paul Gauguin," modern French
impressionist painter, will be dis-
cussed by Julio Payro, Argentine
art critic and, at present, an in-
structor in the fine arts department,
before a meeting of the French
Club at 8 p. m. EWT (7 p. m.
CWT) tomorrow in Alumni Mem-
orial Hall.
Payro is the recipient of a State
Department Travel and Mainten-
ance Award and has toured sev-
eral American cities, viewing the
more famous art museums and
collections. He has written several
volumes on the history of both
classical and contemporary art. At
the present time he is conducting
courses in the history of contem-
porary French and Argentine art.
Payro will illustrate his talk with
slides. Following the lecture, there
will be a social hour in the grill
room of the League.
Somerset Maugham's novel,
"Moonand Sixpence," is based on
the life of Paul Gauguin.

at July
Clearance Sale
Prices

Here's the perfect
hair remover for
stockingless legs!
Wonderstoen easily and
completely erases hair,
and smooths your skin
at the same time.
Wonderstoen's a dry;
rosy disc that can't
out the skin,*spill'or,
stain. Leaves ,no odor
. no stubble.4One'
Wonderstoen gives you a
whole season of hair-free;
lovel1ier skinUsz

DRESSES

for every

possible

summer occasion, whether you
are furloughing with that sol-
dier husband or just staying
at home - you're sure to find
the dress you want at the price
you want to pay.

1'.

RYq"4h"If -
Make . your stop at the
CALKINS-FLETCHER foun-
tain a regular date every
afternoon - cool refresh-
ments served in a friendly
atmosphere.

< t
4y 7
{
' ' f''
(/ '
. - 1
-,

4porty stationery

PARE NTS
Help your daughter
to win security
Your daughter of high school gradu-
ation age has known only the extra-
ordinary wartime employment situa-
tion, when most anyone can get a
job at big pay.
But YOU recall the pre-war days
when special training was necessary
to get a good job and hold it.
The time is fast approaching when
employers will again be exacting in
their requirements. You can protect
your daughter's future by making
sure that she is equipped with spe-
cialized training to meet post-war
competition.
A few months spent in Hamilton
Business College will qualify her for
a better and more secure position.
It will lift her above untrained com-
petition. It will entitle her to the
assistance of our Placement Depart-
ment, throughout here career.
NEW STUDENTS MAY BEGIN
ANY MONDAY.

DRESSES ... $14.95
Includes prints and solids in crepes, jerseys, meshes, and
sheers - Originally priced to $22.95.
Junior, Misses', and Women's sizes - some half-sizes, too.

I

/

- writing becomes a distinct pleasure
when you use handsome HUNTINGTON
STATIONERY. Reasonably priced at
only 89 cents a box.

SUITS ... $14. 95
Summer Gabs, Strutters, and
Butcher Linens. Sizes 9-18.
DRESSES
Cottons and spun rayons-
Playsuits and Slacks.
$7.00 and $10.00

Summer Sheers
HAND-PAINTED
WITH
LE G M AKE-UP

COATS
Includes Shorties, Chester-
fields, and Boxies - whites,
pastels, and dark.
16.95 - 22.50 - 29.95
ACCESSORIES
Odds and Ends in Blouses,
Skirts, Summer Bags, and
Sweaters - at Reductions to
f of Original Prices

I

2__

Your legs .. . coolly covered!I ..:we'aring the
new, improved stockings you pour from a
bottle!I Rozino Backy's waterproof leg make-
up ... easier than ever to apply . . gives a
sheer took...-a flattering dull finish. Really
beneficial to the skin'.''won't rub off... covers
blemishes. In sunit or sundark.
.11.00e~

I I

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