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June 16, 1942 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-06-16

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%OAVIJ'C~hE 18,X94THE MICHIGAN' DAILY
I'M To Launch HueSm e Sports Proramr Next H ul'lu

PAGE, mE
Wee,

The Cracker Barrel
By Mike Dian
Daily Sports Editor
* Crisler Loses Kruse, Star Freshman End

W olverine Captain

Softball Play Highlights
Big Outdoor Schedule

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MICHIGAN'S 1942 football team
suffered a severe blow yesterday
when it was learned that Harold
kruse, star freshman end from Flint,
would not rekirn to the University
in the fall because of scholastic dif-
ficulties.
According to many Wolverine
grid fans Kruse was the best Maize
and Blue end prospect since All
American Ed Frutig enrolled at
- Michigan.
During the past winter Coach
Fritz Crisler has pointed out time
and again that one of the loop-
holes on the team that needed
1lugging before the season began
was at end.
It won't surprise many of the more
astute Midwestern football touts if
Kruse goes to. Notre Dame to finish
his college career. Beiore the lanky
freshman decided to come to Ann
Arbor he was debating between Mich-
igan and the famous University at
South Bend.
* * *
WHEN the Big Ten-Pacific Coast
track meet gets under way at

Dyche Stadium in Evanston, Ill., to-
day four Michigan speedsters will
appear in the Conference lineup: Bob
Ufer, Dave Matthews, Al Thomas and
Frank McCarthy.
Originally McCarthy was not
scheduled to compete in the meet
but when Iowa's Hank Vollenweider
was -called into the Army, Big Ten
officials picked Jhe Michigan hurdler
as a substitute.
Ufer and Matthews took part in
the NCAA meet in Des Moines last
week. Although Matthews took a
fourth in the half mile he turned in
his best time of the season when
he ran the distance in 1:52.1. The
record breaking Ufer still seems to
he having trouble with his injured
leg because the game junior didn't
even place in the 440-yard run.
M ATT MANN, smiling Wolverine
-swimming mentor, could prac-
tically form a tank squad from his
ex-pupils that are now at the Great
Lakes Naval Traiinng Station. Among
the more prominent representatives
are Tom Haynie, Dobby Burton and
Bill Canton. All these boys are
teaching swimming to the sailors.
Canton has just been promoted and
will instruct officers in aquatic
activities starting next week.
* * *
M ICHIGAN got more thait its
share of baseball laurels this
year as it tied for first place and
retained the Big Ten Crown.
Official Conference figures show
that the following individual hon-
ors were taken by Wolverine play-
ers.
Most Hits: Don Robinson, 20,
Most Runs: Dave Nelson, 20.
Most Bases: Bud Chamberlain, 27.
Most Home Runs: Paul White,
Chamberlain, 2.
Most Runs Batted In: Chamber-
lain, 25.
Most Stolen Bases: Nelson, 11.
Immediately following the last
game of the season Don Robinson was
elected 1943 baseball captain. The
sensational little shortstop was the
first sophomore to be elected to that
honor in more than 10 years.
"Robie" lead the Wolverines in
hitting this year with the excellent
average of .416. Many of his hits
came from some beautiful bunts and
before the season was very old many
Big Ten coaches were calling him
the best bunter that they had ever
seen in college competition. Rival
third basemen would stand practic-
ally on Robinson's neck waiting for
a bunt, but the speedy shortstop con-
tinued to beat out their futile at-
tempts to throw him out.
CRACKER CRUMBS: All-Ameri-
can Bob Westfall enrolled in
summer school yesterday and will
probably stay in Ann Arbor until
the fall when the Army calls himn
up.

Dave Matthews, lanky Royal Oak
quarter-miler who leads a four-
man Michigan team in the Big
Ten-Pacific Coast meet today.
Williamts' A terage
is 1Joosted To .337;
(ordon Still Leads
CHICAGO, June 13. -{AP)- Ted
Williams, who a month ago was
plodding along the American League
batting trail at a .287 pace, scarcely
a shadow of the .406 with which he
won the 1941 hitting title, has an-
chored himself well up in the .330's
through Sunday's games. That's not
good news for his slugging rivals nor
for the league's pitching corps.
The Boston Red Sox blaster, his
average hoisted clear to .340 two
weeks ago, fell to .324 in seven days
but with a week's effort of nine hits
in 20 times at bat came up to .337,
good enough forefifth in the latest
tabulation.
The real contest thus far, however,
is between a pair of second basemen,
Joe Gordon of the New York Yankees
and Bobby Doerr of the Red Sox.
Gordon's mark .fell seven points in
seven days to .386, while Doerr re-
mained stationary at .375 and there-
fore trails by only 11 points.
Last week's no. 3 man, Bill Dickey
of the Yanks, dropped a point to
.345 and saw his position endan-
gered not only by Williams' rush
but also by a surge by Les Fleming,
the Cleveland Indians' first baseman.
Fleming, tied a week ago in eighth
with Ted, rallied 15 points worth to
move up to fourth with a .339.
After Williams come Stan Spence
of Washington, .329; Buddy Hassett
of New York, .328; John Pesky of
Boston, .324; Jeff Heath of Cleve-
land, .312, and Bruce Campbell of
Washington, .310.

By AL STEINMAN
Competition, which has always
been the key note of University of
Michigan sports, will again be em-
phasized beginning late next week
when the Intramural Department
launches its 15th annual "Play For
All" program.
Earl Riskey, the director of I-M
activities, announced that competi-
tive sports will be offered to Fratern-
ities, Residence Halls, and Independ-
ents, just as they are during the reg-
ular school year. These organiza-
tions should elect athletic managers
as soon as possible so that a definite
program can be mapped out. The
sooner that the 'managers are chosen
and contact the Intramural Depart-
ment, the quicker action will begin.
Softball Featured
The principal sport will probably
be softball, and if at all possible
leagues will be formed to run the
entire summer. With good weather
here to favor the athletes, there
should be many games played before
the end of the term. If there are
enough teams entered in the pro-
gram, two leagues will probably be
formed and will be climaxed by a
"Little World Series" late in the sea-
son.
Now if you are not a ball player
don't -think that there isn't a place
for you in I-M sports, because such
things as tennis, swimming, golf,
horseshoes and track will also be of-
fered on an individual as well as
competitive basis. The emphasis will
very definitely be placed upon out-
door sports, and swimming will be
about the only inside activity offered.
A great deal of the action will take
place on South Ferry Field. Swim-
ming will be held in the Sports Build-
ing Pool, home of one of the na-
tion's best collegiate teams, and golf-
ers will have the opportunity to com-
pete on the University's own cham-
pionship course. The I-M staff will
take care of all officiating and will
furnish most of equipment needed.
Fletcher Dorm Winner
Anything can happen in Intra-
mural competition as was shown in
the all-year championship complet-
I ed last semester. Williams House,
which had won the coveted title the
year before, was apparently on its
way to another crown with only one
week of games left. On the last day
when the results were tabulated, it
was found that Fletcher Hall had
nosed out Williams by just a few

points. It was a knock down, furi-
ous battle right down to the finish,
and was typical of the competitive
spirit shown at Michigan.
The other team awards were won
by Phi Delta Theta in the fraternity
division, and by the Foresters in the
Independent loop. The Phi Delt
triumph was their second straight.
Since this is a regular term, Intra-
mural awards will be given to groups
and individuals as they are during
the normal year.
I-M's will be the only real means
of competition on campus during the
summer, so all those who are inter-
ested should note the blank which
can be found on page eight of to-
day's Daily.
HEank GreenbeargIII;
Cards Buy Catcher
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., June 15.-VP)
-Hank Greenberg was taken to the
Naval Air Station Hospital in Miami
last night apparently suffering from
an acute attack of appendicitis but
his condition today was improved
and an operation was believed un-
necessary.
The Army Air Forces, where the
former Detroit baseball star is in the
Officer Candidate School, said his
condition was very good.
ST. LOUIS, June 15. -(IP)- The
St. Louis Cardinals tonight an-
nounceduthe purchase oft28-year-old
Sam Narron, a catcher, from the
Rochester, N.Y., club of the Interna-
tional League. Narron is due to join
the Cards in New York tomorrow.

Monday's Results
No games scheduled.
Tuesday's Games
New York at Detroit (2)
Philadelphia at Chicago, night
Boston at St. Louis, night
Washington at Cleveland, night

New York ......
Boston.........
Cleveland......
Detroit........
St. Louis,....
Chicago ....
ihiladelphia .
Washington ..

'A.

BE COMFORTABLE in this sum-
mer's heat. Slack Suits are ideal
for the classroom, for sports, -and
for casual evening wear. The easy
tailoring and the light weight
fabrics assure comfortable wear-
ing,
COME IN and. see our varied
selection in cottons, rayons, gab-
ardines, or celanese. $4.95 up

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&3

WE LCOME-
Summer Students
Our Fan-Cooled Modern Shop is for
Particular Men and Women who de-
sire the Modern Barber services.
It's a typically Michigan environ-
ment specializing in Personality
Hair styling, scalp treatments, fa-
ciais, and the popular "Crew Cut."
The Dascola Barbers
Between State and Mich. Theatre

REFLECTING THE YOUTHFUL VIEWPOINT

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For COOL

Listening

this Summer.
May we suggest the foliowing:

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Barber of Seville ........ . DM
Victor Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

898

Columbia Album -
Schumann - Symphony No. 2 M 503
Minneapolis Symphony; - Dimitri Mitropoidos
Columbia Album - Mendelssohn-
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Cleveland Sym phony - Arfur Rodzinsk i
Victor Album-
Racmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 DM 58
Rqchnmaninoff - Stok owsk.i and Philadelphia Orch.

$9.0
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Ringing Out Our
Welcomer
to the
Sumurer Students
of 1942

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Bach - Italian Concerto
Arir Schnabel
Victor Album-
Loeffler - Pagan Poem ...
Eas/man - Rochester Symphony
Irene Gedney, Pianist
Columbia Album-
Musical Comedy Favorites, Vol. 2.
A ndr6 Kostelanetz

DM 806

Stein Bloch COOL
gentlemanly air

DM 876

Our HEARTIEST
men and women

WELCOME to the many Michigan
attending the rejuvenated summer

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And you will enjoy the many fine facilities of the
Alleriel. The fine atmosphere, the excellent service,
the large variety of food and drinks. For a genuinely
good time, try the Allenel.
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