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July 15, 1944 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

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.SA'C 1Y.flJULTY 125.1194

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U' To Sponsor
Conferences
On Education
Future of Education to
Be Theme of Meeting
"What is Ahead in Education?"
will be the theme of the Fifteenth
Annual Summer Education Confer-
ence sponsored by the University
from July 24 to July 28.
Problems in guidance, the curricu-
lum, elementary education, health
education and music will be discussed
in a series of lectures supplemented
by roundtable conferences conduct-
ed daily throughout the week. Work
of the Red Cross and of the Office of
Price Administration will be empha-
sized in selected roundtables.
An extensive exhibit of new text-
books, including a special exhibit
provided by the University Library
Extension Service, will be maintain-
ed by the Michigan representative of
the publishers of instructional ma-
terials.
All meetings of the conference will
be held in the University high school
and elementary school buildings,
where the exhibits will be located.
Visitors and the general public are
invited to attend.
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

AFTERMATH IN SPAIN:
Civil War Hatred Disappearing
From Country, Visitor Reports

Russians Near
East Prussia . .

GOOD NEIGHBORS:
17 South American Foresters
To Train Here on Fellowships

"

.I

"Spain is gradually recovering from
the grave and serious disease of
hatred instigated by its Civil War
and is on the way toward the estab-
lishment of political and economical
stability," Prof. Ignacio de Lojendio,
head of the Department of Political
Science and Public Law at the Uni-
versity of Seville, Spain, said in an
interview yesterday.
Prof. de Lojendio has been in the
United States for four months and is
making a lecture tour of this country
under the auspices of the Carnegie
Institute's Endowment for Interna-
tional Peace.
Studied at Four Universities
After having received his master's
degree in Spain at the age of 17,
Prof. de Lojendio attended the Uni-
versity of Paris, Oxford and the
University of Vienna.
"Whether Spain establishes a re-
public or a monarchy after the pres-
ent war, the essential problem of the
country is to adopt a program of
political education which would not
be burdened by hatred and political
and social prejudices," Dr. de Lojen-
dio stated.
"I probably am optimistic, but I
believe that different; political atti-
tudes and sections can exist side by
side," he continued.

Unemployment Reduced
He said that the material condition
of the country was very good and
that the problem of unemployment
had been immensely improved. "Pov-
erty scarcely exists today," he added.
Discussing Spain's relations with
the South American countries, Dr.
de Lojendio said that the attitude of
the Council of Hispanidad towards
Latin-America was entirely one of
sentimental ideologies and that it
was not directed with the ulterior
purpose of economic or political im-
perialism.
Cites Academic Freedom
"In Spain there exists great aca-
demic freedom in the secondary
schools and universities," he contin-
ued. To prove his point, he cited the
example of a former minister of the
republic who now holds a position on
the, faculty of the University of
Seville.
"One of my ambitions," Dr. de Lo-
jendio stated, "is to see in the future
a permanent interexchange of stu-
dents between the American and
Spanish universities, because, in my
opinion, the UnitedStates will be the
center of cultural equilibrium after
the war."

(Continued from Page 1)
which Hitler and Stalin partitioned
Poland in 1939 and from which the
Germans attacked the Russians June,
22, 1941.
At the present rate of Russian pro-
gress, observers here predicted they
might be in Brest-Litovsk in four or
five days.
It was obvious that the Russian
forces were moving on for a tremen-
douUs showdown in East Prussia,
the cradle of "Junkerism". The of-
ficial Soviet government paper Izve-
stia assured its readers that "the
borders of the Soviet Union will re-
main far behind the Red Army.
Picnic, Record Dance
Planned by Churches
An Island picnic with members of
the Wesley Foundation and a record
dance for students and servicemen
at St. Mary's Chapel are planned for
today.
Reservations may be made for the
picnic by calling 6881 and the group
will leave the Methodist Church at
8:30 p. m. The dance will be held in
the clubrooms of the chapel with
table tennis and refreshments also
available.

NIGHT

With the assistance of University
tuition fellowships and the State De-
partment, a group of 17 selected pro-
fessionals in the field of forestry,
representing 11 Latin American
countries and Puerto Rico, are now
enrolled in the School of Forestry
and Conservation at the University
of Michigan.
Many of these Latin American stu-
dents are agricultural engineers out-
standing in their work, and several
are college professors.
The program, initiated by the Uni-
versity, offered 20 tuition fellowships
for a period of four terms to qualified
students in forestry and wood tech-
nology from other American repub-
lics. The State Department agreed
to assist in providing transportation
and maintenance for a limited num-
ber of those selected, while the Insti-
tute of International Education made
the contacts and handled negotia-
tionscwith the candidates.
'U' Picks Students
Final selection was made by the
University, which considered partic-
ularly the training, technical quali-
fications and proficiency in English
of the applicants. In some cases
travel and maintenance were grant-

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
for
PRESCRIPTIONS DRUG SUNDRIES
STUDENT SUPPLIES

MAAZI NES

STATIONERY

LIGHT LUNCHES
Served at our Fountain
PARAMOUNT Developing
and Printing of your Films
'he k"TA4 MoTre STA the CSTREET
340 SOUTH STATE STREET

(Continued from Page 2)
the Department of Speech will be
given tonight at 8:30' in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Tickets are
on sale daily at the Theatre box
office from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Michigan Sailing Club: Members
please attend a meeting which will
be held at one o'clock in the Union
today.
Russian Film: "Battle for Russia,"
will be presented for the last time
this evening at 8:30, Rackham Lec-
ture Hall. Admission free.
Plantation Party: Wouldn't you all
enjoy a real Southern Plantation
Party? Yes, Sir, Southern Hospitality
at its best-complete even to the
Mint Juleps-Charming Belles-Soft
Lights and Sweet Music. The Plan-
tation is none other than the USO-
the night-Saturday, 8 to 12, July
15. There will be dancing-refresh-
ments-all in all a very pleasant
evening.
Swimming Party: Swimming you
may go!! Every Saturday 12 men are
invited to go on a swimming party at
Whitmore Lake. The swimming trip
leaves the USO Club at 1 Saturday
and returns to Ann Arbor at 5 o'clock.
It is a mighty fine chance to spend
the afternoon swimming and on the
beach. If you want to go, you should
sign up ahead of time here at the
Club.
USO Open to Servicemen, Wives,
Families: You may think that the
USO Club is open only to the ser-
vicemen but that is not the case. The
USO is open at all times not only to
you servicemen but also to your wives
and families. Your wives and fam-
ilies are always welcome at the Club
to visit, play cards, dance or just
relax. If the servicemen's wives would
like to organize a "Wives Club," the
Club is theirs for that use. If at any
time we can be of assistance to you
and your family, don't hesitate to
call on us for help.
The Hillel Foundation will hold its
first summer "mixer" dance-enter-
tainment this evening from 9 p.m. to
midnight. Everyone on campus, es-
pecially freshmen and servicemen,
are invited.
'Coming Events
Play. "The Learned Ladies" by
Moliere will be presented Wednesday
through Saturday, July 19-22, by the
Michigan Repertory Players, at 8:30
p. m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
lit,

Tickets
to 8:30
day.

are on sale from 10:00 a. m.
p. m. each day except Sun-

Chnurches
First Congregational Church, State
and William Streets, Rev. Leonard
A. Parr, Pastor. Sunday: at the
morning service, 10:45, Dr. Parr will
speak on the subject "Miracles A-
head." At 4 p.m. students and ser-
vicemen will leave the Guild House,
438 Maynard Street, for a picnic and
vespers at Riverside Park. In case of
unfavorable weather the program
will be held inside. The group will
return to campus by 7 p.m.
Memorial Christian Church (Disci-
ples) : Hill and Tappan Streets. 11
a.m., Sunday morning worship. The
Rev. Parker Rossman, Minister, will
speak on the subject "A God Worth
Believing In." At 4 p.m. students
and servicemen will meet at the
Guild House, 438 Maynard Street,
for a trip to Riverside Park for
games, a picnic supper and vesper
service. The group will return to
campus by 7 p.m. In case of unfavor-
able weather the program will be
held inside,
First Methodist Church and Wesley
Foundation: 120 S. State St. Satur-
day, the Wesley Foundation group
will leave the Wesley Lounge at 8:30
p.m. for baseball and a picnic at the
Island. Reservations may be made
by calling 6881. Sunday, student
class at 9:30 a.m., Dr. E. W. Blake-
man, Leader. Morning worship ser-
vice at 10:40 o'clock. Dr. Charles W.
Brashares will give the communion
meditation on "Responsibility" and
communion service will follow. Ves-
per service at 5 p.m. followed by a
reception for the Brashares family.
First Baptist Church, 512 E. Huron.
C. H. Loucks, Minister. Saturday,
choir practice in the church at 7:10
p.m. At 8:30 p.m., Roger Williams
Guild party at Roger Williams Guild
House, 502 E. Huron St. Sunday,
10, Roger Williams Class in Guild
House, studying "The Prayer of
Jesus." 11, Church worship. Sermon,
"Freedom Is Not Enough." 5,-Meet-
ing of Roger Williams Guild at Guild
House. Prof. Shorey Peterson of the
Economics Department will speak on
"The Economic Aspects of Building
a Permanent Peace."
First Presbyterian Church, Wash-
tenaw. Sunday morning worship at
10:45 a.m. Sermon by Dr. Lemon,
"The End of Our Times," based on
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

the prophet Isaiah. Sunday at 4:30
p.m. Dr. Lemon will give the second
in the Summer Series on "Religion
and the World's Literature-Shake-
speare, Our Contemporary." There
will be a supper and social hour fol-
lowing.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Service Sunday at 11
with sermon by the Rev. Alfred
Scheips on the topic, "A Fatal
Choice."
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet this Sunday afternoon at
4. The group will leave from the
Parish Hall, 309 E. Washington St.,
to' go to the home of Mrs. Paul
Preketes on Crest Ave. for an after-
noon of games and a picnic supper
and evening devotional service. Ser-
vicemen and students are welcome.
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
409 S. Division St. Wednesday eve-
ning service at 8 p.m. Sunday morn-
ing service at 10:30 a.m. Subject,
"Life." Sunday school at 11:45 a.m.
A convenient reading room is main-
tained by this church at 106 E.
Washington St., where the Bible, also
the Christian Science Textbook, "Sci-
ence and Health with Key to the
Scriptures" and other writings by
Mary Baker Eddy may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased. Open daily ex-
cept Sundays and holidays from
11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays until
9 p.m.

ed, while in other cases only travel
expenses were included, and in still
others only free tuition was offered.
In a few cases the governments of
the countries concerned also, pro-
vided financial assistance.
In recent years forestryacircles in
the United States have placed more
and more emphasis on the impor-
tance of South American, forest re-
sources, which represent approxi-
mately 28 per cent of the total forest
resources of the world. Latin Ameri-
can professionals are now being given
a chance to become acquainted with
the forestry practices of the United
States, which have been developed
by many years of experience.
'New Era' Promised
"This training will enable us. after
our return, to start a new era in the
management of the forest and in the
utilization of its products in our own
countries," a student from Chile said.
Together, North and South Amer-
ica possess nearly half of the forest
resources of the world, and it is pre-
dicted that this percentage will be
increased relatively after the war
because of German exploitation of
the forests of occupied countries.
12 Countries Participate
Among Latin Americans partici-
pating in the program initiated by
the University, two representatives
each come from Chile, Ecuador, Mex-
ico, Peru and Uruguay. Argentina,
Guatemala, Haiti, Cuba, Paraguay,
Puerto Rico and Venezuela are each
represented by one student.
The State University of Chile, the
University of Quito, the University of
Asuncion and the University of Ca-
racas are represented by college pro-
fessors within the group.
School of Education
To Hold First Frolic
Square dancing, bridge, bowling
and other assorted amusements will
be offered at the School of Education
Frolic at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Woman's Athletic Building.
The frolic is open free of charge to
everyone, especially students and
servicemen interested in education.
Prof. Ross L. Allen, of the physical
education department, did the over-
all planning, while Renah Green,
Grad.E., Marie Van Vleet, Grad.E.,
and Marguerite Bronk, Grad.E., com-
pose the planning group of the Wo-
men in Education. The Men's Edu-
cational Club, presided over by Ray
E. Dearoff, Grad.E., is also helping
with the arrangements.
Latin-American Society
Will Hold Dance Today
An informal dance in honor of new
Latin-American students will be held
at 8 p.m. today in Rackham assembly
hall.
Members of the Latin-American
society and their friends are invited
and new members of the Latin-
American student body are urged to
attend,

RoUSGH
J-
Sa
METZGER'S is famous for its
Chicken-in- the - Rough. You
haven't really tasted chicken
until you've had some prepared
this very special way. It's a
treat to eat.

DHY
C alling all ec ruri ans! N ow 's
the time to eunioy a canter
along our Wooded Bridle Path.
Plan a riding party with your
friends this week-end. GOLF-
SIDE STABLES has a courtesy
car at your disposal.

an11(

*

4k /e** to ite
UNION DANCE
£2tw'rdaq 7719ht
UN 4
and dance to the music of
BILL LAYTON
AND H I S O R C H E S T R A
featuring
JUDY WARD ... DoERB EIDEMILLER
WHITEY BENSON ... AL TOWNSEND

Get Your ]Exercise

AND HAVE FUN
AT THE SAME TIME

25c an Hour
$1.00 all day
OPEN EVENINGS
AND SUNDAYS

,
e , s
y m 6
i
\ -

For an afternoon of pleasure
and exercise play a game of
golf at the MUNICIPAL GOLF
COURSE We have a beautiful
turf to offer and some expert
instructors who will help you
perfect your game.
*
It's the P-BELL, an old Michi-
gan tradition which will enrich
your college days All newcom-
ers on campus are invited to
join in an evening at the Bell.

CAMPUS BIKE SHOP

510 East William Street

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-,Vlt 4L -11

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k-A

4k

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--:--i

SNAP

BANK

-C --,
f ,, ,k

BY MAIL

Students!
DON'T
FORGET
oA O4t

YOU SAVE PRECIOUS TIME AND GASOLINE
WHEN YOU BANK BY MAIL, AND IT'S EASY!

Off on a spree! A nice leisure-
ly ride to the country and the
picturesque places around Ann
Arbor, Rent a bike for the day'
or the hour at the CAMPUS
BIKE SHOP.

fl0c

You merely endorse your check, and mail it with
your bank book and a mail deposit slip. Your
account will be credited with the amount of the
check and your book and a receipt sent to you.
Write for a supply of deposit slips today!

You can get your copy of the SUMMER

I

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1111

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