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August 25, 1944 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-08-25

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5,1944H T MICHI6XX -DAILY FG

E F VE

Hillel Foundation Adds Wartime
Activities to Peacetime Schedule

STATEWIDE PROGRAM:
Adult Education Institute Aids
Local CommunityGroups

Performing a social, educational
and religious function for Jewish
students, the 16-year-old B'nai Brith
Hillel Foundation chapter at Michi-
gan has added to the scope of its
peacetime activities with a varied
program of war activities.
Under the leadership of Rabbi Je-7
hiudah M. Cohen, a secretary, an
elected student council of 25 mem-
bers, and a staff of student directors,
the Foundation provides for students
and servicemen personal counsel,
dances, record concerts, religious ser-
vices on Friday nights and major
religious holidays, dances, picnics
and the opportunity to meet and
make new friends.
Students can find outlet for liter-
ary or photographic propensities by
either working on the Hillel News or

in the fully equipped Hillel dark-
room. Women, meeting once a week,
have an opportunity to perform an
important war service by making
bandages as members of the Red
Cross Surgical Dressing Unit, which
has thus far set an enviable record,
receiving official Red Cross com-
mendation for its accomplishments.
Students are welcome to take ad-
vantage of the well-stocked,neon-
lighted, Louis Weiss Memorial Li-
brary. The library, with a fine col-
lection of books dealing with Jewish
subjects and including many recent
best sellers, is open from 8 a.m. to
10 p.m. every day for students who
wish to study there. The Foundation
also regularly receives more than a
score of nationally distributed maga-
zines and newspapers.

Part of the function of the Univer-
sity as a statewide institution is ful-
filled by the Adult Education Insti-
tute, designed to aid and supplement
local youth and adult community
organizations.
The Institute, which grew out of
the W. K. Kellogg health program,
initiated more than a decade ago in
Branch County, became a separate
part of the University's Division of
Extramural Services in 193. The
present head, Dr. Howard Y. Mc-
lusky, professor in the School of
-Education, laid the foundation of the
Institute in the two years prior to
1938.
Institute Was Broadened
Originally designed to stake part in
community youth activities, the In-
stitute broadened to take in adult
activities when it was found that it
needed cooperation from both groups
to function successfully.
Discussion groups, which were ori-
ginally formed, led to more perma-
nent organizations in the form of
community councils and youth coun-
cils. At present the Institute sponsors
community discussion forums, in the
manner of the New England town
meeting, on national and foreign
affairs, conducts surveys of com-
munity centers, and aids in the

maintenance of youth and commun-
ity centers.
A tabulation last spring revealed
that 154 communities, 77 active com-
munity councils, 21 community cen-
ters, 54 youth councils, 47 youth cen-
ters, 78 special projects and 41 pub-
lications on these activities are all
connected with the Adult Education
Institute. More units in all brackets
are constantly being formed.
Dr. McClusky emphasized the func-
tion of the Institute was not to ini-
tiate or control these local centers
but merely to supplement and aid
them wherever possible. This is done
through pamphlets, speakers and
joint meetings.
Adult Education Conducted
The University's Extension Service
also conducts an adult education
program somewhat similar to that
of the Adult Education Institute's,
The Extension Service, under the
direction of Dr. Charles A. Fisher,
has sponsored meetings of labor
leaders, business and manufacturing
executives, firemen and an annual
adult education meeting. The er-
vice also directs the correspondence
course program of the University
which reaches many other Michigan
and non-Michigan residents who
never attended the University.

.,l

-1

CLASS OUTDOORS-An Army Japanese class moves out on the grass. No new sight, civilian students
have become accustomed in the past two summers to these groups clustered on the grass around cam-
pus.

BONDS

ArmEy..
(Continued from Page 1)

Bank for Free dom!
OPEN A
DANK ACCOUNT
-WITH US

The Ann Arbor
connectionst
wel l-equipp
handle

Bank offers

sound

d a trustworthy

At its peak the Army had 2,200
men stationed on the campus and
through the cooperation of the Uni-
versity and campus organizations, the
men were integrated into campus
life.
Newest service unit on campus is
the Civil Affairs Training School for
the Far Eastern Area, initiated July
31, which is composed of both Army
and Navy officers.
During a six months intensive
training course, they are studying
languages, essential characteristics
and people of the Far East and the
application of principles of military
government to occupied territory.
Co A. headed by Capt. George
Spence came to campus in January,
1943 and staged a musical show that
spring entitled "Nips in the Bud"
which won national honors in a con-
test for Army musical productions.
Co. B heade'l by Capt. William
Brigges is r"... up of pre-medics and
engineer.. During the summer
months there were also pre-dents in
this company, but when the army
12 Graduated
In First Class
The graduation of the first class,
with its 12 graduates, is described in
Elizabeth M. Farrand's "History of
the University of Michigan," pub-
lished in 1884:
"It was a great day for the town
as well as for the University; mer-
chants closed their stores, and old
and young crowded to the church.
Each student of the graduating class
delivered an oration, and, in the
judgment of the press of the day,
each acquitted himself well.
The Detroit Advertiser said of
them: 'The pieces spoken by the
graduating class were, for the most
part, of superior merit, evincing a
depth of originality of thought and
a clearness of beauty of composition
that is seldom surpassed in the older
colleges.' Professor Tenbrook made
the closing address to the class, and
in the afternoon Dr. Duffield ad-
dressed the literary societies."
Until 1841 the University had no
president but the faculty was in the
habit of choosing a chairman from
their group. In 1852 Henry Philip
Tappan was invited to become the
first president and it was he who
made over the little country college.

personnel

to

your banking

affairs.
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NEW STUDENTS are urged to get in touch with their churches as soon as they
are settled at the University. The churches listed on this page have planned special
meetings for students on the first week-end of the school year. A complete list
of Ann Arbor Churches may be found in the freshman handbook of Student
Religious Groups.

dental program was discontinued
hey were given other assignments.
Co. C which is known as the
ASTPR is made up of 17 year olds
vith Lt. Carlyle Garrick as com-
rianding officer. Lt. Charles Atkin-
on is commanding officer of Co. D
which established its reputation in
Ann Arbor by putting on an original

-- a, 1

REGISTRATION WEEK-END
at the

musical comedy, "Rumor Has It,"
the first army show in which coeds
took part.
Co. G is the medical company. Lt.
Frank Labiaux is the commanding
officer. These men are housed in
Victor Vaughn which was used as a
dormitory of civilian medical stu-
dents before the war.

CAMPUS

CHURCHES

101 SOUTH MAIN

3 30 SOUTH STATE

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, and SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 28,

29

Member Federal Reserve Deposit Insurance Corporation

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As a student it helps a great deal to know
just where to shop for your personal gifts
in the line of fine jewelry
We have been serving Ann Arbor for forty
years and are proud to offer you our experi-
ence and prestige in jewelry buying.

Er

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
AND W'!SLEY FOUNDATION
South State and East Huron Streets
Saturday, 8:30 p.m.-Party
Sunday, 10:40 a.m.-Morning Worship Service.
5:00 p.m.-Wesleyan Guild Meeting
6:00 p.m.-Supper and Fellowship Hour
Reading Room and Recreation Room open daily.
Dr. James Brett Kenna, Minister
The Rev. Ralph G. Dunlop, Associate Minister
Mildred E. Sweet, Student Director
Phone 6881
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William, and Thompson St.
Rectory 331 Thompson
Saturday 9:00 pflmfi-Open House
Saturday 9:00 p.m.-Open house in Chapel Auditorium
Sunday Masses 8:00, 10:00 11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 a.m.
H I LLEL FOUNDATION
Haven and Hill
Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen
Conservative religious services are held in the foundation
chapel each Friday evening at 7:45 p.m.
The Foundation is open from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. during
the week and until midnight on Friday and Saturday eve-
nings.
During the Orientation Weekend there will be open-house
all day Saturday and Sunday.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST
409 South Division
Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-Church Service
11:45 a.m.-Sunday School
Wednesday, 8:00 p.m.-Church Service
Reading Room, 106 E. Washington
Hours: 11:30-5:00-Saturday 11:30-9:00.
Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.-Christian Science Organization
University of Michigan, Chapel of the Michigan League.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
AND REFORM CHURCH
South Fourth Avenue, between William and Packard
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.-Church School
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship
6:00 p.m.-Student Guild meeting
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
C. H. Loucks, Minister
Miss Ruth McMasters, Ass't Student Counsellor
512 East Huron-Guild House, 502 East Huron.
Sunday, 10:00 a.m.-Roger Williams Class, New Testament
Study
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship
5:00 a.m.-Forum and Discussion meeting at the Guild House
Open House Saturday Night-8:30
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw near South University
Friday, 6:30 p.m.-Picnic on the church grounds followed by
Open House in the Recreation Hall
Sunday, 10:45 a.m.-Morning Worship and Sermon
Sunday, 5:00 p.m.-Westminster Student Guild-Fellowship
and supper.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Sponsored jointly by the Zion and Lutheran Churches
Zion Lutheran Church-E. Washington at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service
Trinity Lutheran Church-E. William at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service
Lutheran Student Association-309 E. Washington St.
4:30 p.m.-Miss Ching-Wen Hu will be the speaker at the
regular meeting.

rrA^{, K

We take particular pride in our fine cut rings.
If it's a feminine gift you are looking for
we have it in exquisite earrings that any girl
would be proud to wear.
For that boy in the armed forces a sterling
silver identification bracelet is the perfect
gift.
For Lasting beauty in a gift, give Jewelry.

UUNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor
Worship: Our Lutheran student congregation worships each
Sunday of the school year at 11:00 a.m.
Fellowshin: Our student guild is Tau Chanter of Gamma Delta.

ST. ANDREW EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine Street at Division Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Services of Worship in St. Andrew's Church
Sundays
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon (Holy Communion
and Sermon on the first Sunday of the month.)
Niv.-May-5:00 p.m.-Choral Evening Prayer Service.
Tuesdays
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, War Shrine
Wednesdays
7:15 a.m.-Holy Communion, High Altar

lil 111

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