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July 04, 1944 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JESSDAY, JULY 4, 1944

THE MICIGAN DAILY

PAGE

TEBDAY, JULY 4, 1944 PAGE

Coed Council Is fsked by Wow
Council To Continue Campus Work
Laundry, Cafeterias
Need Summer Help 7
War Council projects will continue
throughout the summer term, with
emphasis on alleviating the Univer-
sity's labor shortage, it was an-
pounced yesterday by Pat Coulter,r
'45, War Council president.
Summer plans have been an-
nounced by the personnel director,?
WAA president, and chairmen of'
Junior Girls Project, the Surgical
Dressings Unit, and the hospital pro- 9

ject.
Paid workers are needed at the
University Laundry, at the League,
and in the West Quadrangle cafe-
teria, according to Peg Weiss, per-
sonnel director, who also announced
that the proxy parent service would
be continued. Coeds may apply at the
League Undergraduate Office be-
tween 1 p. m. and 3 p. m. on Monday,
Thursday and Friday each week.
Laundry Help Needed
At present, there is an urgent need
for workers in the laundry, Miss
Weiss said. Coed workers, who are
paid 53 cents an hour, handle only
clean linen, and do such work as
folding, sorting, and piling.
Laundry workers are asked to put
in a minimum of six hours each
week, although workers must report
on the same days. Hours open are
from 7 p. m. to 5:30 p. m. every
week day.
Help is.needed in the West Quad-
rangle cafeteria, where coeds are
asked to work for their board at
lunch or dinner, or at both. Work-
ers are to report at 11:15 a:. m. daily
for their lunch, and work from 11:45
a. m. to 1 p. m. in the serving line.
Dinner is served at 5 p. m. to work-
ers, who serve the "chow line" from
5:45 p. m. to 7 p. m. Sunday supper
is served at 5 p. m., and coeds work
from 5:30 p. m. to 6:30 p. m.
May Sign Up in League
Summer help is needed at the
League cafeteria during breakfast
hours and at the soda bar in the
evenings. Workers, who are paid
60 cents an hour, may arrange their

Representative
of WAVE's
Will Be Here
Chief Allan Kay, of the WAVES,
will be at the Ann Arbor Post Office
Building, south basement entrance,
from eleven a. in. to four p. m. to-
morrow to talk to women about the
service.
Michigan's WAVE applications
showed a marked increase during the
week following news of the invasion,
it was reported by Lieut. Cmdr. By-
ron E. Flechtner, officer in charge
of Lower Michigan Navy recruiting.
"It is gratifying to note the fine
manner in which women of this
state have reacted to the invasion
news," said Comdr. Flechtner. "It
shows their patriotism in responding
to their country's needs."
Explaining that thousands more
WAVES are needed to take over jobs
of Navy men now assigned in this
country, he urged other women to
investigate the opportunities offered
in the WAVES.
Enlistment in the WAVES is open
to women, 20 to 36 years old, who
are U. S. citizens and have had at
least two years of high school or
business school.
Lifesaving Will
Be Offered*
A broad program of activities,
which will include classes in lifesav-
ing, will be held during the summer
term, according to Mrs. Dorothy
Miller of the Women's Athletic De-
partment.
Lifesaving classes, which are open
to all women students, will be held
at the Union Pool at 8:30 p. m.
Tuesday and Thursday evenings
starting July 6, at the Union Pool.
The group, which will be headed by
Jeanne Paty, '44, as instructor, will
work for junior, senior, and instruct-
or Red Cross ratings.
Other activities will include arch-
ery, tennis, riding, body condition-
ing, golf, dancing, badminton, andj
elementary swimming.

I
l
i
I

New Try-Out
PolicyAdopted
By Women
Newcomers Are Urged To
Attend Meeting Tomorrow; E
Rapid Advancement Possiblej
The Daily women's staff will in-t
augurate a new policy concerning
summer session staff members, it was
announced yesterday by Peg Weiss,
summer women's editor.
While persons with no previous ex-1
perience in newswriting will receivej
instruction, women who have work-
ed on other newspapers may start
their careers as reporters immedi-
ately with a brief explanation of
Daily style..
After the all-staff meeting at 4:301
p. m. tomorrow, new members will+
have a chance to show what they
can do in the line of news and
headline writing. Those who showl
satisfactory ability and experience1
will be given beats to cover immedi-
ately.+
Instruction To Be Given
Tryouts who have had no news-
paper experience will find this seme-
ster an opportunity to learn prac-
tical journalism. Older staff mem-
bers will teach newswriting and
headline-writing, and after some
practice the novices will be given
assignments of actual writing for
the Daily pages.
Each member of the staff is asked
to work on "night-desk" once a
week, work which begins at 4 p. m.
and usually lasts until 6 or 7
p. m. While the night editor "makes
up" the page for the next day, other
staff members write headlines and
read copy.
Promotion Possible
Staff members who show ability
are promoted to junior night-editor-
ships, paid jobs which bear the
responsibility of putting out each
women's, page. From these positions,
coeds are eligible for senior positions:
women's editor and associate women's
editor.
Work during the summer session
offers to coeds interested in journal-
ism the opportunity to get a "flying
start" on the Daily, for the staff
will be smaller than usual

Many

WAC Assignments

Based on Previous College Work

The coming WAC recruiting drive
will provide an opportunity for June
graduates and graduating seniors to
exchange their caps and gowns for
the trim uniform of the WAC, and to
help perform the 293 different types
of Army duties now taken over by
the women.
WACs are in demand for the Army
Air Forces to dispatch giant cargo
planes and to instruct in the use of
Link-trainers. They are needed in
the Army ground forces where they
make military maps and do admini-
strative work, and in the Army ser-
vice forces which keep American
soldiers equipped, supplied with food
and ammunition, and in good health.
A background in physical sciences
opens the door to many fields. In
some cases, college training alone is
sufficient; in others, the Afmy sup-
plies supplementary training. Among
the available assignments which use
physical science training are medi-
cal technician, chemist, physics lab-
oratory assistant, and electrical in-

strument repairman.
Psychology, sociology and other
social sciences equip a WAC to take
on the duties of personnel technician,
psychological assistant, classification
specialist, personnel consultant, and
assistant or personnel noncommis-
sioned officer.
Fine arts training helps in carto-
graphy, entertainment, or theatrical
productions, while English is useful
in performing the job of public rela-
tions specialist, reporter or canvas-
ser for recruiting.
Frosh May Petition
For Judiciary Aides
Petitioning is open for three fresh-
man aides for Women's Judiciary
Council, it was announced yesterday
by Peg Morgan, '44, Judiciary presi-
dent.
All applications must be in by July
12, and petitioners will be interviewed
during the following week.

To Be

University coeds are folding up only at the Surgical Dressigns Unit
in the League during the summer term. Folding bandages is only one
of the many war projects being carried on this summem.

own schedules. Those interested may
apply at the manager's office in the
League.
Those interested in serving as
"proxy parents," taking care of chil-
dren in the evenings, are asked to
leave names and telephone numbers
at the Undergraduate Office in the
League.
War Council officers will be in the
Undergraduate Office every after-
noon to provide further information
about projects and to sign up coeds
for work.
* * *
Junior Girls Project
Each coed house is asked to send
at least one representative to the

Junior Girls Project mass meeting
at 3:30 p. m., Monday in the Grand
Rapids Room of the League, accord-
ing to Jean Hotchkin, '46, JGP sum-
mer chairman.
The present central committee will
meet at 4 p. m. tomorrow in the
merit committee room in the League.
Plans for the summer include con-
tinued house and booth stamp and
bond sales, another 'bow day," and
a second "Jamboree."
Hospital Project
Summer term students are invited
to a mass meeting of those interested
(Continued on Page 7)

FIX UP YOUR ROOM... 4
Make your room an inviting spot this summer
with dresser scarfs, rugs, laundry and shoe
bags, towel, and other items ...from
Always Reasonably Priced
GAGE LINEN SHOP
10 NICKELS ARCADE

First -
BUY
WAR BONDS
then'-

... Y h.
.r .n., .. .
ti,

S-t-r-e-t-c-h your Dollars
for those wonderful Values
in our JULY

MAKE-UP fr yu4

4
4

FOR A LIGHT TAN:
DuBarry 'Dark" Beauty Cake
Carmeen Rouge and Lipstick
FOR A MEDIUM TAN:

SUNTAN

Your opportunity to fill in your summer
wardrobe - Also for Fall and Seasons to
come. Here are a few of the highlights:

I

';

DuBarry "Light Tan" Beauty
Red Gold Rouge and Lip
FOR A DEEP'
DuBarry "Deep Tan" Beauty
Regal Red Rouge and Lip

Cake
pstick
TAN:
y Cake
pstick
FACE POWDER
DEBUT SIZE $1
ROUGE $1
LIPSTICK $1

Frkes plus !ax
? Last year we used it because of the stocking crisis
. this year because we have learned to love it!
This Richard Hudnut Lotion smooths on easily
... evenly ... dries in a jiffy and looks like your
very best pre-war nylons, so lovely and sheer!
pi00
Inpopular Tropicalarid Bronze shades. T

100 DRESSES
Prints, Jerseys, Crepes. Both dark and
light colors. Original prices 10.95 to
35.00.
25 COATS
Chesterfield and Casuals, Pastels and
Darks. Original prices 29.95 to 49.95.
Sizes 10-44, 161/2 to 241/2.
251 SUITS

/

at
112
of
Original
Prices

#.,.+

W~ai Jire Yoju )tnq

Casual and Dressy types
Black, Blue, a few Pastels.
29.95 to 49.95.

in Brown
Originally

WHERE - ARE YOU GOING?
Summer School week-ends are playtimes for all. Wherever you plan to
go whether swimming at Barton Pond, or canoeing on the lake, dancing
to the music of BILLY LAYTON and his Orchestra, partying at the
P-BELL, or hiking in the country you'll find the right apparel for you at
COLLINS'. Why look further . . . you're slightest wish is our oppor-
tunity to serve. COLLINS' welcomes you to ANN ARBOR and the

also groups of
SUMMER SUITS and
BETTER DRESSES at 20.00

.- .-i D.. r'~ .~~M~N"" U L~ 11 /~-J.~ I'tA I

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