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August 01, 1945 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-01

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M

ntra-Squad Game

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE
To Mark End of Grid Practice

Scrimmage Will Stress
Individual Development!
Assistant Coaches Take Over as Crisler
Leaves for Western Conference Meeting

Michigan's 1945 football squad
will wind up five weeks of intensive
practice Saturday with an intra-
squad game in the Stadium which
will test its progress during summer
drills.
As many men as possible will be
used in the game, according to Head
Coach H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler, who will
not be on hand for the scrimmage.
Individual rather than team devel-
opment will be emphasized, he point-
ed out, as the squad will not be di-
vided into separate units, but will
appear as varying combinations.
Cirisler Will Be Absent
In the absence of Crisler, who
leaves tomorrow to attend a Western
Conference coaches' and officials'
meeting in Evanston Friday and Sat-
urday, Line Coach "Biggie" Munn,
End Coach Bennie Oosterbaan, and
BackfieldCoach Earl Martineau will
be in charge of the squad. They will
be assisted by Art Valpey, who has
charge of the junior varsity.
Crisler explained that the speed
which was lacking among the top
candidates earlier in the summer is
in greater evidence now, and that the
game Saturday will be the first good
chance for the coaches to see the ex-
tent of the improvement.
Yesterday's practice emphasized
MOSELEY TYPEWRITER CO.
COMPLETE REPAIR AND
REBUILDING SERVICE

place-kicking for both field goals and
pcints after touchdown, with Capt.
Joe Ponsetto and Bob Callahan do-
ing the booting. Offensive drills
were stressed early in the afternoon,
and the top players lined up for a
scrimmage later.
Ott is Backfield Candidate
John Ott, Traverse Ciy halfback,
appeared among the leading back-
field candidates this week for the
first time. No other changes in per-
sonnel, however, have taken place
recently.
Saturday's game, which is open to
the public, will begin around 2:30 p.
m. EWT (1:30 p. m. CWT) and will
be free. Another intra-squad game
at the Stadium is scheduled for the
following Saturday, and will con-
clude summer practices.
Recent Heat Wave Helps
Get Hinton Into Condition
Gene Hinton, a candidate for a
tackle position on Michigan's 1945
football team, is probably the only
person in Ann Arbor who is thankful
for the recent heat wave.
Hinton, who reported for practice
last month carrying around some
260 pounds of avoirdupois, was or-
dered to reduce, but quick. Setting
his goal at 220 pounds, the big boy
from Drumright, Oklahoma, has come
within 15 pounds of his mark, thanks
to a combination of heat, diet, and
hard work.

SPOUTS s
NEWS + VIEWS + COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Daly Sports Editor
FIVE YEARS OF WAR have just about turned Major League baseball
upside down, in more ways than one. Besides the admitted deteriora-
tion in quality and the evident lack of first class teams in either circuit,
the war has produced another phenomenon that is becoming more pro-
nounced every day.
Traditionally speaking, the American League has always been known
as a hitters' paradise. By and large the sluggers tended to congregate in
the Junior Loop. Production of extra-base hits, fancy batting averages,
and large clusters of runs was the keynote of American League baseball.
The National League, on the other hand, has always been considered
a pitchers' league. Where the American Leaguers depended on their
heavy hitters to win ball games, their brothers in arms resorted to a
tighter, less offensive type of play with the emphasis on pitchers' battles
and strategy.'
ALL THAT, for the time being at least, has been reversed. This year it
is the National League that has produced the hitters, and the American
League, the pitchers. The Nationals are slugging as they have never
slugged before, pounding out hits and producing runs at a furious rate.
tOn the other side of the fence, the American Leaguers have found the
pitchers much tougher than the hitters. Never in recent years has the
National League produced so many slugfests or the American so many
close ball games.
Statistics over the first half of the season bear out the change
and suggest in some measure its completeness. The Chicago Cubs, Na-
tional League leaders at the moment, lead the loop in team batting with
a very respectable team batting average of .284. The Cubs have scored
441 runs in 89 games, making 872 hits, 195 of them for extra bases.
On the other hand the American League leading Detroit Tigers boast a
very puny .241 team mark for 85 games. The Bengals have pushed only
288 runs over the plate on 682 hits, 157 of them extra-base knocks. The
difference is readily apparent.
As a matter of fact, every National League club, including the peren-
nially futile Philadelphia Phillies, is hitting at a faster pace than the
Tigers. Six Senior Circuit outfits have done better at the plate than the
Boston Red Sox, who lead the American League in team batting with a
mark of .266. As a league, the National League is hitting a creditable .268
to the American League's .250.
fHE NATIONAL LEAGUE, as a league, has scored 3,446 runs on 6,816
hits, including 1,104 doubles, 211 triples, and 344 home runs. Com-
parably, the American League has scored 2,535 runs on 5,812 hits, including
869 doubles, 185 triples, and only 222 homers. The differences are great
enough to be significant.
Individual leaders in the various phases of battin-g also follow the
same trend. Tommy Holmes of the Boston Braves leads the National
League with a .371 average. Aging Tony Cuccinello of the Chicago
White Sox tops the Junior Circuit at .325. The gulf continues all the
way down to the lowliest batsman in each loop.
Dixie Walker has batted in 84 runs for the Brooklyn Dodgers to lead
his league in that department. Bob Johnson of the Boston Red Sox
enjoys the same distinction in the American League with a mere 55 RBI's.
Here again the difference shows up all the way down the list.
N THE MATTER of home runs thing's are a little closer. Holmes leads
the National League with 16, as compared to Vern Stephen's 14 in
the American. But total production in the American League has lagged
'way behind, as was previously pointed out.
Several factors may account for the difference. The American
League boasts superior pitching for one thing. The Nationals have
no trio of hurlers to match Dave Ferriss of the Red Sox, and Hal
Newhouser and Al Benton of the Detroit Tigers. Only four National
League pitchers have won ten games or more, while seven American
hurlers have done the trick. The American League moundsmen have
fewer earned runs, more strikeouts, fewer bases on balls, and, of course,
fewer runs scored and hits made off their offerings.
But pitching alone probably does not account for the difference com-
pletely. Apparently the effect of the draft has been to drain off American
League hitters and National League '>
pitchers and thus create this anom-I
alous situation. Perhaps after the
war, when these stars return to ac- CLA SSIFIE D
tion, the old equilibrium will come
back again. But the change has pro- IY
duced some interesting results, be ER
sides destroying for a time at least
an old tradition.

I Crisler Predicts Bright Future
For Returning War Veterans

HANK BOROWY
.. .now with NL leaders
Elliot Leads in Golf
Tournev With 76
Qualifying rounds in the True-
blood Cup tournament ended Sun-
day with 14 entrants making the
grade for the playoff matches, which
will end Aug. 26.
Low score in the preliminaries
went to Pete Elliot, Navy man who is
also a leading candidate for a back-
field birth on the grid squad. Elliot
shot a 76, while his closest competi-
tor, Hank Zimmerman, came through
with a 78.
Of the 14 qualifiers, only three
men, Elliot, Bob Wolford, and Keith
Harder, a basketball regular, are
Navy men. The other 11 entrants
are civilians.
One match per week is the quota
for each golfer, according to Golf
Coach Bill Barclay, who added that
every player is asked to contact the
Golf Course immediately in order to
obtain the phone number of his op-
ponent.
Elliot and Zimmerman drew a bye
in the first round, but the 12 other
qualifiers have been paired. In the
opening matches, Bob Schwartz will
meet Henry DeMarco, Alden Johnson
will play Wolford, King Weeman has
been paired with Bob Stuckwich,
Bob Springer will meet Harder, Har-
vy Hubar will tangle with A. W. Se-
gune, and George Koskinas will face
Gilbert Shubert.

Ex-servicementin postwar college as enthusias
athletics, even though battle-testedan rsm
veterans, will be as intense and en- any freshm
thusiastic in competition as today's War Has He
17-year-olds, in the opinion of H. O. If anythir
(Fritz) Crisler, athletic coach and experience 1-
head football coach at the Univer- terest and ke
sity of Michigan. Speaking
Crisler disagrees with some coach- coach belie
es and educators who believe that will be won
returning veterans, especially those on mistakes
who have undergone extensive com- More matu
bat duty, will have become cynical squads and x
or blase about "the old college try." make for i:
"Of course, the mock heroics are "The older
out for those fellows," Crisler said. on their toe,
"But they were out before the war, "the kind o:
anyway. I do believe, however, that may be grei
returning veterans will be real boost- work hard."
ers of college athletics and morale
builders rather than debunkers."
Veterans Well Represented VICTO
He pointed to his own 1945 summer Your hair
practice squad of 97 men as an ex- co (
ample. It contains 15 Marines, nine cut to y
of whom have seen SouthwestPa- Yr ha
cific service, 40 Navy athletes, several are our pr
of whom have seen Fleet service, and larity wit
four dischargees among the 42 civil- commend
ians. serve in
"There are veterans of Guadalcan- health ar
al, Tarawa, Saipan and Iwo Jima on The DA
our squad," said Crisler. "But you
can't tell them from the rest of the Off
boys. A bit more poised, perhaps, but

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11

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

TEAMS W
Detroit ...........51
New York ........47
**Washington 45
Boston ...........46
*Chicago .........44
*Cleveland ........43
St. Louis ..........42
**Philadelphia . .. .30

L
36
40
41
43
44
44
44
56

Pct.
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.540
.523
.517
.500
.494
.488
.349

GB

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512
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HELP WANTED
MEN: The hospital needs you. Janit-
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needed. Part time orderly positions
available in evening. Apply person-
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LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Dark green Eversharp pen
in front of Dental building. Call
4536 Stockwell.
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NATIONAL LEAGUE
TEAMS W L Pet. GB
Chicago ..........58 32 .644
Brooklyn .........53 39 .576 6
"St. Louis........54 40 .574 6
Pittsburgh.........49 46 .516 11
New York ........50 47 .515 111 !
**Cincinnati......41 47 .466 16
Boston ...........42 52 .447 18
Philadelphia......26 70 .271 35
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