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July 29, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JULY 29, 1942

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MAJOR LEAGUE RESULTS:
Brooks, Cards Split Twin Bill;
Giants Take Two From Cubs

Doomed Ja p W ar ship T hrough Periscope

By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
The last chance for the St. Louis
Cardinals to catch the Brooklyn
Dodgers has passed. Not that many
people thought they had any kind
of a chance, but there are always
diehards.
Yesterday a hot St. Louis team
came charging into Ebbets Field de-
termined to sweep a three-game ser-
ies and seriously challenge the Dodg-
r lead. They took the nightcap of a
doubleheader in order to save their
faces, but that's about all. The Bums
from Brooklyn are still seven games
to the good.
The Chicago Cubs have long had
designs on the New York Giants'
fourth-place position, but no sooner
do they gird themselves for a hand-
to - hand struggle than the Polo
Rival AFL, CIO .
Pickets In Pontiac
Let Fists, Eggs Fly
PONTIAC, Mich., July 28-(A)-
Police Lieut. Charles Thayer said to-
day that the first outbreak of violence
in connection with picketing of Pon-{
tiac food stores had ocurred this
afternoon in a fist fight between a
CIO unionist and a rival AFL picket;
in the downtown area.
Thayer said fists flew in a scuffle
when the CIO representative at-
tempted to take away a banner from
the picket. Police intervened but no
arrests were made.
Thayer declared further that pick-
ets in other sections of the city had
been the target of eggs hurled by un-
identified marksmen.
Another development of the day
was the marching of junior pickets
along with retail clerks (AFL) union-;
ists who are.seeking recognition in
dozens of independently owned stores.
While Pontiac is a predominantly
CIO union town, none would say
where the youngsters, none much
more than 12 years old, came from.
He 'Just Pulled Him Out'
BLOOMFIELD, Neb., July 28.--P)
-Tommy Luke, five years old, proved
himself a hero. He saved his small
brother, Billy, three years old, from
drowning in a livestock water tank,
into which the little boy fell head
first while reaching for a stick.
Asked how he did it, Tommy said,
"I just pulled him out."

Grounds boys deliver some of their
vaunted power and the Cubs sink
back into the mire of the second
division. It happened again yester-
day as the Giants combined power,
and pitching to take a twin bill,
9-5 and 3-0.
Brooks, Cards Split

St. Louis ......101 022 000-6 9

3

Brooklyn .....500 100 01x-7 8 3
White. Pollett (1) and W. Cooper;
French, Davis (6) and Owen.
St. Louis .....001 000 701-9 16 0
Brooklyn.....010 000 000-1 6 2
Lanier and O'Dea; Higbe, Head (7).
Rowe () and Owen.
Giants Sweep Bill
Chicago.......110 001 011-5 12 0
New York ....600 110 lOx-9 17 0
Olsen, Errickson (1) and McCul-
lough: Hubbell and Danning.
Chicago......000 000 )00--0 3 1
New York .. . .000 100 02x-3 4 1
Schmitz, Pressnell (8) and Schef-
fing; Schumacher and Mancuso.
* * *
Ciney Takes Two -
Cincinnati . ...003 000 320-8 12 1
Philadelphia . .100 000 000-1 2 2
Vandermeer and Lamanno; John-
son, Nahem (3), Beck (9) and Liv-
ingston.
Cincinnati ....020 001 000-3 5 0
Philadelphia . .000 000 001-1 5 3
Starr and West; Melton, Pearson
(9) and Warren.
Braves 4, Buccs 3
Pittsburgh ....000 000 003-3 5 2
Boston .......000 001 021-4 10 0
*Butcher, Lanning (8), Wilkie (8),
Dietz (9) and Lopez; Sain, Tost (9)
and Kluttz.
* * * '
Yanks 8, Chisox 3
New York .. ..204 010,001-8 11 0
Chicago ......000 110 010-3 10 1
Bonham and Hemsley; Smith,
Haynes (4) and Turner.
* * *
Night Baseball
Washington . .050 102 100-9 10 * 7
St. Louis .....100 200 010-4 6 1
Carrasquel and, Early; Niggeling,
Caster (2), Appleton (7) and Ferrell.
* * *
Boston .......030 000 000-3 8 1
Cleveland ....000 100 000-1 7 1
Dobson, Ryba (9) and Conroy;
Bagby and Desautels, Hegan (8).
Major Lea ge Standings

Varsity Whips
Local 'Giants '
Nine cores 10-2 Victory
Over Ann Arbor Stars
Another victory was racked up by
the Wolverine nine Monday night.
this one at the expense of the State
Street Giants. 10-2.,
The Giants possessed the big
names, but it was Coach Ray Fisher's
boys who did the run-producing in
the most colorful game this season.
After garnering one run in the first
off the offerings of Bill Albertson,
Kiski prepper who will enter school
this fall, the Wolverines opened up
in the third and scored five runs to
put the game beyond the Stars'
reach. The inning's big rally was
highlighted by Harry Anderson's
lusty triple with two on which
cleaned the bases. Andy also dou-
bled in the sixth to pace the Wolver-
ine attack. Michigan tallied four
unnecessary runs in the sixth, these
runs being made off the former
Maize and Blue hurler Cliff Wise.
Wise did not possess his usual stuff.
having been inactive most of the
season. and the Wolverines hit his
pitching with ease.
The All-Stars collected only four
hits off three Michigan pitchers. A
hit and an error gave the Giants a
run in the second and they com-
bined two hits to push across their
other run in the fifth. Don Smith,
Jack Redinger and Bob Saxton all
saw service for the Fisher nine.

m

!J',

And What's It To You Sir?
FORT DEVENS. Mass., July 28.-R)
-Two soldiers trudged along a road-
way-their full field packs dangling
from their belts in unmilitary fash-
ion.
A jeep approached. A major asked
sarcastically:
"Parachute battalion?"
"No sir," they replied politely.
"Sunburn."
Read The Daily Classifieds!
Vk"~7

This unique picture, made by a Navy photographer, shows, through the periscope of an American sub,
a large Japanese destroyer in its death throes. The picture was made within the submarine, which launched
two torpedoes into the destroyer. It is the first combat action photo taken through the periscope of an Amer-
ican submarine. Note the rising sun insignia atop gu n turret. Two men (circled) in white scramble over the
conning tower. Marks on left and line are periscope etchings. Associated Press photo from U.S. Navy.

The Cracker Barrel

By Mike Dan
Daily Sports Editor

Negroes In Major League Baseball . .
William E. Benswanger, president J can it possibly mean if on the very

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
Hitchcock's top thrille'"
THE ILADY
VANISHES
with
MARGARET LOCKWOOD
MICHAEL REDGRAVE
also COLOR CARTOON
Short Subject
RACKHAM
LECTURE HALL
Friday Evening
Two Shows:
7:00 and 9:00 P.M.'
Tickets . . . 39c
on sale
at Wahr's and League
Coming Sunday
Two Shows:
7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
The Childhood of
MAXIM GORKY
Proceeds to be used for
Scholarships to aid needy students

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
New York .......67
Boston.... ...55
Cleveland .......55
St. Louis ........52
Detroit.........47
Chicago.........40
Washington .....39
Philadelphia ....40

L
29
42
46
48
52
55
60
63

Pct.
.698
.567
.540
.520
.475
.421
.394
.388

GB
121/2
141/2
17
211/2
261/2
291/2
30%/2

Games Wednesday
Philadelphia at Detroit (twilight)
Boston at Cleveland
Washington at St. Louis
New York at Chicago (Twi-
light and Night)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

of the Pittsburgh baseball club, an-
nounced that three players from the
Negro National League will be given
a chance to try out for the Pirates.
This unquestionably will make
baseball history. Never before in the
annals of America's favorite pastime
have Negroes been given a chance to
compete in Major League baseball.
We can think of no greater thorn
in the side of racial tolerance than
this practice of baseball moguls of
barring Negroes from baseball. We
have heard time and again that
baseball teaches the youth of our
nation fair play and sportsmanlike
habits. But to believe this is sheer
folly. How can anything or anybody
teach right from wrong that ignores
the very basis for fair play ... the
right of all to have an$ equal chance
to compete.
Stock Arguments
Yes, we all remember the stock
arguments that are used whenever
this subject is brought up; they
wouldn't be able to stay in the same
hotels, the Southern baseball players
would object, Negroes 'aren't smart
enough to play big-time baseball and
lastly, they don't really want to.
Any broad-minded person can see
that those arguments are merely
rationalizations for the undemocratic
principles of Major League officials.
Negroes compete on college teams
throughout the nation today and
have little trouble finding the proper
sleeping and eating accommodations.
We all know from such colored stars
as Sachel Page that some Negroes
have all the ability necessary to play
in the American or National League.
Negroes want to play in the senior
circuits but never ivoice this desire
because of its apparent futility..
Southern Player Status
This leaves only one objection un-
answered-the one concerning the
Southern players' intense hate for
all Negroes. There can be only one
solution to this problem. Either the
Southern players (who are often too
dumb to sign their own names) ac-
cept the Negro'as a fellow player
or the Southern whites should get
off the team. We cannot let any
minorie force their undemocratic
ideals no matter in what field they
exist.
In times such as these it seems al-
most hypocritical that some people
will fight for something at home and
fight against that very thing abroad.
Mr. Benswanger reminded his fel-
low baseball men that, "Negroes are
American citizens with American
rights." Such talk is one of the
strongest weapons in assuring the
rights of free peoples everywhere.
Outcome Of Vital Interest,
Before important Major League
baseball games the band plays the
"Star Spangled Banner" but what

field above which the flag flies cer-
tain groups are barred because of
racial discrimination?
The outcome of Mir. Benswanger's
experiment will be of vital interest
to un-Americans as well as Ameri-
cans. Let us hope that baseball can
teach us the cardinal principle of
any democracy-"fair play for all."
* * *
Cracker Crumbs: Johnny Gillis
and Norm Call, two ex-Michigan
athletic stars, were sworn into the
U.S. Coast Guard service yesterday.
They will leave for training shortly
at New Bedford, Conn.
DON'T FAIL TO ATTEND THE
GIANT PEM PROGRAM TONIGHT.
IT WILL BE A SUCCESS AND YOU
ALL KNOW THE REASON WHY IT
HAS TO BE.
Steady Hog Market
Will Avoid Scarcity
In Fall - Wickard

-I
OPENING TONIGHT
The Department of Speech presents,
Michigan Repertory Players in
to
Rated as one of the best of the curernt New York season.
TONIGHT THROUGH SATURDAY at 8:30 P.M.
Ticket'Prices: 88c 66c - 44c (including federal tax)
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Phone 6300

F-

4 9 yorkS
al*i otjwanr ro.
howling now hill -

/

HURRY ... before we sell out of a Fortunate Purchase of

a

v

Brooklyn .......
St. Louis .......
Cincinnati.....
New York.... .
Chicago .......
Pittsburgh....
Boston ........
Philadelphia ...

W L
68 29
60 35
52 44
51 46
46 53
42 51
40 60
27 68

Pet;
.701
.632
.542
.526
.465
.452
.400
.284

GB
7
15 1/
17
23
24
29 1/
40

Games Wednesday
Pittsburgh at Boston (2)
Cincinnati at Philadelphia
(night)
Chicago at New York (2)
St. Louis at Brooklyn (twilight)
YOUR APPEARANCE
is important for all occasions. Let us
help you look well-groomed.
Have you tried them?
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre

CHICAGO, July 28--P)-Secretary
of Agricllture Wickard today urged
farmers to send a big share of their
new herd of hogs to market earlier
than usual this fall to avert a serious
shortage of pork.
He also informed them that, once
the run of pigs becomes Ieavy, it
must be kept at a steady flow to
avoid swamping the slaughter houses.
Wickard, who already had adjusted
lease-lend pork prices to bring small
processors back into normal operation
to relieve a scarcity of meats in some
areas, conferred with war board
chairmen and extension service offic-
ials from ten midwestern states on
steps to ensure adequate livestock
production for the nation and its
allies in the months ahead.
The Secretary reported that Amer-
ican farmers were raising about 20,-
000,000 more hogs thah last year, an
increase of almost 25 per cent, and
that the number of cattle on farms
and ranches was the largest on rec-
ord.
BOOK SALE
at
SLAT ER'S
336 So. State

CLASSIC

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When the weather is hot.
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sightly because they are made of heavy
flannel quilted on both sides with rayon
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