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July 21, 1945 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-07-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Gridders Continue Drill
Despite Summer Heat
All Berths Are Wide Open to Contenders With
Opening Game Less Than Two Months Off

Under a broiling hot sun, Michi-
gan's 1945 gridiron squad closed its
third week of the current summer
practice session yesterday, with the
emphasis still being placed upon of-
fense.
Head Coach "Fritz" Crisler stated
that the heat would have nothing to
do with the intensity with which
these summer drills are pursued. He
and his assistants have made good
this promise, as is witnessed by the
fact that the boys have been work-
ing out just as hard, if not harder,
than before. Along with the offensive
tactics, speed is the keynote of the
present sessions.
The possibility of picking a
starting' eleven, for the initial
game of the season with Great
Lakes on September 15, is very un-
certain at the present time. This is
due to the fact that candidates for
the line are waging a closely fought
battle for first string assignments.
At present, there are twelve pros-
pects who deserve an equal amount
of praise. Standouts at the mo-
ment are letterman Harold Watts,
filling his last year's role at -cen-
ter; Dom Tomasi, freshman regu-
lar second baseman on the Wolver-
ine nine, from Flint Central, con-
+' 4ctn LCK e. madm IernG O _
Ending Today
THE A AL
gp MILIO
RAD FN
ARE WAITN
FOR-

tinuing to fill the guard position
admirably; John Lintol, holdover
center, who is now working out at
the other guard slot, having been
switched from tackle; and Gene
Hinton, a 240 pound tackle from
Drumright, Oklahoma.
In the backfield the picture is a
little clearer. The quarterback post
is satisfactorily filled by Captain Joe
Ponsetto and Howard Yerges, last
year's second string signal caller.
Leading the field in the halfback de-
partment are Henry Fonde, a sprint-
er on last spring's track team.; Pete
Elliott, brother of Purdue's star back
"Bump" Elliott, a better than fair
passer and runner; and Warren
Bentz, pole vaulter on the track
squad. Join Foltz, George Chiames,
and Dick Davis are the most impres-
sive candidates for first string full-
back.
Practice consisted of drills on pass-
ing, basic running plays, and offen-
sive blocking with much stress be-
ing placed upon speed. The Blue, or
Varsity, squad, then took the offense
against the Whites in a scrimmage,
which ended the afternoon's work.
Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

SPORTS
NEWS+VIEWS+ COMMENT
By BILL MULILENIiORE, Daily Sports Editor
Gundar Haegg runs a 4:01.6 mile over in Sweden, and the perennial
question of the possibility of a four-minute mile rises once more to puzzle'
the experts.
As far as we are concerned, the four-minute mile is no more impossible
than was the 15-foot pole vault, the :9.5 100-yard dash, or any of the
other supposedly "perfect" track and field performances, perfect, that is,
until someone bettered them. As in most sports, the record sights have
had to be raised continually over the years as improvements in equipment
and technique made ever better marks possible.
For some reason, the four-minute mile has captured the fancy
of the public more than most such speculations. Scientists have
"proved" it impossible, but nevertheless the mark has been pushed ever
lower until now it seems that the legendary figure may be iust around
the corner. For in a race such as the mile, a mere one and six-tenths
seconds does not mean a great deal.
As a matter of fact, either Haegg or Arne Anderson, who finished
but two steps behind the Flying Swede, might have achieved four minutes
flat the other day but for an accident. Anderson was forced to run the
last 600 yards with a piece of metal in his shoe and limped over the last
lap. Had Anderson been able to push Haegg to the limit, one or the other
might very possibly have broken the tape in four minutes-or less.
We talked to Michigan track coach Ken Doherty once about this
four-minute mile business, and he agreed with our view that it was not
only possible but probable, given time and the proper conditions. His
view was that under perfect conditions of athletes, competition, weather,
track, and the other variables inherent in running, either Haegg or Ander-
son would turn the trick. And Doherty, one of the best track coaches
in the business, should know what he is talking about.
In line with Haegg's recent performance, track fans are wondering
at the apparent paradox of The Wonder's recent American tour, when
he had considerable difficulty running under 4:12. The extreme differ-
ence in times would seem to reflect the importance of the factors men-
tinned above.
Haegg, obviously, was not in the best of condition. He was running
in an unfamiliar climate over board tracks, and the strangeness of the sur-
roundings undoubtedly had something to do with his mediocre efforts.
And, finally, America at the present time has no miler capable of pushing
Haegg to anything reasonably close to a four-minute mile. Thus, while
his tour was disappointing, it apparently didn't mean that Haegg had
slipped as some people were claiming.
Dodgers Lead Chicago 10-4 in
U nf inishedit;Walker Stars

Browns Edge
Yanks In Two;
Red Sox Lose
Pittsburgh Wallops
Giants And Voiselle;
Gains Fourth Place
NEW YORK, July 20 --(A)- The
American League Champion A. Louis
Browns moved right into the Ameri-
can League pennant race today by
sweeping a double header from the
New York Yankees at Yankee Sta-
dium, 4-3 and 3-2.
Luke Sewell's forces came from be-
hind in both games, with home run
wallops accounting for both victor-
ies. In the opener, pitcher Sig Ja-
kucki homered with one on to dead-
lock the game at 2-2 and after the
Yankees went ahead 3-2, Boris Mar-
tin slammed another round tripper
with one on in the seventh to give
the Browns the game.
Behind 2-0 in the nightcap, St.
Louis tallied single runs in the fifth
and sixth to tie the game and won
out in the eighth without the aid of
a base hit. Milt Byrnes accounted
for the first Brownie score with a
homer. Al Hollingsworth pitched a
seven-hitter to win the nightcap,
after Jakucki had annexed his 10th
triumph in the opener. Allen Gettel
and Floyd Bevens were the losers.
The Boston Red Sox missed an op-
portunity to tie the Yankees by bow-
ing to the Chicago White Sox 6-3.
Clem Hausmann's wildness in the
third inning gave the Chisox five
runs. Ed Lopat won his sixth game
for the Dykesmen.
Pittsburgh moved into fourth place
in the National League displacing
the New York Giants whom they beat
13-5. The Pirates overcame a five-
run deficit, by knocking Bill Voiselle
from the mound with a six run rally
in the sixth frame.
Detroit and Washington were en-
gaged in a twilight-night twin tussle
as were the Indians and Athletics.
Cincinnati, Boston, St. Louis and
Philadelphia in the National League
were rot scheduled.
CLASSIFIED
DIBEACTOBV

Six Ex-Servicemen
On Football Squadt
During America's first two or threeR
years in the war, the source of play-
ers for any collegiate, professional,i
or amateur sport was limited to eith-
er 4F's, 17 year olds, Marine and
Navy trainees, or overage veterans.
Now a new class of ball player has
appeared to considerably brightenI
the future of sports in general. This
source of material is the discharged]
service veteran. Among the more
notable stars who have returned from]
the armed forces are: Hank Green-1
berg, Detroit's ace run and hit pro-
ducer; Paul Sarringhaus, Ohio State's
leading ground gainer 'in 1942; Red
Cochrane, former lighteweight box-
ing champ; and Sam Byrd, golfing
star.
Consequently, when one looks at
the list of candidates for the 1945
Michigan football squad, he discov-
ers the names of a few veterans of
World War II. The number is com-
paratively small, but it is indicative
of the important role this group will
be playing in the future sporting
world. Out of the 102 men reporting
for practice, six are dischargees while

54 others are civilian freshmen or
otherwise exempt from military ser-
vice. Of these six, at least two are
assured positions on the Blue, or var-
sity, squad, while one is in line for a
first string berth.
Heading the list of veterans is
Bob Callahan 21 year-old line pros-
pect. The five foot eleven inch 190
pounder received a medical discharge
from the Marine Corps after 19
monthsof service as a combat in-
structor at San Diego. Bob, who
played center for the University of
Missouri one year, started at the
pivot post for the Wolverines at the
beginning of the current practice ses-
sion. He was then shifted to guard
and, .upon returning to practice next
week after recovering from a tonsil-
lectomy, he will be given a chance to
prove his worth at tackle.
The other member of the Blue
squad is Kermit Schaffer, a back-
field prospect from Indiana. The re-
maining veterans are, at present, on
the White, or Junior Varsity, squad.
However, the prospects for their ad-
vancing to the Varsity are not too
improbable. From the Army has come
Leon Elan, a 168 pound five foot nine
inch fullback prospect and Phil Smith
a guard.

Returning War Veterans Form
New Source of Athletic Talent

.-.-,.-.- r

SPECIAL MATINEE

TEAMS
x-Chicago ........
St. Louis .........
x-Brooklyn ......
Pittsburgh......
New York .......
Boston. .. .......
Cincinnati .......
Philadelphia.

W
.50
.48
47
.43
.45
.40'
,38
.24

L
31
36
37
41
43
42
40
65

Pet.
.617
.571
.560
.512
.511
.488
.487
.270

GB
81/2
81/
10'2
10%1
30

"The Male mM"Animal
By James Thurber and Elliott Nugent
TODAY ...2:30 P.M.
Tickets $1.02, 78c, 54c (tax included)
The Michigan Repertory Players - Department of Speech
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

.,
AAR,
y
r
0
RELEASED
TNRU O
y, UNITED'
ARTISTS

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 13, New York 5.
Brooklyn at Chicago, called at
end of eighth inning with Brook-
lyn leading, 10 to 4. Will be com-
pleted at later date.
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Chicago.
Brooklyn at St. Louis, night.
Boston at Pittsburgh (2).
.New Y'ork at Cincinnati.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

~b ppi" uce4,bbrieA

_. !

TEAMS W
xx-Detroit .......46
xx-Washington ...40
New York ........41
Boston ...........42
Chicago ..........42
St. Louis........39
xx-Cleveland .....37
xx-Philadelphia . .26

L
32
36
38
39
40
38
39
51

Pet.
.590
.526
.519
.519
.512
.512
.487
.338

GB
5
51/
5%/
5
61/
8
18%/

xx-Does not include twi-night
twin bills.
FRIDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 4-3, New York 3-2.
Chicago 6, Boston 3.
Detroit at Washington, incom-
plete.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, incom-
plete.
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Philadelphia.
Cleveland at Washington.
Chicago at New York.
St. Louis at Boston.

Incomplete Game to
Be Continued in Fall
CHICAGO, July 20 -(P)-- The
Brooklyn Dodgers, paced by Dixie
Walker's five runs-batted-in today
led the first-place Chicago Cubs 10-4
in a game suspended at the end of
the eighth to permit the Brooks to
catch a day-coach train for St. Louis.
The game will be finished Sept. 15,
NIGHT GAMES
(First Game)
Detroit .......010 200 004-3 8 1
Washington . .210 100 00x-4 14 0
overmire, Trout (4) and Swift;
Leonard and Ferrell.
(First Game)
Cleveland ......110 000 001-3 9 3
Philadelphia .. .100 105 01x-8 8 2
Reynolds, Henry (6) Salveson
(7) and Hayes; Flores, Berry (7)
and Rosar.

when the Dodgers make their next
Wrigley Field appearance.
Walker's homer and two singles
paced Brooklyn's 13-hit assault on
four Bruin tossers. The Dodgers
bunched five hits, including triples
by Stan Bordagaray and Ed Basin-
ski, in their six-run fifth which broke
a 1-1 deadlock.
Starter Seats got in trouble in the
fifth when he isued four passes and
walked across two Cub runs. He was
relieved by Buker, who got Andy
Pafko to ground out with the bases
loaded and two out. In the next
three innings, Buker allowed two
hits, one an eighth-inning triple by
Mickey Livingstone.
The Dodgers had one hour to
change and catch their St. Louis
train.
Brooklyn 010 060 03-10 13 2
Chicago 000 120 01- 4 5 1
Seats, Buker and Sandlock; Pas-
seau, Erickson, Chipman, Starr,
and Livingstone.

Last Day Continuous
"EARL CARROLL from 1 P.M. COOL!
VANITIES"

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

FOR RENT
LIVE BETTER permanently in
PITTSFIELD VILLAGE. You'll get
more out of life - in this permanent
community of 422 apartment homes,
privately owned and managed, that
offers country life with city conven-
iences. On Washtenaw Road, be-
tween Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti.
Parks, playgrounds, school. One-story
2-level arrangements save steps.
Elect. refrig., gas stove, two bed-
rooms. $52-$62 mo., unfurnished.
Model apartment open daily 9 to 6
and Sunday 3 to 6; or phone Ann
Arbor 2-6553.
WANTED
WANTED: To rent a music studio
evenings for an hour after 6:30,
weekdays. Call 5627 after 6.
-HELP WANTED
MEN: The hospital needs you. Janit-
ors, orderlies, and wall washers are
needed. Part time orderly positions
available in evening. Apply person-
nel office, Room 1022, Univ. Hosp.
STUDENT HELP WANTED in din-
ing room at Pinafore. Meals or
cash. Call 6737.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Exn nsive fountain pen on
campus Tnursday, July 19. Call
Pat Albin 2-2228.
LOST: Gold Marine bracelet. Re-
ward. Call Renee Kaire, 2-3225.
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD FOR SUMMER TERM
available at 816 Forest. Good food,
all meals. Call 5974.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Man's English bicycle,
pre-war, practically new. Call 3-
542 between 10 a. m. and 5 p. m.
BUY MORE BONDS

w

a

Starts Sunday

SAT., JULY 2f~ 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00-News.
7:05--Morning Round-up.
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
7:30--Musical Reveille
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30--Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
9:05--Music Box.
9:30-Community Calendar
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-David Rose & Orch.
10:15-What Do You Know.
10 :30--Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Kiddies Party.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.

12:00--News.
12:15--Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Merle Pitt.
12:25-College & Martial
Airs.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Luncheon Melodies.
1:00-News.
1:05--Salon Music.
1:10-Dick Gilbert.
1:15--U. of M.
1:30--Mitch Ayres.
1:45--Phil Hanna.
1:55-Today's Hit Tune.
2 :00-News.
V:05- John Kirby.
2:15-Jerry Wald. ......
.2:45--Baseball Brevities.
2:55-Baseball (Det. at
Phila.)>
4:00-News.
4:05-Jan Hubati.
4:30-Ranch Boys & Betty
Lou.

4:45--Misch Borr.
5 :00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10--Hollywood Reporter.
5:15-Hollywood Preview.
5:30-Rec. Room Rythms.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News,
6:15-Albert Wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes From Life.
6:55--Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Band of the Week.
7:30-Front Page Drama.
7:45--Dave Reed.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.'
8:15-Put & Take It.
8:30-Your American Mu-
sic.
9:00--News.
9:05--Woody Herman.

STAY0C0OL...
with Alexander de Markoff leg
make-up from the MADEMOI-
SELLE SHOP. No need for hose
when you can wear these rain-
resistant, quick drying liquid
stockings that won't wrinkle or
rub off.
, ,
EVERYONE'S
TALKING
- about the new shipment o1
Schiaparelli and Yardley col-
ognes, perfumes, and dusting
powd1er which arrived at CAL-
KINS & FLETCHER ... a vari-
ety of lovely scents can be had

SHOPPING. ..
For something really nice to
give her? A diamond ring from
EIBLER'S -is something any
woman would love to have. And
if it's an engagement ring you
want, there are many styles
from which to choose.
BUDGET
TROUBLE .. .?
You won't have any if you go
to the big July sale at the
ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP.
They're featuring a large ,as-
sortment of coats and suits, as
well as better dresses . .. all at
greatly reduced price.

I

MUSICAL
"You Hit

IN COLOR!
The Spot"

WORLD NEWS

f
7
a
f.

Coning!

"FLAME OF THE BARBARY COAST"

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ON SALE

4 -

- - - - -~ - -- -'~ ~

v-~- -i W ' -- -A

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BANK
for Freedom!

-- - -.. -

EARLY NEXT WEEK
The
eT' Ie4EhlIT

\>, ,-
P \
iI, )_

dnn A1,4i s

.. . ,-
_. yI

The Ann Arbor Bank offers sound con.
nections and a trustworthy well-equipped
nprsonnel to handle your banking affairs.

?ihent I Retauraht
RELAX in the cool comfo-t of the Allenel Din-
ing Room for dinners that give a lift to jaded
summer appetites. Delicious food, cordial serv-

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