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June 25, 1942 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-06-25

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, JUNE 25, 1942

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

- U

..

Rehearsals
For Coming
Play Open.
Sheridan's 'The Rivals'
To Begin Run July 8
In Repertory Season
By BERY, SHOENFIELD
Rehearsals have begun for Richard
B. Sheridan's comedy, "The Rivals,"
initial offering of the Department of
Speechi' 1942 Michigan Repertory
Players. Opening July 8 and con-
tinuing through August 18, the Play-
ers will present a program of five
plays and an operetta.
Distinguished among the six guest
instructors is Howard Bay, stage de-
signer for the current -production of
Steinbeck's "The Moon Is Down,"
who will be art director for the sea-
son, assisted by Horace Armistead,
scenic painter, and William Kellum,
stage builder.
Claribel Baird returns to Ann Ar-
bor for her -third consecutive year
as actress and director, along with
Lucy Barton, 1939 Repertory cos-
tumiere.
Also a repeater with the Players is
' Charles H. Meredith, managing di-
rector of New Orleans' Le Petit du
Vieux Carre.
Following "The Rivals," will
be Robert Ardrey's extraordinary
"Thunder Rock," a story of a Lake
Michigan lighthouse keeper who
brings to life again the spirits of six
people, 90 years dead. The ultra
Bohemian atmosphere of a family of
artists is the essence of Noel Cow-
ard's farce, "Hay Fever," which opens
the third week of the run.
Included as one of the best 'ten
plays of the year by Burns Mantle,
is "Letters to Lucerne," by Fritz Rot-
ter and Allen Vincent, first of the
" ewer war dramas to command at-
tention. Of different nature is the
lighter "Misalliance," by George
Bernard Shaw, a tale of an under-
wear manufacturer's family.
Special summer rates are avail-
able on 'tickets for the summer sea-*
son and reservations may be made
by mail or at the box office of the
Lydia Mendelssohn, open daily ex-
cept Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Counter sale of season tickets will
open Monday and single tickets will
be placed on sale the following Fri-
day.
Daily at 1--3-5-7-9 P.M.
Cooled To Your Comfort
STARTS TODAY!

More Rubber.
Asked In Drive

Kenjp
Fior

Salvage -Increase

'd

A plea to tuirnin ever-increasing E
amounts of scrap rubber to the fill-
ing station piles came yesterday from
Paul R. Kempf, state salvage com-
mitteeman.
"With less than a week to go, Ann
Arbor and Washtenaw residents must
really come across in the scrap rub-.
ber collection campaign if the county
is to go over the top," Kempf de-'
clared. The county quota is 200 tons.
The drive will end' June 30 when
citizens will find increasing diffi-
culty in disposing of scrap rubber
so that it can be used in war in-
dlustry- The rubber will be weighed,
tabulated and the totals will be used
in the solution of the problem of gas
rationing.
Meanwhile, Ann Arbor's Fire Chief
Benjamin Zahn discovered a verit-
able lode of the precious scrap rub-r
ber in a corner of the fire station. K
Silent Al er t Planned
LANSING, June 24.-(P)-A state-
wide air raid warning, the first to
test Michigan's alert system, will be
sounded within a fortnight but the
civilari aopulation won't know it,
Capt. Donald S. Leonard, state
commander of the Citizens Defense
Corps, said today the general alarm
will not reach the public, the test;
merely designed to determine theI
speed with which Michigan must act.

Taxes
In Brief. .
WASHINGTON, June 24"1.
Here are two major provisions of the
tax bill approved today by t.he Ways
and Means Committee:
INCOME TAXES
Personal exemptions lowered from
$750 to $500 for single persons, from
$1,500 to $1,200 for married persons;
$400 credit for each dependent con-
tinued. Normal tax raised from 4 to
6 per cent, with 10 per cent earned
income credit retained; surtaxes in-
creased from per cent on first $2,000
to 12 per cent. Beginning next Jan-
uary, 10 per cent of income in excess
of personal exemptions and credits
will be deducted from paychecks Lo
apply on taxes.
CORPORATION TAXES l
Present excess profits rates rang-
ing from 35 to 60 per cent raised to
flat 94 per cent, with post-wear credit
equal to 14 per cent of net income
which is subject to this rate. In-
vested capital and average earnings
alternatives continued for computing
"excess profits." Combined normal
and surtax rates-applied on income
not subject to excess profits taxes-
raised from 31 to 40 per cent for cor-
porations with income above $25,000.
Specific exemption to which all cor-
porations entitled raised from $5,000
to $10,000. Numerous provisions were
adopted for special hardship cases.
EXCISE TAXES
Taxes on beer, wine, whiskey, cig-
arettes, cigars, telephone and tele-
graph bills, and pari-mutuel wagers
were also included.

The Crafker Barrel
1 B -y Mike Dan
Daily Sports Editor
0 Two Kin ds Of All-American*...

Craduate Club
Meets Sunday
Outidoor Activities Group
Anotinces Program
The Graduate Outing Club, en-
trusted with the organization of out-
of-doors activities of graduate stu-
dents. will meet at 2:30 p~m. Sunday
at the northwest entrance of the
Rackham Building for a hike and
supper in the wilds.
Chief functions of the Graduate
Council are the promotion of the
social, educational and intellectual
activities of the graduate student
body and the encouragement of co-
operation and understanding between
students and faculty.
Students interested in assisting in
planning classical record programs,
luncheons, coffee hours and informal
record dances are urged to attend
the Graduate Council meeting at 5
p.m., July 2, in the East Lecture
Room of the Rackham Building.
Classical record programs at 8 p.m.
every Tuesday, a Coffee hour at 4:30
p.m. July 8 and a mixer scheduled
for 9 p.m. to 12 p.m. July 11, will be
held in the Rackham Building,
Friday Dance
Theme To Be
'Bo w-Ca tcher'
The League Council announces
that its tomorrow evening 9 p.m. to
midnight dance will be a "Bow-cat-
cher." No, girls, this is not a revival
of Sadie Hawkins day but the name
of the theme of the evening. Decora-
tions will feature fat ribbon bows,
the men attending will be given bow
ties, and you'll be able to tell a host-
ess by a similar adornment in her
curls.,
The dance will be accompanied by
Gordon Hardy, His Piano and His
Orchestra. All summer semester and
eight week students, with or without
dates, men or coeds, are invited to
attend.
A partial list of hostesses includes
Anne Belshaw, Dorothy Whitemore,
'Nancy Scholes, Marianne Gooding,
Mary McKenzie, Josephine Clancy,
Marilynn Vogel, Dorothy Vogel, Gret-
ta Scheirla, Virginia Dodd, Frances
Ramsdell, Mary L. Wright, Betty-
Alice Brown and Elizabeth Grimes.
It is requested that hostesses be at
the League by 8:45 p'.m. Friday eve-
ning.
High Iway Network
For Bomber Plant
Planned By State
LANSING, June 24. -(P)- The
State Highway Department moved
today to fill in a $2,461,382.21 gap in
the highway network which will serve
the U.S. bomber plant at Willow Run.
It determined low bids for seven
construction projects on the Detroit
industrial expressway, the hew limit-
ed access route which will link De-
trot and the big factory, and for the
building of another portion of the
road network.
Eighth project calls for 1.444 miles
of grading and concrete paving on
the Michigan Avenue connection to
the Ecorse Road, in Wayne and
Washtenaw counties, and also will
serve the bomber plant.
Alumni Given Posts -
Mr. T. H. Tapping, general-secre-
tary of the Alumnus Association, an-
nounced yesterday that two new
members had been elected last week
to the National Board of Directors
of Alumni.

WI
Fro
If t
descen
might
hot Bi
fire a
get wi
the w
Sho
baseba
City
Foxx,
etc.,
some
the Be
But
clutch
pitche
fire,
shrug
relega
ball c
Yes
hurler
twirled
agains
secon
their
starts.
with
test's
CLE
eran
Athlet
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last s
tered
SJoit
Fr
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the J
ported

MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES:

illints' Home R u, Wagner's
Fuse H urling Whip >Ietroit, LO
By HALE CHAMPION cluding homnets by Milnar and Les
om Associated Press summnarim) Fleming,
he Yankees care to take a con- * *
iding look behind them, they I jjillia He ts 'T.ig 1 -
discover that a bunch of red-
3oston Red Sox are breathing DETROIT, June 24.--Ted Wil-
nd brimstone in an effort to liams' seventh inning home run-his
ithin challenging distance of 17th. of the season-and Charley
torld champions. Wagner's sterling three-hit pitchin
rld aftehe sn'sjob brought the Boston Red Sox a<
rtly after the season's opening 1 to 0 triumph over the Detroit Ti-
all writers-impressed by Bean gr natiih aetdy
a suggers Ted Williams, Jimmy gers in a twilight game~i< today.
Boston .......000 000 100-1 8 1
Bobby Doerr, Dom DiMaggio, at Detroit ... .000 000 000-0 3 2
and pleasantly surprised by Wagner and Conroy; Trucks and
fine rookie pitching-picked Parsons
oston club to push the Yanks. *rsn*
when Jimmy Foxx lost his
-hitting punch and the rookie Yla iS Tr'li Browns, 6-4
ors temporarily retreated under -ST. LOUIS, June 24.-The New
tlhe song of praise became a York Yankees took another step out
of indifference for what was of their slump today with their sec-
ted to the ranks of mediocre ond straight victory over the St.
lubs. Louis Browns, 6 to 4.
terday one of those recruit * *
s, Broadway Charley Wagner, Sx Shut Out Solons
d a neat three-hit shutout
st the Detroit Tigers and the CHICAGO, June 24. - Johnny
d-place Bostonians chalked up -Humphries, Chicago White Sox
eleventh victory in twelve right-hander who authored four
Ted Williams won the game shutouts ins six 1941 starts, reverted
a homer which was the con- to his scoreless form today to blank
sole score. Washington's Senators on eight hits
while his battery mate, Tom Turner,
,'alis Whip Af's, 9-0 helped out 'with a homer with the
bases loaded. The score was 6 to 0.
KVELAND, June 24.-The vet- * *
southpaw, Al Milnar, gage the
tics five safeties in three in- Cards Get Twin Defeat
then held them hitless for the BOSTON, June 24,-The St. Louis
9ix today as the Indians regis- Cardinals' pennant hopes suffered
a 9 'to 0 win with 15 hits, in- rude jolts today when the Boston
Braves pulled out of a prolonged los-
ing streak by sweeping a double-
vorel ys header from the second-place Cardi-
nals by 6-2 and 3-1 margins.
C * * *
Night Baseball
nston Carries Sailors NEW YORK, June 4,. - A
tenth-inning home run by Bert Haas
romii Lost Lexington gave the-Cincinnati Reds a 4 to 3 vic-
tory over the New. York Girnts to-
t ANGELES, June 24.-(,P)- night after Frank McCormick had
man Stanley' Johnston did a connected for his tenth roundtripper
nan taney ohntonof the season with one on' in the
job of reporting the battle of eighth inning to tiethe score. Bucky
oral Sea, but neglected to tell Walters pitched the entire route for
eroic part he himself played in Cincinn'ati and allowed only six hits.
nal hours of the big aircraft * * *
r. PHILADELPHIA, June 24. -
Comm. Weldon O. Hamilton, Claude Passeau chalked up his 11th
ron leader who first sighted victory of the season tonight as he
apanese carrier Ryukaku, re- pitched the Chicago Cubs to a 3 to 1
I today that Johnston, Chicago victory over the last place Phils.

WITH.FAMOUS athletic figures be-
ing handed exhalted Army and
Navy Commissions at the drop of a
hat your columnist feels that this is
a good time to talk about an athlete,
who was perhaps, far greater than
any of them.
This guy, unlike his well-known
colleag\es, rehised numerous fancy
desk jobs and gold-plated titles so
he could start right from the bottom,
in the country's active fighting
forces.
This exception to the popular,
trend is Michigan's Tom Harmon.
Harmon is now in California
working his head off to be one 6ft
the country's best combat fliers.
Before long he will be sent across(
to get more than his share of the
slant-eyed dope peddlers.f
Last year the ,All-American half-'
back had offers by the dozen to ac-.
cept some recruiting or publicity job'
for different branches of the armed
forces. But he turned them all down
with a cold, no.
Harmon was a great competitor and
he knew he could never sit around
and let the other boys do the fighting.
He just wanted to be a "doer" instead
of an "asker" and that's all there was
to it.
Marshall's
SCOOPFOR TODAY
One Pound
Brigg's Tobacco
89c
'his price effective
Thursday, June 25, only
Marshall's
Next to State Theatre

It's true that Tom asked for a
two months deferment after he"
applied for his commission in the
,Army Air Forces, but it was on
grounds of dependents. He had
all the right in the world to do this
because contrary, to popular belief
Harmon does not have a lot of
money.
ALL IN ALL, he did not earn, over
$30,000 from pictures, profession-
al football,-radio announcing and ad-
vertising. More than half of that
total was spent on a house for his
parents, which he started to build
before Pearl Harbor.
After Tom receiyes his commission
most of the money he earns will have
to be sent home to support his father
and mother.
! All of this is just an added incent-
ive to the All-American to give the
Army all that's in him.
In a 'recent letter to Russ O'Brien,
a close friend here in Ann Arbor, Tom
said:
The Air Force is a great thing.
You can't imagine the tremendous
advantages that it offers to any
boy who wants to serve his country.
The competition is tough, but it
only makes my work a lot more
interesting."
T HAT'S HARMON for you, no mat-
ter what he is in 'he gives it all
he's got. He could never stand to
take a back seat in anything he tried.
That's why he's probably Michi-
gan's greatest football player.
All your columnist can say is,
"that I would hate like hell to be a
Jap 1iilot when Harmon is out
hunting Zeros."

Tribune correspondent and only re-
porter aboard, was one of the real
heroes of the Lexington.
"When it became apparent the
Lexington was in a bad way John-
ston went below decks for his papers
and personal effects. He came up a
little later, but didn't have any dia-
ries. He was lugging a badly wounded
seamen. He dashed down again, still
after his notes. Pretty soon he re-
turned, carrying another injured
man.
"I don't know how many times he
repeated the performance. Every time
he insisted he was going after his
stuff, and every time he came back
with a wounded or burned sailor. He
risked his life time and again."

U

A NEW WARNER BROS. HIT
KAY FRANCIS -WALTER HUSTON
.n~d iiod,; rg gl~orous.rm,4d
GLORIA WARREN
with PATTY HALE . FRANKIE THOMAS - SORRAH
MiNEVITCH & HIS RASCALS -"Dueded 6yfJOGRAHAM
Extra
Richard Himber & Band
Porky's Midnight Matinee
News of the Day
JAMES STEWART
"Winning Your Wings"
Coming Sunday
Norma "WE WERE
Shearer DANCING"

U. Of M. Club Formed
, By Alumni In Ecuador
The Michigan Alumnus Associa-
tion was informed early this week
that a University of Michigan Club
had been formed last May 21 in the
South American city of Quito, Ecu-
ador.
The club was organized by 32
Ecuadoreans, members of a group
which attended Michigan University
last summer. -They were here sev-
eral weeks and completed work which
the University arranged especially
for them.
The group includes Augustin Ar-
royo, son of Ecuador's president.

"There's a good
0
BARBER SHOP
in the Union'

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

FOR RENT

YOUNG MAN to share apartment.
Excellent setup at reasonable rate.
Phone 2-3952.

LOST and FOUND
LOST--Light tan gabardine rain-
coat. Name in collar. Call 225
Wenley House. Reward.
WANTED
WANTED-Several copies of THE
MICHIGAN DAILY for Wednes-
day, March 11, and Sunday, April
5. Must have these copies for im-
portant record files. WILL PAY.
Call Mi's. Wallace, 2-3241.
HELP WANTED
BOARD & ROOM JOB for boy who
will help with breakfast and din-
ner. 7380.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c

T HE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
The Michigan Repertory Players
in
6 BRILLIANT PLAYS
JULY 8 -- AUGUST 18
* THE RIVALS * LETTERS TO LUCERNE
THUNDER ROCK * MISALLIANCE
* HA FEVER * H.M.S. PINAFORE
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES
SEASON PRICES: $3.96 - $3.30 - $2.31 (including Federal tax)
SINGLE ADMISSIONS: 88c - 66c - 44c (including Federal tax)
( "PINAFORE" $1.10 - 88c - 66c including tax)

iINDIVIDUALIZED LAUNDRY
SERVICE
Each bundle done separately,
by hand
No Markings

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