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July 08, 1943 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1943-07-08

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PAGE FOUR

TTHE MICHlIGAN fDAILY

THURSDAY, 3ULY 8, 1949

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Lt.-Col. Gaud
Defines Foreign
Reciprocal Aid
Yank Troops Abroad
Receive Allied Supplies
On Lend-Lease Basis
"Reverse lend-lease transactions
have assumed much greater propor-
tions than most people in this coun-
try think. All overseas commanders
have been directed to procure every-
thing possible locally and to make
such procurement through; means of
reverse lend-lease, or reciprocal aid,
wherever possible," said Lt.-Col. Wil-
liam C. Gaud, G.S.C., speaking on the
varied work of the International Aid
Division, Headquarters, Army Serv-
ice Forces, at the Judge Advocate
General's School yesterday..
Reverse lend lease as defined by
the speaker is the term applied to
supplies obtained from the Allies
free of charge. - In addition. to an
informal agreement with China,
the United States has specific
agreements in this regard-with the
United -Kingdom, Australia, New
9 Zealand, the Fighting French, the
Belgians and the Dutch.
In order to aid commanders of the-
atres of . operations a general pur-
chasing board is set up in each thea-
tre, composed of procurements offi-
cers and a judge advocate, for the
purpose of obtaining supplies and
materiel.
Board Relies on JAG's
According to Colonel Gaud. the
board relies to a great extent upon
the services of the judge advocates.
Over-all agreements are negotiated
and summarized with local govern-
ments by the military lawyers, and
claims and obligations are investi-
gated, adjusted and settled..
"In short, it is up to the Judge
Advocate General and his assis-
tants to perform the time-honored
lawyer's function of bringing to-
gether the principals .in these
transactions and seeing that their
relations are smooth and harmoni-
ous. The attitude Qf foreign coun-
tries toward us after the war will
be in large part conditioned upon
the manner in which these impor-
tant duties are carried out," Col-
onel Gaud observed.
To make reverse lend-lease oper-
ate, only one rule: is followed-com-
mon sense. Sometimes the foreign
government will have blankets or
tents wanted by us in its, own stock.
Then a requisition is made through
proper channels and' the require-
ment is filled immedi'ately.
Various Arrangements Used
If the item is one not carried in
stock by the foreign government,
that government .may. undertake to
procure it for our forcesi turning over
to us the product when completed.
In some cases we purchase the com-

Gliders Stage First Trans-Atlantic Flight and Practice Invasion Tactics at Hone
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I-'--- I

International
Center Is Host

#,

In a preview of invasion tactics, an Army jeep is backed through the hinged nose of a huge transport
glider at Grand Rapids airport. The demonstration was part of a show presented by a combine of fur-
niture companies which builds wing and floor assemblies for this type of glider.

Freight, including vaccines for Russia, and radio, aircraft and mo-
tor parts, is loaded aboard the glider at Montreal's Dorval airport in
preparation for the first trans-Atlantic glider, flight. The glider was
towed from Montreal to Britain in 28 hours by a Douglas transport.

modity ourselves and submit an ac-
count to a foreign government for
reimbursement. In other areas we
are furnished a bank credit periodi-
cally, against which we may draw
for the purchase of certain specified
goods.
The method followed in reverse
lend-lease is immaterial if it is mu-
tually satisfactory and the United
States has its needs met free of
charge.
"Food, perhaps, is the most fre-
quent subject of such transactions,
but clothing, telephone service, labor,
transportation, billets, and barracks
are obtained in this way," Colonel
Gaud added.
"It may be of interest to know that.
just as we export commodities such
as meat, which are rationed here, so
in the United Kingdom, Australia,
and New Zealand, our forces receive
clothing or other items rationed
there,''he said.
Colonel Gaud .also discussed the
functioins of the Director of Ma-
terial,, Maj.-Gen. Lucius D.' lay,
whose mission is procurement of
supplies for - the entire army, as
well as the four Staff Divisions
working under General Clay: Re-
quirements, Production, Purchase,
and the' International Aid Division
with which he serves.
Matters he referred to included
the workings of the lend-lease pro-
gram by which we furnish aid to our
Allies, the manner in which the Army
procures -supplies overseas, the ac-
tivities of the Board of Economic
Warfare as they affect the Army.

CAN YOU SPARE $1.50, BUD?
Coed Daily Salesmen Launch
Blitz Invasion of Fletcher Hal

Editor's note: The following is an
anonymous contribution of the Flet-
cher Hall service men.
FLETCHER HALL: The girls in-
vaded this theatre of operations on
Wednesday, July 7, bent upon selling
a subscription to every troop sta-
tioned here.
Without a word of warning the
lovelies infiltrated, but they were
late by a complete week; for the
soldiers had been paid on June 30
and, as is customary in the mili-
tary, especially after a long holi-
day week-end, the boys' wallets
were thoroughly depleted.
However, undaunted and not to be
outdone by any such trivial obstacle
the men rallied and managed, by dig-
ging into a couple of penny banks
which belonged to the kid next door,
to make some sort of showing. At
any rate the soldiers surrendered
willingly,- and the maneuver will go
down in history as a successful rout
on* the part of. the talented salesgirls
of The Daily. .
The presence of women within
the monastery-like confines of
Fletcher Hall jumped the service
men's morale, which was already
exceptionally high, at least thirty
points.
The troops, will all the enthusiasm
of a sailor returned from a two year
cruise without having seen a soli-
tary woman, stared at the flashing
forms. Petty and Varga girls, not to
mention a couple of sketches by
Earl Moran, were ripped from walls,
closet doors and secret ,albums. .
One chap even destroyed his
Esquire date book and souvenir
Captain J. O'Conner
Promoted to Major
Capt. Jeremiah J. O'Connor, Jr.,
of the staff and faculty of the Judge
Advocate General's School has been
promoted to the rank of major, it
was announced today by Col. Edward
H. Young, Commandant.
A graduate of Georgetown Univer-
sity and Georgetown Law School,
Major O'Connor was with the inter-
pretative division of the Securities
and Exchange Commission in Wash-
ington, D.C., before being called to
active duty in October 1941.
After serving with the litigation
division of the Judge Advocate Gen-
eral's Office, Major O'Connor at-
tended the school here as a member
of the 8th Officers Class and was
retained on the staff upon gradua-
tion. He is now acting chief of the
military affairs department of the
school in the absence of Lt.-Col. Reg-
inald C. Miller. -

I photo of Margie Hart! Sic transit
gloria pulchritudon is!
Seriously, however, we want to
give our sincere thanks to the direc-
tors and students of the University
for having welcomed us so royally.
We begin our courses on Monday,
July 12, and then buckle down to
the grave job ahead of us.
We are proud to be part of Mich-
igan and glad to make the ac-
quaintance of all of you. We want
to give additional thanks to
Monna Heath and the Michigan
League for the swell dance they
gave for us last Friday.
Incidentally, if when the moon is
full in the middle of the night you
hear a lonely wail from the direction
of Ferry Field, do not fear that Lon
Chaney, Jr. has again turned into
a hideous werewolf. It will be only
a soldier, remembering that he is-
a Wolverine!
Coed Ushers Are Needed
For 'Ladies in Retirement'
Women interested in ushering for
the play "Ladies in Retirement" to
be given by Play Production today,
tomorrow and Saturday are request-
ed to sign up in the undergraduate
office in the League as soon as pos-
sible.
Everyone who registers will be re-
quired to appear at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre by 8 p.m. the night
they are to usher. Anyone who wish-
es to usher for any of the later plays
may also register today.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Hillel Foundation
To Sponsor Mixer
All service men stationed on cam-
pus and students are invited to at'-
tend the opening mixer dance from
9 p.m. till midnight Saturday at the
Hillel Foundation.
Mr. and Mrs. Osias Zwerdling and
Dr. and Mrs. Saul Cohen will be
chaperons. Featured at the first
mixer will be dancing, refreshment
and special entertainment. Hostes-
ses will be on hand to meet and in-
troduce all newcomers.
A group of service men from the
Willow Run Air Base will be guests
of the Foundation.
Hillel Elects Eight New
Members to Council
At the second meeting of the Sum-
mer Semester, eight new members
were elected to the Hillel Council
bringing the number of Council
members to fifteen.
The fifteen members are Leonard
Nemeravalzi, president, Marjery
Batt, vice-president, Rita Hyman,
secretary, Elise Zeme, co-chairman
of the membership committee, Elise
Gitlow, student - director, Arthur
Kraft, publicity chairman, J. Louis
Singer, Milton Warren, Elliott Or-
ganic, Hyman Sterngold, Max Dres-
den, Israel Jacobson, Arthur Kauf-
man and Shirley Winokur are mem-
bers-at-large.

Army Reports
Bomb Record
WASHINGTON, July,7.--(M)-The
Army reported today this summary
of the first year's operations of the
8th Air Force oyer Europe-68 day-
light bombing missions, 102 indus-
trial- targets, naval bases and war
plants destroyed or damaged by a
total of 11,423 tons of bombs, and
1,199 enemy planes shot down.
Losses were 276 American heavy
bombers. However, in addition to
the enemy aircraft confirmed as de-
stroyed, gunners of the 8th Air Force
probably destroyed 525 more, and
damaged 501.
The losses of American planes av-
eraged oply 3.91 per cent in 7,067
sorties against Germany and Ger-
man-occupied Europe, a sortie being
a single flight by one plane.
Student Officers Train
For Naval Architecture
Eighty-two student naval officers,
members of the Reserve Officers
Naval Architect group, are training
here preparatory to active duty in
naval architechture.
All graduate engineers from col-
leges all over the country, the naval
architects have ratings of ensigns
and lieutenants.
The group arrived in Ann Arbor
June 22 and the majority of them
have living quarters in the Union.

At Reception
Foreign Students and
Townspeople To Meet
New Director Friday -
All foreign students, as well as
American friends from the faculty,
student body and townspeople, will
be welcomed at the International
Center's fifth annual Summer Re-
ception to be held at 8 p.m, Friday
at the Center.
"Everyone who attends will have
an opportunity to meet the new di-
rector of the Center, Dr. Esson M.
Gale, and his wife, as well as to be-
come acquainted with- each other,"
Pames Crowe, assistant director of
the Center said yesterday.
Dr. and Mrs. Gale will be assisted
in welcoming the visitors by Pro,
Arthur S, Aiton, a member of the
board of governors of the Center, and
Mrs. Aiton; Prof. Irving A. Leonard,
a member of the University Commit-
tee of Latin-American Affairs, and
Mrs. Leonard and Mrs. Aga-Oglu of
Turkey.
* * *
International Center To
Rold Conversation Tables
Three foreign language conversa-
tion tables will be conducted at the
regular International Center tea
from 4 to 6 p.m. today.
Faculty members and foreign
language student interested in prac-
ticing conversation in French, Span-
ish or Portuguese are cordially in-
vited to participate, James Crowe,
assistant director of the Center, said
yesterday.
Prof. Julio del Toro of the lang-
uage department and his Spanish
conversation group as well as native
Latin-Americans will form the nu-
cleus of the Spanish.
Post-War Council.
Plans Student Poll
Plans for the conducting of stu-
dent opinion polls on post-war prob-
lems, and special lectures by a" well-
known authority on international. af-
fairs were discussed by the Post-War
Council at a meeting held yesterday
in the Union.
Mary Lee Grossman, chairman' .f
the Summer Speakers' Bureau, a-
nounced that student speakers would
work in conjunction with the Coun-
city in conducting panel discussion
during the summer among the dorm-
itories and sorority houses.
The Post War Council, which ais
under the direction - of Elizabeth
Hawley, '45, meets at. 7:15 p.m.
every Tuesday, Room 304 in the
Union.

for

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Y{;

Better Drem┬žes
fromt 12.95
Keep looking -fresh, cool and
feminine in clothes that really
flatter. Gay. linens, cottons
and sheers.
Channbrays & Ginghams
Others from 5.00

:
:
>.

took ike -
Precision-ta'lored "Hendon
Mannish Shirts" in spar-
kling white rayon pique.
Other Hendon Shit
at $2.25 and $2.95

(Continued from Page 2)
fered for the summer term. This is
a four hour course covering the basic
principles and practices of radio
communications and is still open for
enrollment to students without tech-
nical background. There are no pre-
requisites. Class hours are as fol-
lows: Lectures and Rec. MWF 8, 445
W. Eng. Lab. Tues. 2-5 Room 111 W.
Eng. Code Practice Tues. Thurs. 7-8
p.m. Room 111 W. Eng. Hours may
be rearranged if there is enough jus-
tification for it. Students wishing
to elect EE 23n may attend class this
evening 7-p.m. or tomorrow morning
at 8. -J. S. Needle, Instructor
Economics 173: Assignment for
Friday. Finish reading chapter 4,
and prepare problem 7, chapter 4.
f f
K /
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'1-j

t

Look Fella's
It's the 'DAIUY'
Yes, The Dcily is being sent every day to servicemen
everywhere there is mail service. You just can't quench
their thirst for campus news. Give some soldier, sailor,
or marine a taste of his alma mater in that far-off spot
he now calls his base.

~~J.j ,

I!

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