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August 20, 1943 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1943-08-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUG. 2a, 1949

PAGE FOUR FRIDAY, AUG. 20, 1043

Co. A

To Present Repeat of Hit Musical,

'Nips in the Bud'

Revue To Be Sponsored
By 'U'Bond Committee
Show Will Be Given Sept. 29 or 30; May Also
Be Put On in Detroit; Bonds To Be Tariff

War Factory Queens Share l oy

(Continued from Page 1)
the present plan of one or more Ann
Arbor performances.
Among the veterans who will be
featured in the new version are the
two stars, funny-man Pvt. Al Acer-
no and romantic-voiced Pvt. Allen
Beach. Private Acerno and Pvt.
Gordon Cotler, the droll redhead,
who stole so many scenes in the
original "Nips," write most of the
gags which are rife throughout the
skow, and they've had four months
to dig up new material, most of
which is satire, subtle and other-
wise, but always funny, on the
various phases of Army life at
college, Private Yudkoff said.
Company A's well-known Soldier
Choir will also be a main feature of
the show. The forty man chorus has
recently completed a five week
broadcasting engagment over WJR,
Detroit, and their concert at Hill
Auditorium last Sunday, was termed
"one of the best I have ever heard,"
by Professor Hardin Van Deursen,
head of the Univesrsity School of
Music voice department. Both Private
Beach and Pvt. Arthur Flynn, form-
er concert singer at Town ,Hall in
New York, who made solo appearance
in Sunday's concert, will be featured
in the chorus.
French Group
To Try Pucheu
For Treason

The group which joined Company
A in June has yielded several new
performance probably chief of whom
is Pvt. John Boucher, formerly of
Stanford University, who has a bag
of comedy skits that ,keeps the boys
in the barracks laughing.
Company A has had an oppor-
tunity to try their new version of
"Nips" in rough form. The unit
went on the road, though not far,
about a month and a half ago,
when they were requested to en-
tertain' the Air Force group sta-
tioned at Willow Run. The cast
put on two shows on one Saturday
under the worst possible theatri-
cal conditions.
The "stage" was an upraised altar,
generally used for religious services,
and the curtains were four or five
sheets, commandeered from the Air
Force. No lighting and very few props
were used, but when the show was
over, the Army audience went away
with real guffaws.
Lt. Spence Convinced
This test was enough to convince
the producers and Company A's gen-
ial commanding officers, Lt. George
Spence, that with some polish and
right staging, "Nips" was well worth
displaying to the public again. The
sponsorship of the Bond Committee
is the logical culmination of the idea.
The show is run by a five man
committee headed by Private Yud-
koff, and Private Cotler, and Prvt.
Gerald Stoner and Pvt. Richard
Malkin, who write all the music.
The latter two have revised the
score of "Nips" to include new
songs and lyrics.
Promotion and stage production is
hndl dV b P vt Miltnn AL it. r

Fellow workers at a Salt Lake City war plant selected these beauty
queens for "their ability to get along with fellow workers" as well as
for their shapeliness. Left to right are Pat Young, Helen McDermaid
and Dol Lee Chandler.
BUT ONLY ON PAPER:
Hospital, Ambassador B ridge
Hit as Bombers Raid Detroit

Air Corps Band
Will Present
Concert Sunday
Chaplain Hour To Be
Held on Library Steps
For Students, Residents
A fifteen minute concert by the
Air Corps band preceding 'The
Chaplain's Hour" to be held at 4 p.m.
Sunday on the library steps, has been
added to the program planned by the
Army Air Force Detachment.
The band, which has appeared in
numerpus civic parades, will open the
concert with the "National Emblem,"
to be followed by the "American Pa-
trol."
Cpl. Wachelz Directs
The 33 piece band, which is direc-
ted by Cpl. Edward R. Wachelz, will
then play "The Missouri Waltz" and
"Semper Fidelis."
Dr. E. W. Blakeman, Counselor in
Religious Education, will give the
invocation, followed by a welcoming
address from Master of Ceremonies,
Pvt. Gerald T. O'Brien.
The 50 man chorus of the detach-
ment, directed by Pvt. Robert W.
Whitmer, will then lead in group
singing of the "Army Air Corps
Song."
Following the singing, Chaplain
Francis P. McVeigh, Lieutenant, U.S.
A.A.F., will speak on "The Duties of
an Army Chaplain."
The band, which will be making its
last concert appearance of the year,
will then do a specialty number,
"Trombones on Parade."
Chaplain Samson Will Speak
"TheServiceman's Place in the
Post-War World" will then be dis-
cussed by Chaplain Paul Samson,
Captain, U.S.A.A.F.
The program will close with "The
Victors," played by the band, and
group singing of "The Star Spangled
Banner."
"The concert and lectures, spon-
sored by the Chaplain's Committee
and the Student Religious Associa-
tion, is our way of saying thanks to
Ann Arbor," Pvt. Stanley Diamond,
program chairman, said yesterday.
"Many of the men in the detachment
will be leaving within a month, and
we wanted to show our appreciation
for all that has been done for us
while we were here."
Members of the committee besides
Private Diamond are Pvt. Bruce
Cooke, Pvt. Gilbert Koch, Private
O'Brien, Pvt. Dwight Smith and Pvt.
Gilbert Steiner.
USO Dance Is
Open to Officers
Naval Attendance Has
Been Officially Okayed
Naval officers may attend the Uni-
versity USO dances to be held from
7:30 to 9:45 p.m. today in the
League.
According to Nancy Upson, presi-
dent-elect of Mortarboard society for
the remainder of the summer, per-
mission for all naval officers on cam-
pus to attend the affair has been
1 granted officially. As always the non-
commissioned men will be welcome.
The policy of allowing both offi-
cers and enlisted men to attend the
USO dances will be continued for
the rest of the summer, Miss Upson
added. There will also be a USO
dance from 7:30 p.m. to midnight
tomorrow.
There will be dancing to the mel-
odious tunes of a nickelodeon in the
Grand Rapids Room and those who
do not care to dance will find check-
ers, bridge, bingo and other mis-
cellaneous games awaiting them

Sailor-patients at the U.S. Naval Convalescent Hospital at Yosem-
ite, Calif., enjoy a view of the valley from Inspiration Point.
PEARL HARBOR VETERAN:
MP Sham Battle Sounds Like
Cap Pistols to Lti. Rousch

Convalescing and Sight-Seeing Sailors

naniea ay rv. . on zanize ,
Many Ex-Executives while stage management and equip-
To Be Investigated ment fall to Pvt. Dick Snyder and
Pvt. Joseph Bothwell-
As Axis Collaborators Yudkoff also stated that more def-
inite information about the new pro-
ALGIERS, Aug. 20-RP)-A storm duction would be released very short-
of excitement, unsurpassed in French ly when all arrangements have been
legal annals since the Dreyfus case, completed with the various commit-
has arisen here over the impending tees interested in backing it.
trial of former Vichy Interior Minis--}
ter Pierre Pucheu on charges of C rs a i
treason. h ita iy T
A new "purging" committee is pre-
paring to present evidence which is Be Discussed
certain to indict the former official,
working from a detailed dossier of B Dr Hart
Pucheu's actions which has been col-
lected over many months.
More Arrests Probable Believing that the Christian need
A large number of other former not dig down 1900 years into the past
executives, military and Navy offi- for the revelation of God's relation
cers, professional men and even busi- to man, Dr. Hornell Hart, professor
ness executives have been similarly of sociology at Duke University, will
investigated, and.probably will be ar- discuss "The Nature of Liberal Chris-
rested shortly. tianity" at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow in the
The "purging" committee was or- Rackham Amphitheatre.
ganized to investigate the actions of Dr. Hart, who will speak under the
men suspected of collaborating with auspices of the Student Religious As-
the Axis after the armistice and to sociation, is a member of the British
determine the extent of their respon- Psychical Research, and has contrib-
ibility for such collaboration. uted to The New Republic, Forum,
There are numerous instances of the New York Times Magazine, and
Frenchmen being jailed, tortured and the American Journal of Sociology.
held without trial throughout the In 1930 Dr. Hart was appointed to
empire for the political "crime" of a committee to study social trends
having refused to cease fighting, by President Hoover.
Pucheu Arrested Early A second lecture to be sponsored
The formation of the French Com- by the S.R.A. will be given at 8:15
mittee was the first concrete step p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 15 in the
taken' by any of the United Nations Rackham Ampitheatre by Dr. Char-
to bring retribution to its own Quis- les C. Morrison, representative of the
lings. Pucheu was the first to be ar- neo-Orthodox group in Christianity.
rested. Editor of the Christianity Century,
The question of whether the trial Dr. Morrison believes that the es-
should be public also is deeply agi- sence of the liberal tradition is op-
tating French opinion, position to authoritarianism, and not
Proponents of closed sessions fear the rejection of the unique features
repercussions throughout the empire of Christian theology.
as well as in metropolitan France In 1937 he was a delegate to Ox-
when the evidence against the ac- ford and Edinburgh Ecuminical Con-
cused official is unfolded. ferces and in 1939 he delivered the
The opposite view is that convic- Lyman Beech Lectures at Yale.
tion at a closed trial would leave Dr. Morrison has written several
suspicion that he was crucified by books including "The Christian Cul-
political enemies. tus" and "The Social Gospel."
WINOT
WITH BILL SAWYER
AND HIS BAND
AT THE
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
ni i t-N/f"\NA A

LANSING, Aug. 19 -UP)- De- 1
troit and Flint were attacked by
enemy bombers today; the Ambas-
sador bridge was hit; a wing of
the Ford hospital in Detroit wast
demolished, and upwards of 2,000t
casualties were reported. But it was
all done within one room and thet
blood was all on paper.
The room was the basement of the
new state air raid control center, de-
scribed as the first in the United
States. It was placed in operation
today by Capt. Donald S. Leonard,
State Director of Civilian Defense.
Location Is Secrett
Leonard emphasized that for sev-
eral months an emergency control
center has been functioning in Mich-
igan while the full-dress center was
being prepared. Its location a secret,
the construction center was delayed
by scarcity of materials.
While most major cities and many
counties have local control centers to
receive reports of bomb damage from
block air raid wardens, Leonard ex-
Victory Vanities
Tickets on Sale
Eliminations To Be
Tuesday, Wednesday
Tickets for the second Victory
Vanities to be held at 8 p.m. Satur-
day, August 28, will go on sale today
at the Union, the League and at State
Street bookstores.
Eliminations for the Vanities will
be held Tuesday and Wednesday. The
top eight or ten houses offering skits
will stay on for the finals, Doris Barr,
League chairman of the joint Union-
League sponsored project, said yes-
terday.
Added attractions to the Vanities,
who will not compete for the war
bond prizes to be offered, are Com-
pany A, 3651st S.U. which will of-
fer a scene from their hit revue, "Nips
in the Bud," the Naval Chorus and
the Navy-Marine Band. Company A
will also present several other skits.
Organized along the lines of the
Victory Vanities held last February,
short skits from various campus
houses and organizations will make
up the competing acts. A number of
campus houses and several individu-
als will offer talent for the program.
Co. A Will Invade
Arboretum Tonight
The men of Company A will invade
the Arboretum again this evening
in a little "after dinner" exercise.
Officers of the unit are taking the
men out for night maneuvers, and
any bombs seen bursting in air will
not mean that Ann Arbor is being
invaded. They will have an oppor-
I-- '.-- 4". .---4 ..... . t, 4-- n- 4 i..1

plained, the State Control Center
acts to receive requests from local
and district control centers for ad-
ditional assistance and to dispatch
that aid from neighboring communi-
ties. In addition, it coordinates vari-
ous governmental agencies to insure
obtaining maximum use of available
equipment and services.
Newsmen See Mock Attack
With the chiefs of the State Citi-
zens Defense Corps Division at the
key posts, Leonard today ran through
a mock bombing attack for newsmen
in a control room lined with maps of
the state and with panels picturing
the results of the bombing attack.
The attack, on paper, inflicted
10 fatalities, 100 gas attacks, 200
fires, 60 road blockades, 2,000 cases
of incendiary bombs, 500 high ex-
plosive attacks, the crash of two
bombers-but it all went smoothly
from an official standpoint. De-
troit drew on medical and fire de-
partment equipment from neigh -
boring communities, Saginaw, Bay
City and Midland sent help to
Flint, the State Highway Depart-
ment diverted traffic from the
danger areas and other simulated
problems were solved.
Leonard said frequent tests have
proven that an air raid alarm now
can be flashed to every community in
Michigan in 10 minutes and to every
hamlet in Wayne county in three
minutes.
'Bill Suw To
PlNay Tontight
Playing the newest hit tunes of the
season, Bill Sawyer and his orchestra
will swing out from 9 p.m. to mid-
night in the League today, when
coeds, studen ts, and servicemen
gather for dancing.
Following their usual policy of in-
formality, no ties or coats will be
necessary, Sawyer stated.
Sawyer also said that he would
play several of his new arrangements
that have been featured at the
League dances recently.
Engineers To Hold
Beer Picnic Soon
A beer picnic for all engineering
students will be held at 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, August 28 on the Island.
Departmental baseball games wil
be held, with various groups of engi-
neers challenging each other. Tickets
for the picnic may be obtained fron
any member of the Engineering
Council.

Noise of a sham battle which will
be staged at 7 p.m. Monday on the
golf course during the Army Salute
to Agriculture, Industry and Labor
sounds like so many cap pistols to
the officer in charge, Lt. Leslie G.
Rousch, a veteran of the Japanese
attack on Pearl Harbor.
'This Is Nothing'
Although land mines, aerial bombs
and 75 millimeter cannon firing
blanks explode during the mock bat-
tle, "They are nothing compared to
what I heard that morning on Oahu
Island," to quote Lieutenant Rousch.
He lived in the Hawaiian Islands
22 years, serving the Army 20 years
and working as a civilian two years
between enlistments. At the time
of the Nipponese blitz he was sta-
tioned with the 5th Chemical Com-
pany Service Aviation, at Hickham
Field, one of the Japs' principal
targets.
Here's his account of the blitz, in
brief:
"I was eating breakfast in my
quarters on the field at 7:55 a.m.
I heard one plane roar overhead,
which wasn't unusual around an
airfield of that size, then a bomb
crashed and I remarked to my
wife, 'I think the plane crashed.'
I ran out and looked at the land-
ing mat on the field, then saw an-
other plane, and just then a bomb
dropped from it. Then I knew we
were being attacked.
"That bomb I saw fall hit about
500 yards away. Following closely
came a wave of planes which hit our
hangars, mostly with incendiary and
demolition bombs. I decided to get
to my company, which was in bar-
racks about four city blocks from my
quarters. I dodged machinegun bul-
lets and screaming bombs during
that race and reached my company
commander.
Moved Out Immediately
"My company moved out immedi-
ately, setting up machineguns along.
Pearl Harbor channel which borders
Hickham Field. And we did all
right, too, considering that none of
the 62 enlisted men in that company
had ever handled a machinegun be-
fore.
"The second attack came about
9:30 a.m. and consisted of an esti-

mated 100 to 150 planes of which
United States gunners shot down
42 which were actually counted as
positively downed. I was standing
on the porch of the company office,
having just come up from under
the building, when bombs hit the
parade ground not 50nfeet away.
"I felt something on my, chest,
looked down and saw a hole in my
shirt. I tore it open and pulled off a
piece of bomb fragment. The com-
pany clerk who was with me. rushed
inside, got an iodine tube, ripped 'It
open and swabbed the wound freely.
I didn't even go to the dispensary for
treatment.
'I Was Lucky'
"I figure I was lucky to get off that
easy, but in our entire company of 88
there was only one casualty, a soldier
who was in the guardhouse was sria
iously wounded. The first Jap bomb
hit the firehouse at Hickham Field
and the guardhouse adjoined the fire
department. The second bomb burst
the big water main. Those two fac-
tors made it tough to fight fires."
Lieutenant Rousch, assigned to
the 739th Military Police Battalion
at Camp Mount Vernon, Ill., is an
expert in pyrotechnics and demoli-
tion work from his training in the
Army Chemical Warfare Service.
His job is placing the land mineus
aerial bombs and other charges of
explosives used during the Arny
Salute sham battle.
He served two years in World War
I, getting a discharge in 1919 and re
enlisting in SanaFrancisco in 1921.
He was sent to the Hawaiian Islands
to join the 27th Infantry, the Wolf
Hound Regiment which fought in
Siberia during the first World War.
After serving three enlistment,
a total of nine years, he tried a
civilian job as inspector with the
transportation company for two
years, but rejoined the Army. Foi
the last four years he has been in
the Chemical Warfare Service.
Lieutenant Rousch left the Islands
June 5, 1942, in a convoy which, be-
cause the Battle of Midway was in
progress, required 11 instead of tqe
usual five to seven days to cross the
Pacific Ocean. The crossing was
uneventful.

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