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June 24, 1942 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGAN DAILY

Rubber Drive
Results Please,
StateOfficials
Michigan Campaign/ Nears
Five Pound Per Citizen
Quota, Report Says
I?4ichigan's contribution to the
nation-wide rubber salvage cam-
paign, based on a quota of five
pounds per capita, 'has been bigger
than expected, the state salvage
committee reported yesterday from
Lansing.
Exact totals of th, encouraging
returns were banned from publica-
tion by Federal censorship regula-
tions, the committee pointed out.
Greatest Possible Use
Greatest possible use of the sal-
vaged scrap rubber will be accomp-
lished, according to an announce-
ment by Kenneth M. Burns, com-
mittee chairman. The Consumers
Division of the Office of Price Ad-
ministration has requested that rub-
ber overshoes and galoshes, either
singly or in pairs, be withheld from
the salvage heap, he said.
The Division will shortly establish
facilities for pooling such articles
and also will provide for recondi-
tioningsof robber items.
Reclaimed rubber in years before
the war had, played aIn important
'part in the production of such com-
mnodties as rubbers, overshoes and
galoshes. It is expected that re-
claimed rubber will play ah ever
more important part in the produc-
tion of these staple articles.
' ~Began Early
As early as 1938 American rubber
processors began more intensive Use
, of reclaimed rubber. The fear of a
Far Eastern war accentuated this
trend.
Contributions in Wayne County
hit the mark of 3,000,000 pounds of
scrap. But an even greater amount
i1 expected to swell the already great
stock piles there.
It was discovered that public
transportation companies held old
tires to turn, in for new ones when
necessary. A. system of vouchers for
the worn-out spares is being worked
to release thousands of pounds of
the black gold.
Red Cross Course
Of 8-Week Length
Is OpenTo Coeds
Women wishing to take standard
Red Cross courses this summer will
h ve the opportunity to register for
diem this week. The courses will ex-
t d through the eight-week sum-
mer session and will be conducted
by Red Cross instructors.
The subjects offered this semester
are First Aid and Home Nursing.
If there is sufficient demand for it
a group studying Advanced First Aid
Instructorship will be formed. No
University credit is given for the
work but the Red Cross will issue
certificates to those who successfully
complete their courses.
Registration will be conducted in
the lobby of the Rackham Building
today, tomorrow and Friday from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday morn-
ing from 9 to noon. All summer ses-
sion woman students and regular
semester studentsdpossessing eligi
bility may register.
Dealers Please Notice:
TobaccoCeiling Is Set
A price ceiling is now in effect up-
on tobacco. If you received free

matches with your tobacco purchases
prior to March 1, you should get
them now, according to an announce-
ment Friday in Chicago b'y regional
OPM Administrator John C. Weigel.
Any dealer who did not charge for
niatches before and does now, has in
effect inceased the price of tobacco
in violation of the new price ceiling

Chinese Added
To University
War Courses
Hsing Chih Tien To Teach
Intensive New Program
For Beginning Students
A beginner's intensive course in
Chinese, .latest addition to the Uni-
versity's hurry-up training program
in languages important to the prose-
cution of the war, will be taught in
the summer session by Hsing Chih
Tien.
Although the four hours spent in
conversation at 8 a.m. Monday, Tues-
day, Thursday and Friday and an-
other four in writing at 1 p.m. those
same days will emphasize practical
aspects of the language which can
be immediately used, it is hoped that
Chinese will be taught here perman-
ently and the beginner's course will
be designed to provide a suitable
background for future study, it was
announced by Prof. Leroy Waterman,
head of the Oriental Languages de-
partment.
Tien will lso teach a course in
translations rom the Chinese, in
which English versions of such auth-
ors as the famous poet Lee Po, Tu
Fu and Chu Yan will be studied.
The literature course, for which
two credit hours will be given, is in-
tended to acquaint students with the
historical background of Chinese cus-
toms and traditions.
On The
The American Red Cross, with the
cooperation of the Mutual Broad-
casting System and the Australian
Broadcasting Commission; has orig-
inated a daily series of radio pro-
grams of personal messages from
American troops in Australia to their
families in the United States.
These programs are broadcast by
Mutual daily from 10:15 a.m. to
10:30 aam., CWT, and some stations,
unable to carry the programs at that
time, make transcriptions to broad-
cast at a later period during the day.
National Headquarters makes in-
dividual phonograph records of each
message and sends them to the local
chapter in the soldier's home, with
the request that the chapter deliver
the record to the person to whom it
is addressed and, if necessary, pro-
vide a portable phonograph for play-
ing the record.
This service is part of the Red
Cross Congressional Charter author-
ization to serve as the official link
between soldiers and their families.
At the suggestion of National Head-
quarters, the Red Cross Motor Corps
has instituted a class in drill and
exercise on Monday evenings at Bar-
bour Gymnasium. Emphasizing the
importance of team-work and co-
,ordination in the Corps, the class will
run for six weeks.
The regular monthly meeting of
the Washtenaw County Red Cross
Chapter will be held at noon Fri-
day in the.Production Rooms of West
Hall. All chairmen are expected to

attend and are urged to bring other
interested people. Reservations may
be made at North Hall, or by calling
Ann Arbor 2-5546.
* * *
The Detroit Red Cross Blood Don-
ors Unit will make its seventh visit
to Ann Arbor today. They will set
up their equipment in the Women's
Athletic Building and one hundred
more donors willl be served lunch by
the Canteen Corps. The Motor Corps
will furnish transportation when de-
sired. Bronze buttons and pins will
be given to the new donors.

Sugar, Sugar Everywhere - But None for YOUR Coffee

K
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I
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t
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.:

Stacked deep in the Sugarland, Tex., wareho use of the Imperial Sugar Refinery are 20,000,00
pounds of refined sugar (some shown). M. G. Thom pson, general manager, said that the excess, which
he blamed on rationing, shut the refinery down u ntil July 6, although, he said, the company had
plenty of raw sugar.

Proposed Constitutional Changes
'In Right Direction,' Dorr Says

A geneial rew riting of Michigan's
34-year-old state constitution, rec-
ommended by the State Constitu-
tional Revision Study Commission
for voters' approval at the November
general election, was described by
political science Prof. Harold M.
Dorr as "a step in the right direc-
tion, but only a step. On the whole,
I favor the proposal."
A proposal which would allow the
governor to appoint the secretary of
state, state treasurer, attorney gen-
eral and highway commissioner, but
leaving the auditor general and
lieutenant governor elective met with
Professor Dorr's approval. "It is a
movement that is rather in accord
with state government reorganiza-
tion," he asserted, and although the
attorney general is usually electedC
in reorganized states, there is noj
apparent reason why it should be
handled that way."
Limit Legislative.Power
"A measure guaranteeing labor
the right to organize and bargain
collectively- should only be included
in the rewriting if it is to be put in
the state Bill of Rights as a limita-
tion on legislative power," he as-
serted..
The division of cities with popu-
lations sufficient to elect more than
one legislative representative into
more than one district, a measure
intended to eliminate the election-
at-large of Detroit's 17 representa-
Architecture Association
Elects Bennett President
W. I. Bennett, dean of the archi-
tectural school of the University of
Michigan, was elected president of.
the Association of Collegiate Schools
of Architecture at a meeting of the
Association in Detroit Sunday and
Monday.
Othdr officers elected Sunday are
as follows: vice-president, Loring
Provine, University of Illinois, and
secretary-treasurer, Paul Weigel, of
Kansas State College.

tives, was opposed by Prof. Dorr
because "such a division of a city
would lead to the old ward system.
Some system of proportional repre-
sentation would certainly be prefer-
able."
"There is no doubt that a reap-
portionment of the state legislature
should be undertaken," he contin-
ued, "but I doubt that such a reap-
portionment would very much solve
present legislative problems."
"All state salaries should be raised.
without question," he said, "butdthe
indicated increases for state legis-
lators, elective officials, the governor
and other elective officials would not
necessarily mean getting better men
for the 'offices."
"The office of justice of the peace
could well be dropped out," accord-
ing to Prof. Doerr, "but some local
courts would have to be provided."

Students Attend
Geology Camp
It was announced today that geol-
ogy and surveying field work at
Camp Davis, Wyoming, has the larg-
est summer enrollment in its history.
Twenty-four students have elected
courses offered in the four-, eight-,
and twelve-week sessions, and for
the first time the University is offer-
ing Geology 11 as a field course.
Camp Davis, located near Yellow-
stone National Park, is ideal for field
work, both in geology and in sur-
veying. Surrounded by forest re-
serves, valley lands and mountain
ranges.
The administration and instruc-
tion at Camp Davis is under the di-
rection of Prof. Harry Bouchatd,
Prof. Clifton Carey, Dr. George Eh-
lers, Dr. Armand Eardley, Prof. Ralph
Belknap, Prof. George Bleekman and
Prof. George Stanley.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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A warning to employers who are
irating" away workers from other
ar plants and hindering vital pro-
action, was issued recently by L. H.
endening, manager of the Ann
rbor office of the United States Em-
oyment Service.
"Labor pirating is extremely dis-
trous to the maintenance of steady,
thedules production," Mr. Glenden-
g said. "Employers who pirate
bor from other war contractors
nder the others' production and
ereby hinder the whole war pro-
uction program."

1 I La LJ t-ov F 1i ! 1Yf if%

1

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Light tan gabardine rain-

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044.,' Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 2

coat. Name in collar.
Wenley House. Reward.

Call 225

WANTED

WANTED-Several copies of THE
MICHIGAN DAILY for Wednes-
day, March 11, and Sunday, April
5. Must have these copies for im-
portant record files. WILL PAY.
Call Mrs. Wallace, 2-3241.

iINDIVIDUALIZED LAUNDRY
SERVICE
Each bundle done separately,
by hand
No Markings
Silks, Wools and Coeds' Laundry
Our Specialty
Shirts - 16c
All our work is guaranteed
Cash and Carry
607 E. HOOVER 5594
SILVER LAUNDRY

fir,,,,". '"""'" . "'
... -
{
3
.. w^

HELP WANTED.

I

BOARD & ROOM JOB for boy who
will help with breakfast and din-
ner. 7380.
ROOM, bath, breakfast for student
dent with bicycle in exchmSge for
1 hour's work a day. Call 2-2102.

An exquisite Nylon
marquisette ban-
deau for small and
average figures.
Nutra only.....$2

hM1
\ z
.. . r.
" > 4

lation.
you did get mgtches then,,
t get them now, you should1
for your tobacco.
nn Arbor dealers please note.

and
pay

I

A fter.
"Commando Training"
On your way from 1.-M.

h j , i
'\. ./
YF '
:;:; ioo".;: .
iif

designed by
Izod of London

The Ideal Summertime Bra
Suds it nightly for daintiness, don it daily
.for youthful lines. No amount of tubbing
can make limp or lax PEARMA.LIFT'S gentle
support. The miracle happens at the base of
the bra cup, where a secretly processed inset softly
lifts your bosom, holds that firmn rounded'
contour permanently.
Beautiful shaidow lace.
Made for small and average
figure types in white or
nutra .t .s.".4.$1.0

. S. Pa. No. 2.M~.27
BRAS S IER ES
by HICKORY

/

"TeLftT hvr

F

i

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1

i

I

Stop in at Calkins-Fletcher's

I.

State and Packard Store for a

SLACKS in Cascade Cloth
(linen finish material)

.41095

Thick, Creamy

. .. stays in ton
. .. goes to the country

Enerav-Restorina

I

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G

_ ;..
:.

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