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July 06, 1944 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-06

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JULY 6, 1944

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

First Grid Practice

Draws

126

Tryouts Will

FROM RAGS TO RICHES:
Wiese Paces Wolverine Nine
At the Plate with .378_Clip

Final tabulations of the 1944 Wol-
verine batting averages show right-
fielder Bob Wiese leading the pack
with a fancy .378 mark, followed
closely by hard-hitting shortstop
Bruce Blanchard, sporting a .375
figure.
Four others of Coach Ray Fisher's
regulars finished in the select .300
circle, headed by pitcher Elroy
Hirsch at .355. Hirsch was followed
by utility outfielder Bob Nussbaumer,
who hit at a .349 clip and steady
centerfielder Don Lund with .348.
Lund boosted his average 48 points
in the last two games by collecting
six hits in nine trips to the plate to
rack up the campaign's outstanding
individual hitting spree. Included in
the six safeties were a home run, a
triple, and a double.
Bill Gregor, the squad's leading
collector of extra-base blows, was the
only other Wolverine to finish over
the .300 mark, coming in with .315.
Elmer Swanson was the next regu-
lar at .275.
The efforts of these men were

largely responsible for the fancy .290
season average which Michigan com-
piled during the 20-game schedule.
Wiese Tops 'Em

PLAYER

G ABH

Manko ...........2
Wiese............15
Blanchard ........20
Hirsch ........... 9
Nussbaumer . .....17
Lund ............ 20
Gregor........... 18
Swanson .........20
Schmidtke.......3
Phelps ........... 8
Farnyk ...........15
Bowman..........8
Ketterer ..........19
Stevenson........19
Kell ............. 10
Nelson ........... 2
Hackstadt .........1

3
373
80
31
43
69
70
69
4
8
57
26
69
67
19
5
1
658
619

2
14
30
11
15
24
22
19
1
2
14
6
14
13
2
0
0
191
108

Pct.
.667
.378
.375
.355
.349
.348
.315
.275
.250
.250
.246
.231
.203
.194
.105
.000
.000
.290
.174

Nine Lettermen Return
From Last Year s Team
Captain Bob Wiese, Nussbaumer, Ponsetto,
Lund Head List; Four Line Veterans Report
By DAVE LOEWENBERG hard-driving backs, while Nuss-
Candidates numbering 126, includ- baumer is the elusive and speedy
ing 29 civilians reported yesterday member in this returning quartet.
to head coach H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler The problem at present will be to get
for the initial practice of the 1944 more speed in the Maize and Blue
a hbackfield. Incidentally, Lund is not
football campaign. expected to arrive on campus until
The list of nine returning letter- sometime in August.
men is headed by captain-elect Bob Bauman Back
Wiese and winner of last year's most The roster of returning lettermen
valuable player award. Wiese is ex- in the line includes big 6'2" Clem
pected = to be one of the main spark- Bauman, a tackle, Harold Watts at'
plugs in this year's Wolverine back- center, Art Renner at end, and Wil-
field. liam Sigler at the guard post.
Three other veteran backs from Bauman was the recipient of the
last year's squad, Bob Nussbaumer, 1943 Chicago Award annually given
Don Lund, and Joe Ponsetto are also to the most improved player in
slated to see much action this sea- spring practice. Bauman looks like
son. Jim Alliber, the fifth return- a potential starter in the 1944 line.
ing back, was a reserve on last year s Renner, because of his pass-snar-
Ponsetto, Lund, and Wiese are all ing ability, can be counted to supply
_L_______ some of the offensive strength for
this season's Wolverine team.

Meet at 4 P.M
Tomorrow
Opportunities for Newspaper
Experience Offered to Coeds
On Summer Women's Staff
Coeds interested in working on
The Daily Women's Staff are asked
to attend a meeting at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in the Student Publications
Building, it was announced yesterday
by Peg Weiss, '44, summer women's
editor.
The summer Women's Staff will
be formed from tryouts, and each
coed will be given a "beat" to coverI
and a night desk assignment. No
previous experience is necessary. I
At the meeting each tryout will be
given several stories to write in order
to test her ability in writing the
types of stories most frequently used
on the woman's page. Those who
show ability and experience in these
types of writing will become report-
ers after a brief 'explanation of Daily
style, while others will be given in-
struction in newswriting.
Since campus war activities have
been for the most part taken over by
coed groups, the Women's Staff has
summed an importance far above the
traditional fashion-writing and so-
cial news-gathering. Women's Staff
"beats" now include virtually all
campus war activities.
Coeds who join the Women's Staff
during the summer session will have
opportunity for better "beats" and
more experience in working on The
Daily, for the staff will be smaller
than during the regular term.

Waves Will Intewiew Campus
Coeds Today in League Lobby

Service Names Special Fields
Of Training Needed by Navy
Women interested in the WAVEs
may obtain first-hand information
on the service from Lt. (j.g.) Helen
Stewart and Charlotte Bierce, Sp.
R 2c, who will interview local coeds
today in the League lobby and today
and tomorrow at 126 S. Main.
A new policy has been announced
by the WAVE headquarters, by which
women are commissioned for special
types of duty indicated by their
civilian training as well as by the
needs of the Navy. Officer candi-
dates are procured directly from ci-
vilian life, and are given two month's
general indoctrination at Smith Col-
lege in .Northampton, Mass., after
which they may receive special
training.
Thirty Fields Specified
Although experience is desirable
for all programs offered, it is not
an essential requirement for areol-
ogy, chemistry, communications,
cryptanalysis, physics, supply corps,
and occupational therapy.
Thirty special fields for WAVE
officers have been announced in a
recent pamphlet, which may be se-
cured at the interview. The work
specified is in accounting, adminis-
tration, aerology, cartography, chem-
istry, communications, cryptanalysis,
and educational services.
Also announced are fields in insti-
tutional management, law, library
science, mathematics, office manage-

TEAM.
OPPONENTS

20
20

e

Tigers .limit Sox
To Eight Bingles
Trout Scores Tenth Win
In Twilight Game, 8-1
BOSTON, July 5--UP)-Backed by
a 12-hit attack, something quite un-
usual for him, Paul Trout pitched-his
tenth victory tonight as the Detroit
Tigers defeated the second placej
Boston Red Sox, 8 to 1, in a twilight
game before 5,126 spectators. It gave
Detroit a two-to-one edge in the

x'
JUNIORN
It costs so little to look so
ely, So sweetly feminine
such luscious colors.
Sizes 9-17

C

.,.
00

,,,
.."
A ,,,,,,. '
.M'

series that ends tomorrow.
Trout, who blanked the Philadel-
phia Athletics in his last start, was
S deprived of another shutout when
Bob Johnson belted a homer into the
left field stands in the fourth inn-
ing. By that time Trout had a five-
ov- run lead, and he protected it like a
picnicker guarding a T-Bone steak.
. .Trout spaced eight hits very effi-
ciently, yielding one an inning ex-
cept in the sixth when he allowed
none. Meanwhile, Joe Hoover belted
two doubles and a single and Jimmy
Outlaw got two doubles to lead the
Detroit drive on Emmett O'Neil and
Eddie Lake, the latter a reformed
infielder. O'Neil was charged with
his fourth defeat.
Detroith...... 14 010 020 -8 12 1
Boston .......0040 10 0 000-1 8 0
Trout and Swift; O'Neil, Lake and
Wagner.

CRMPUS SHC
304 South State

A host of freshmen were among
the arrivals reporting for yesterday's
practice. Not much is known about
most of these yearlings but some
have achieved outstanding records in
high school competition.
Freshman Standouts
One of the brightest freshman
prospects is lanky Dick Rifenberg, an
all-state end from Saginaw, Michi-.
gan. Another all-stater from Mich-
igan is Quentin Sickels, a tackle,
from Benton Harbor. '
Another duo of all-staters from
Defiance, O., also bear plenty of
watching. They are Eugene Deri-
cotte, a back, and Charles Wahl, a
center.
The large number of candidates
reporting is extremely gratifying but
the overwhelming majority of these
men are very inexperienced. The job
of the coaches will be moulding these
17-year-old civilians and new Navy
trainees into an efficient and well-
coordinated unit.
Summer Ca re
Drills Produce
New Innovation
A new innovation in Michigan ath-
letics was introduced yesterday when
assistant basketball coach, Bill Barc-
lay, announced that summer basket-
ball drills would be conducted three
times weekly during the semester.
A squad of 15 men was invited to
take part in the practices as the
Athletic Department attempts to
boost Michigan's sagging basketball
fortunes up to the level of its other
fields of athletic endeavor.
Most of the men called out have
drawn the favorable attention of the
coaching staff while participating in
PEM games, but at least three per-
formers from last year's squad,
which finished sixth in the Western
Conference, are expected to be out.
Heading the list of prospective
cagers is Marine trainee Tommy
King, star forward on last season's
outfit. King was voted the most
valuable player on the squad by his
teammates at the close of the cam-
paign and was also one of the lead-
ing scorers in the Big Ten.
Bob Stevens, reserve forward, and
Robb Ruttledge, a promising fresh-
man from last year's squad, are also
among the group. Stevens is a Ma-
rine trainee while Ruttledge is in
the V-12 program.
The 15-man squad will work out
three times weekly as a regular V-12
PEM section at 4:15 p.m. No general
call for candidates has been issued
as yet.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

.-jhtj t3 uour 9. -o
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Starts at 7:30
fliemkerj 0/
BILLY LAYTON'S bC FIELDING, M c
r ORCHESTRA
3n.,7 ront o/fMltcJl icng,
_________ __________ ir
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